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Elisabeth Waldo

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1996 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's musical heritage is sadly neglected, especially around Christmastime. That is the feeling of ethnomusicologist Elisabeth Waldo. So for seven years Waldo has celebrated Noche Buena (Christmas Eve) with a festive production that emphasizes California's Southwestern roots. The event is held at Rancho Cordillera del Norte, the eight-acre ranch she moved to in 1950 with her late husband. The ranch is in Northridge at the corner of Wilbur Avenue and Nordhoff Street.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1996 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's musical heritage is sadly neglected, especially around Christmastime. That is the feeling of ethnomusicologist Elisabeth Waldo. So for seven years Waldo has celebrated Noche Buena (Christmas Eve) with a festive production that emphasizes California's Southwestern roots. The event is held at Rancho Cordillera del Norte, the eight-acre ranch she moved to in 1950 with her late husband. The ranch is in Northridge at the corner of Wilbur Avenue and Nordhoff Street.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1989 | MIKE WYMA
Super Bowl Sunday may seem an inauspicious time to schedule a performance of works as exotic as multi-ethnic music and dance. But Elisabeth Waldo, composer and conductor of "Culture Shock!," has a history of charging ahead with her projects and trusting that an audience will follow. The six-piece program, complete with llama-bone flutes and a variety of other pre-Columbian instruments, will begin at 3 p.m. in the Japan America Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1989 | MIKE WYMA
Super Bowl Sunday may seem an inauspicious time to schedule a performance of works as exotic as multi-ethnic music and dance. But Elisabeth Waldo, composer and conductor of "Culture Shock!," has a history of charging ahead with her projects and trusting that an audience will follow. The six-piece program, complete with llama-bone flutes and a variety of other pre-Columbian instruments, will begin at 3 p.m. in the Japan America Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1989 | LEWIS SEGAL
There was only one culture and absolutely no shock in "Culture Shock!" Sunday afternoon at the Japan America Theatre. Extravagantly billed as "a fusion of music and dance idioms from Indo-Hispanic and Asian cultures," this was a program that used native instruments to garnish lightweight suites resolutely in the European classical tradition.
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, Benjamin Epstein is a free-lance writer who frequently contributes to The Times Orange County Edition. This column is one in an occasional series of looks at ethnic arts and culture in and around Orange County.
Progress is usually defined as an improvement, an advance toward perfection or a better state. In the case of indigenous peoples, however, progress for others has most often meant poverty, disease, despair, and in many cases, cultural extinction for them. "In the past, development meant focusing on growth," said Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, who will speak Sunday at Bowers Museum in Santa Ana as part of United Nations Day celebrations. Sirleaf is assistant administrator of U.N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1994 | SONDRA FARRELL BAZROD
Elisabeth Waldo is trying to bring the mostly forgotten sounds of ancient music to life in the present. Her Northridge home houses a collection of instruments--some 2,000 years old--made of clay, seashells, reed, animal bones, copper, bronze, gold, wood, stone, gourds, deer hoofs and cocoons. Most are percussion and wind instruments and generally are in the shape of animals, birds, humans (as gods) and plants.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL
Frank Guevara serves as producer, artistic director, choreographer and lead dancer for the program by Dance Theatre of East L.A. running at the Nosotros Theatre in Hollywood through Sunday. Guevara's professional background lies solely in the field of commercial dance, and whatever his training or ambitions might be beyond the realm of dance-based TV commercials, music videos, industrial shows and nightclub routines, he keeps relying on tricks of the trade.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1998 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"It's not a very happy ending, but it's better than what usually happens." That's the not-so-big-bad wolf's summing up of his fate in Storybook Theatre's reprise of its sunny version of "Little Red Riding Hood" at Theatre West. The wolf (Jack Kutcher) makes off with his hide intact in this giggle of a musical by Lloyd J.
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | KATHRYN BOLD
The year of the pig--a symbol of prosperity in China--was ushered in by members and supporters of the Pacific Symphony Orchestra's Chinese-American League at a Chinese New Year Celebration on Sunday. About 150 guests, many dressed in red and gold, Chinese colors of good fortune, showed up at the Hyatt Regency Irvine for the league's "Year of the Pig" dinner and dance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1994 | JEFF PRUGH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's an idyllic slice of early California, all but gobbled up by Northridge's suburban growth and suddenly crippled by Mother Nature. Rancho Cordillero del Norte (Ranch of the North Ridge)--once a sheep farm on the sprawling old Mission San Fernando some 200 -years ago--is another casualty of the Northridge earthquake, which has temporarily closed several other historic sites in the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys.
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