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Elie Wiesel

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OPINION
April 23, 2013 | Patt Morrison
It was a fine April day last week that found Elie Wiesel at Chapman University; it was a fine April day too, 58 years earlier, when the gaunt, teenage Wiesel found himself alive and suddenly free to walk out of the Buchenwald concentration camp. In the decades since, Wiesel's impassioned writing and speaking have won him a Nobel Peace Prize, and a large place in the public intellectual discourse about the Holocaust and the human condition. They have also brought him to Chapman each spring for the last three years as a distinguished presidential fellow, meeting with students and faculty to keep the significance of the Holocaust green in their minds.
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NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
If you were wondering, well, so was I: how is it that Elie Wiesel, the renowned Nobel Peace Prize laureate and Holocaust survivor and author, came to be an annual fixture on the campus at Orange County's Chapman University, founded as a Protestant institution of the Disciples of Christ? That's where I interviewed him for my last column , in the school's growing center for Holocaust studies, with an academic program and a memorial library to support it all. Wiesel told me he credits the center's director and founder, Marilyn J. Harran , a scholar of Martin Luther who has been a well-nigh irresistible force in making the place happen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1986
I would like to thank you for your very moving, sensitive and insightful editorial (Oct. 15), "The Wounding Truth," concerning the award of the Nobel Peace Prize to novelist and spokesman Elie Wiesel. Your editorial so beautifully reiterates the often forgotten truth that people who knowingly, or unknowingly, shun evil deeds of the past are more likely to repeat them again in the future. With the number of political extremists on the scene today, this message bears repeating. ANN HAYMAN NOSANOV Los Angeles
OPINION
April 23, 2013 | Patt Morrison
It was a fine April day last week that found Elie Wiesel at Chapman University; it was a fine April day too, 58 years earlier, when the gaunt, teenage Wiesel found himself alive and suddenly free to walk out of the Buchenwald concentration camp. In the decades since, Wiesel's impassioned writing and speaking have won him a Nobel Peace Prize, and a large place in the public intellectual discourse about the Holocaust and the human condition. They have also brought him to Chapman each spring for the last three years as a distinguished presidential fellow, meeting with students and faculty to keep the significance of the Holocaust green in their minds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1991 | PSYCHE PASCUAL
Nobel Prize winner and concentration camp survivor Elie Wiesel will appear at a Thousand Oaks synagogue Sunday to discuss the Holocaust. A scholar and human rights advocate, Wiesel, 62, won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986. He is on tour to promote his book, "From the Kingdom of Memory." The event is sponsored by the San Fernando Valley Region Jewish Federation Council and synagogues in the Conejo Valley. Wiesel will appear at a $90-a-plate dinner at 5:30 p.m. at Temple Etz Chaim, 1080 Janss Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2010 | By Michael Harris, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Sonderberg Case A Novel Elie Wiesel, translated from the French by Catherine Temerson Alfred A. Knopf: 178 pp., $25 Elie Wiesel's "Night," a memoir of Auschwitz and Buchenwald that is a pillar of Holocaust literature, is read by schoolchildren all over the world. In the years since he published it in 1958, Wiesel has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize and written some 50 books of fiction and nonfiction. Few would argue that a man who was sent to the extermination camps at 15, who saw his mother and little sister led off to the gas chambers and who watched the Nazis work and starve his father to death shouldn't write about the Holocaust as often as he pleases — especially now, when the witnesses are dying out. A better question to ask is whether Wiesel's new novel, "The Sonderberg Case," adds anything measureable to his body of work.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Hostage A Novel Elie Wiesel, translated from the French by Catherine Temerson Alfred A. Knopf: 214 pp., $25.95 It's hard to read Elie Wiesel's new novel, "Hostage," without thinking about his classic Holocaust recollection, "Night. " That's partly because both deal with captivity, and even more with questions of faith and identity and our place in the universe, at a moment when such elements appear to have been rendered moot. But even more, "Hostage," like "Night," begs the question of how we read it - of the type of document it is. In the case of the earlier book, that tension (and it is very much a tension)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Since Elie Wiesel--Holocaust witness, author, Nobel Peace Prize laureate--views his mission as asking questions, it seems right to ask one of Wiesel. During his hourlong discussion, "Moyers: Facing Hate With Elie Wiesel" (at 10 tonight on KCET Channel 28 and KPBS Channel 15), this survivor of Auschwitz and Buchenwald spends more time despairing over his failure to stop anti-Semitic inmates from beating his father than despairing over the crimes Nazis inflicted upon him . Why?