Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEliot Feld
IN THE NEWS

Eliot Feld

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1989 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
"It's been 130 years since the Feld Ballet visited Los Angeles," says its namesake and director in a fit of comic hyperbole. "In fact, I think of your city as the Diaspora," he chuckles into the phone at his New York office. Then the punch line: "When we celebrate Pesach (Passover), I always end the seder saying 'Next year in Los Angeles,' not 'Next year in Jerusalem.' " But whatever humor-tinged invocation he gives, Eliot Feld is again bypassing the City of the Angels--racking up a fifth straight seasonal absence.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2006 | Susan Reiter, Special to The Times
HE'S been a feisty, articulate, opinionated and prolific presence in the dance world for nearly 40 years. Ever since emerging as a choreographer in 1967 with two amazingly confident and distinctive works for American Ballet Theatre -- the bracing "Harbinger" and the profound "At Midnight" -- Eliot Feld has followed his own path and created a large repertory of diverse dances (130 and counting) that tend to defy, or redefine, traditional categorization.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Exactly 29 years after his debut as a choreographer, Eliot Feld remains irrepressibly, unpredictably and even recklessly enslaved to the creative spirit. Brilliant experiments with classicism spill from his works, and if his ballets can sometimes seem maddeningly overloaded or arbitrary in movement effects, their inspired, moment-by-moment originality continually reminds you of how formula-ridden most other ballet choreography has become.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the infectious lilt of an Irish folk tune, four dancers strike out on a diagonal in the Segerstrom Studio at St. Joseph Ballet's spanking-new building in Santa Ana. To the foot-tapping "River Dance"-style rhythms, they roll one leg up, shake out their shoulders, flex their arms in scarecrow poses, then lean way back and snap their fingers in supercool clicks. A new group of four bounds out for its turn. Then another, and another . . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1992 | JANICE BERMAN, Janice Berman is the dance critic for New York Newsday
Eliot Feld began making dances while a soloist at American Ballet Theatre, making his choreographic debut in 1967 with "Harbinger," an instant triumph. He was 25. Now, after 25 years of choreographing and nearly 50 years of living, Feld says he still isn't sure when he goes into the studio to choreograph a ballet that he'll actually end up with one. So when Feld began choreographing to Richard Strauss' Four Last Songs, it never occurred to him, he said, to seek the music rights.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2006 | Susan Reiter, Special to The Times
HE'S been a feisty, articulate, opinionated and prolific presence in the dance world for nearly 40 years. Ever since emerging as a choreographer in 1967 with two amazingly confident and distinctive works for American Ballet Theatre -- the bracing "Harbinger" and the profound "At Midnight" -- Eliot Feld has followed his own path and created a large repertory of diverse dances (130 and counting) that tend to defy, or redefine, traditional categorization.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1987 | ROBERT GRESKOVIC
The New York City Ballet will mount a three-week American Music Festival next spring to enlist not only choreographers from the company's extended family but several major modern and post-modern figures as well, it was announced Wednesday. Scheduled for the opening of the company's 40th anniversary season, the American Music Festival will focus on a musical concept like the four company festivals previously directed by the late George Balanchine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the infectious lilt of an Irish folk tune, four dancers strike out on a diagonal in the Segerstrom Studio at St. Joseph Ballet's spanking-new building in Santa Ana. To the foot-tapping "River Dance"-style rhythms, they roll one leg up, shake out their shoulders, flex their arms in scarecrow poses, then lean way back and snap their fingers in supercool clicks. A new group of four bounds out for its turn. Then another, and another . . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Whatever keeps Eliot Feld forever young in his response to the world, to music and to the building blocks of choreography remains one of the happiest secrets of 20th century dance. But plenty of evidence proved the point in the final two programs by the Feld Ballets/NY, Wednesday and Thursday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1989 | EILEEN SONDAK
Although Al Germani Dance Company has made the rounds of low-tech venues over the past year, it has yet to make an official debut on the concert scene. That will change when the San Diego-based troupe performs its "Premiere Concert" at Westminster Church tonight and tomorrow at 8 p.m. Germani, who described the company as a "postmodern contemporary jazz dance troupe," said he founded the group as a proving ground for his own choreographic voice. The transplanted Easterner, with seven years of experience teaching, dancing and choreographing in San Diego, said his approach to dance making emphasizes "the development of expressionistic choreography which reflects as well as affects the social conscience of its viewing audience."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, Chris Pasles is a Times staff writer
