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Elizabeth Catlett

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2012 | By Mary Rourke and Valerie J. Nelson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Elizabeth Catlett, a sculptor and printmaker who was widely considered one of the most important African American artists of the 20th century despite having lived most of her life in Mexico, has died. She was 96. Catlett, whose sculptures became symbols of the civil rights movement, died Monday at her home in Cuernavaca, Mexico, said her eldest son, Francisco. Her imposing blend of art and social consciousness mirrored that of German painter Max Beckmann, Mexican muralist Diego Rivera and other artists of the mid-20th century who used art to critique power structures.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2012 | By Mary Rourke and Valerie J. Nelson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Elizabeth Catlett, a sculptor and printmaker who was widely considered one of the most important African American artists of the 20th century despite having lived most of her life in Mexico, has died. She was 96. Catlett, whose sculptures became symbols of the civil rights movement, died Monday at her home in Cuernavaca, Mexico, said her eldest son, Francisco. Her imposing blend of art and social consciousness mirrored that of German painter Max Beckmann, Mexican muralist Diego Rivera and other artists of the mid-20th century who used art to critique power structures.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1999 | LYNELL GEORGE, Lynell George is a Times staff writer
They are arranged as if congregated in an airy grove, or maybe in the shade at a garden party reunion--conversing, or more aptly, testifying about what they've seen, where they've been, where they want to go. Women with strong backs, majestic hips thrust forward, mahogany arms defiantly piercing the air. Men with furrowed brows and strong jaws fashioned from black onyx or bronze. They watch from glass-enclosed cases or perch on pedestals surveying the expanse with seen-it-all eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1999 | LYNELL GEORGE, Lynell George is a Times staff writer
They are arranged as if congregated in an airy grove, or maybe in the shade at a garden party reunion--conversing, or more aptly, testifying about what they've seen, where they've been, where they want to go. Women with strong backs, majestic hips thrust forward, mahogany arms defiantly piercing the air. Men with furrowed brows and strong jaws fashioned from black onyx or bronze. They watch from glass-enclosed cases or perch on pedestals surveying the expanse with seen-it-all eyes.
NEWS
May 21, 1995
Samella Sanders Lewis--one of the most prominent African American art historians--describes her pieces as memories collected in the form of art. Now those works, as well as items from 30 other master artists, will be displayed through an exhibit, "The Samella Lewis Collection--Fifty Years," at the Third World Art Exchange in Los Feliz.
BOOKS
January 2, 1994 | Veronica Chambers, Veronica Chambers is a regular reviewer in the View section
"A History of African Artists: From 1792 to the Present" is a landmark work both in the fields of art history and of African-American studies. As the authors, artist Romare Bearden and writer Harry Henderson, note, previous art history texts have at the most covered only one or two African-American artists. And to judge from some art history texts, the authors marvel, "the first African-American has yet to pick up the brush." This voluminous effort proves this is hardly the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Benjamin Horowitz, influential art dealer who opened his Heritage Gallery in 1961, representing such artists as Charles White, William Gropper and David Alfaro Siqueiros, and a decade later became founding president of the Art Dealers Assn. of California, has died. He was 92. Horowitz died Friday in Los Angeles of natural causes, according to his gallery co-director, Charlotte Sherman.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2006 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
There's a jazz enigma in Los Angeles. Actually, it's one of several -- like why an area overflowing with world-class talent has not yet initiated a program remotely comparable to New York City's Jazz at Lincoln Center. But this particular conundrum is called the Luckman Jazz Orchestra. And it is -- sometimes in actuality, sometimes in potential -- as good a large jazz ensemble as there is, anywhere.
NEWS
February 5, 1995
February is Black History Month. Carter G. Woodson, an African American historian, came up with the idea in 1926 to devote one week to celebrate and study black history and culture. During the American Bicentennial Celebration in 1976 "Negro History Week" was expanded to Black History Month. Here are some local events: * "The Artists' Salute to Black History Month," one of the nation's most extensive exhibits of African American art, which opened Saturday at Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1999
Cornetist and Ornette Coleman associate Bobby Bradford and his quartet--with saxophonist Vinny Golia, bassist Roberto Miranda and drummer Alex Cline--will perform and discuss free jazz at this "History of Jazz Informance," presented by the Thelonoius Monk Institute. * "Free Jazz: A History of Jazz Informance" with Bobby Bradford, Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, 135 N. Grand Ave., 1:30 p.m. Free. (310) 656-4500. 7:30pm / Music Can't get enough divas in your life?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
In 1928, William Nickerson Jr., along with Norman Houston and George Beavers, founded the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Co. in Los Angeles to provide insurance to black people unable to purchase policies from white-owned institutions. The company flourished, evolving into one of the largest black-owned insurance companies west of the Mississippi. Through the years, the company amassed an extensive assemblage of African American art, one of the biggest corporate-owned collections in the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2001
Family A stage-struck young pig yearns for a life in the opera, to the dismay of her farm animal pals, in the premiere of "Figaro . . . Pigaro! A Barnyard Musical," a musical comedy for all ages, written and directed by Falcon Theatre executive producer Meryl Friedman and performed by veterans of stage and screen. * "Figaro . . . Pigaro! A Barnyard Musical," Falcon Theatre, 4252 Riverside Drive, Burbank, 3 p.m. Regular schedule: Saturdays, 1 and 3 p.m.; Sundays 1 p.m. Ends April 1. $10.
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