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the films screening in the richly diverse "Cinema Judaica '96" series currently at the Music Hall is Melissa Hacker's "My Knees Were Jumping" (Wednesday at 7:15), yet another remarkable documentary bringing to light yet another largely unfamiliar aspect of the Holocaust. One of the most reprehensible aspects of the Holocaust was how many countries, especially in the West and including the United States, refused entry to European Jews desperate to emigrate as the Nazi terror escalated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Nobel Peace laureate and Holocaust scholar Elie Wiesel was dragged from an elevator and roughed up, possibly by a Holocaust denier, during a peace conference at a hotel last week, police said Friday. According to San Francisco Police Sgt. Neville Gittens, a man approached Wiesel and requested an interview with the acclaimed author on the evening of Feb. 1 at the Argent Hotel, which was hosting the forum sponsored by the San Francisco-based RockRose Institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Hostage A Novel Elie Wiesel, translated from the French by Catherine Temerson Alfred A. Knopf: 214 pp., $25.95 It's hard to read Elie Wiesel's new novel, "Hostage," without thinking about his classic Holocaust recollection, "Night. " That's partly because both deal with captivity, and even more with questions of faith and identity and our place in the universe, at a moment when such elements appear to have been rendered moot. But even more, "Hostage," like "Night," begs the question of how we read it - of the type of document it is. In the case of the earlier book, that tension (and it is very much a tension)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
The Mormon Church apologized Tuesday for a "serious breach of protocol" after it was discovered that the parents of the late Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal were posthumously baptized as Mormons. The church also acknowledged that one of its members tried to baptize posthumously three relatives of Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel. The efforts, at least in Wiesenthal's case, violated the terms of an agreement that the church signed in 1995, in which it agreed to stop baptizing Jewish victims of the Holocaust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Twenty-one Chapman University freshman listened intently this week as Nobel Peace Prize laureate and Nazi death camp survivor Elie Wiesel discussed the role of religion and morality in the face of immense, terrifying evil. Wiesel, 82, a witness to the human suffering experienced in the Auschwitz, Buna and Buchenwald concentration camps, was in his element — assuming the burden of memory for the millions who did not survive the Holocaust. The much-honored writer and professor clearly relished the exchanges in the main library at the campus in Orange.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2010 | By Michael Harris, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Sonderberg Case A Novel Elie Wiesel, translated from the French by Catherine Temerson Alfred A. Knopf: 178 pp., $25 Elie Wiesel's "Night," a memoir of Auschwitz and Buchenwald that is a pillar of Holocaust literature, is read by schoolchildren all over the world. In the years since he published it in 1958, Wiesel has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize and written some 50 books of fiction and nonfiction. Few would argue that a man who was sent to the extermination camps at 15, who saw his mother and little sister led off to the gas chambers and who watched the Nazis work and starve his father to death shouldn't write about the Holocaust as often as he pleases — especially now, when the witnesses are dying out. A better question to ask is whether Wiesel's new novel, "The Sonderberg Case," adds anything measureable to his body of work.
OPINION
June 29, 2010 | Marvin Hier
Over the last few years, U.S. political discourse has been saturated with opponents accusing each other of Nazi-like policies or behavior. Most recently, it was California Atty. Gen. Jerry Brown who likened the attack ads of Meg Whitman, his Republican opponent in the race for governor, to the tactics employed by Nazi propaganda chief Josef Goebbels. Brown later called me to say he regretted citing Goebbels. But most of the comparisons are made without apology. Last week, Sarah Palin criticized President Obama's handling of the BP crisis in a tweet to followers recommending they read an article by Thomas Sowell that compared Adolph Hitler's use of a financial crisis to give himself dictatorial powers to Obama's role in creating the BP escrow fund.
WORLD
December 9, 2009 | By Christi Parsons
President Obama will be in Oslo on Thursday to accept the Nobel Peace Prize, an award of great prestige and renown that also carries some baggage. Here's some background: The honor: Obama receives the award for being the person who has done the most to promote international fraternity and for "the abolition or reduction of standing armies." The irony: The ceremony comes just days after Obama announced that he would send 30,000 more troops to fight the war in Afghanistan.
OPINION
April 6, 2009
The students are rapt as they watch a seven-minute video about Josef Mengele, the so-called Angel of Death reviled for his cruel pseudo-experiments on concentration camp inmates during World War II. Seeing this, they can better understand the atrocities experienced by Elie Wiesel and chronicled in "Night," his sparely phrased but haunting account of death and life under the Nazi German regime. "Oh my God," one girl gasps at the sight of emaciated survivors. "This is horrible."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
"Purple in the grays. Vermillion in the orange shadows, on a cold, fine day." -- Pierre Bonnard, from his notebooks -- Manhattan in a winter storm seems galaxies away from Bonnard's bright interiors. I carry an exhibition catalog from the Metropolitan Museum of Art to Elie Wiesel's office in Midtown.
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