New York choreographer, dance company head and teacher Eliot Feld had an epiphany more than a decade ago when he saw a group of third-graders out on a field trip. "They were so animated and excited about going somewhere," Feld said in a phone interview from his dance studios in Manhattan. "It occurred to me that there are hundreds of thousands of elementary school children in New York City, almost none of whom had an opportunity to discover if they had a talent or a passion for dancing."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Whatever keeps Eliot Feld forever young in his response to the world, to music and to the building blocks of choreography remains one of the happiest secrets of 20th century dance. But plenty of evidence proved the point in the final two programs by the Feld Ballets/NY, Wednesday and Thursday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Exactly 29 years after his debut as a choreographer, Eliot Feld remains irrepressibly, unpredictably and even recklessly enslaved to the creative spirit. Brilliant experiments with classicism spill from his works, and if his ballets can sometimes seem maddeningly overloaded or arbitrary in movement effects, their inspired, moment-by-moment originality continually reminds you of how formula-ridden most other ballet choreography has become.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1995 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dance Theatre of Harlem and the Eliot Feld Ballet will make their Orange County Performing Arts Center debuts during the center's expanded 1995-96 dance series, officials announced Tuesday. The Harlem-based troupe will appear Nov. 10-12 in two different mixed bills, with works to be announced. New York-based choreographer Feld will also bring a variety of pieces for his company's performances on April 9-11, 1996.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1992 | JANICE BERMAN, Janice Berman is the dance critic for New York Newsday
Eliot Feld began making dances while a soloist at American Ballet Theatre, making his choreographic debut in 1967 with "Harbinger," an instant triumph. He was 25. Now, after 25 years of choreographing and nearly 50 years of living, Feld says he still isn't sure when he goes into the studio to choreograph a ballet that he'll actually end up with one. So when Feld began choreographing to Richard Strauss' Four Last Songs, it never occurred to him, he said, to seek the music rights.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1989 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
"It's been 130 years since the Feld Ballet visited Los Angeles," says its namesake and director in a fit of comic hyperbole. "In fact, I think of your city as the Diaspora," he chuckles into the phone at his New York office. Then the punch line: "When we celebrate Pesach (Passover), I always end the seder saying 'Next year in Los Angeles,' not 'Next year in Jerusalem.' " But whatever humor-tinged invocation he gives, Eliot Feld is again bypassing the City of the Angels--racking up a fifth straight seasonal absence.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1989 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music/Dance Critic
Eliot Feld--whose company of 21 energetic young dancers opened a rare Southern California engagement at Symphony Hall on Friday--has come a long way since he choreographed "The Consort" in 1970. No one who knows his facile, prolific and provocative output doubts that. The very mixed mixed-bill that served as his calling card here left some doubt, however, as to whether Feld has come a long way forward. By following the inventive antics of "The Consort" with three dutiful genre pieces created in the past four years, it was inadvertently suggested that Feld may have gotten lost in a cutesy maze or stalled in a trendy cul-de-sac.
NEWS
December 5, 1985 | DAVID NELSON
Local balletomanes avowed themselves thankful Nov. 22 that choreographer Eliot Feld likes parties. Feld, the founder and ballet master of the New York dance company that bears his name, was quite literally the star attraction at a frothy little supper given by the San Diego Arts Foundation at the Cuyamaca Club after the troupe's opening night performance at the Civic Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1989 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music/Dance Critic
Eliot Feld--whose company of 21 energetic young dancers opened a rare Southern California engagement at Symphony Hall on Friday--has come a long way since he choreographed "The Consort" in 1970. No one who knows his facile, prolific and provocative output doubts that. The very mixed mixed-bill that served as his calling card here left some doubt, however, as to whether Feld has come a long way forward. By following the inventive antics of "The Consort" with three dutiful genre pieces created in the past four years, it was inadvertently suggested that Feld may have gotten lost in a cutesy maze or stalled in a trendy cul-de-sac.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1989 | EILEEN SONDAK
Although Al Germani Dance Company has made the rounds of low-tech venues over the past year, it has yet to make an official debut on the concert scene. That will change when the San Diego-based troupe performs its "Premiere Concert" at Westminster Church tonight and tomorrow at 8 p.m. Germani, who described the company as a "postmodern contemporary jazz dance troupe," said he founded the group as a proving ground for his own choreographic voice. The transplanted Easterner, with seven years of experience teaching, dancing and choreographing in San Diego, said his approach to dance making emphasizes "the development of expressionistic choreography which reflects as well as affects the social conscience of its viewing audience."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|