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Elinor Remick Warren

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March 16, 2000 | CHRISTINE FREY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was one of the few American female composers to gain national prominence in the first half of the century, and for years--until the 1970s--Los Angeles native Elinor Remick Warren's choral music made her one of the country's most-performed female composers. By the time she died in 1991, however, there was waning demand for the elaborate compositions that had won a broad listenership for her 200 published works.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2000 | CHRISTINE FREY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was one of the few American female composers to gain national prominence in the first half of the century, and for years--until the 1970s--Los Angeles native Elinor Remick Warren's choral music made her one of the country's most-performed female composers. By the time she died in 1991, however, there was waning demand for the elaborate compositions that had won a broad listenership for her 200 published works.
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NEWS
April 28, 1991
Elinor Remick Warren, a pioneering woman composer who wrote more than 200 pieces for voice and orchestra during her 75-year career, died Saturday in her Los Angeles home after a short illness. She was 91. A native of Los Angeles, Miss Warren frequently performed as piano soloist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic. The orchestra and Los Angeles Master Chorale premiered many of her works.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1999
In its 36th Music Center season, the Los Angeles Master Chorale, conducted by Music Director Paul Salamunovich, will give nine concerts in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, beginning Oct. 24 with two major choral works, Morten Lauridsen's "Lux Aeterna" and Brahms' "German" Requiem. Soloists in the Brahms work will be Tamara Matthews and Hakan Hagegard. "Choral Treasures From Mexico" is the name of the second concert, to be performed Nov. 19 at 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1994 | LEWIS SEGAL
For its final concert of the season, Sunday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, the Los Angeles Master Chorale and Sinfonia Orchestra ventured a two-part meditation on the ephemeral nature of human happiness: Brahms' "Nanie" and Orff's "Carmina Burana."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Local light or international celebrity, each of the five composers represented on the Los Angeles Master Chorale's latest program was--in one case, is--a prolific writer of music composed in Southern California. Hence the title: "Made in L.A."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1991 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Roger Wagner founded the Los Angeles Master Chorale in 1964. The Music Center hierarchy may have treated the organization as something of a stepchild resident. The eccentricities--egocentricities?--of the feisty director may have caused some ongoing bemusement. Still, few would deny that the chorale was a major cultural asset to the city. Under Wagner, it could make glorious, even uplifting sounds in a rewarding variety of professional contexts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2007 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Among other ideas and projects, Southwest Chamber Music has come up with a new one that definitely hits home -- "The Music of Paradise: Los Angeles From 1915 to 1964." Not a festival or a one-off concert, this is designed to be a series of retrospectives of music made by local hands that will pop up in spots during the next few seasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2009 | Chris Pasles
American baritone Thomas Hampson is singing of a "dusky woman," with a "woolly white and turban'd head, and bare bony feet." That woman is not the usual Romantic figure extolled in lieder recitals, and that's Hampson's point. The woman is a slave, immortalized in a poem by Walt Whitman, in a song by the now utterly forgotten American composer Henry T. Burleigh. She, Burleigh and a host of other obscure American composers are part of America's forgotten heritage. Hampson's mission of late has been to revive it through his touring "Song of America Project," created in collaboration with the Library of Congress.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1994 | Daniel Cariaga, Daniel Cariaga is The Times' music writer.
The state of the national economy regarding the arts, reduced opportunities for dancers and dancemakers and his recent knee surgery might have put choreographer Lar Lubovitch in a deep funk. In fact, all these things, he acknowledges, on the phone from New York, are on his mind. But: "The knee is on the way to a complete recovery." End of subject. And the economy and its impact on artists are constants, to be coped with daily and regularly.
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