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March 18, 1990 | SONJA BOLLE
In "Thanksgiving," Elizabeth Cox chronicles the devastating experience of losing her husband, Keith, to AIDS. With unwavering honesty, Cox describes the stages of her grief--shame, anger, nostalgia for lost innocence, fear for their son, Luke--as she confronts the stages of Keith's illness, down to his final decision to end his life. Miraculously, the book is not self-pitying or sentimental, for Cox's account is more than a description of a descent to doom.
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NEWS
March 6, 2001 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Elizabeth Cox has a way of working both sides of the street in this collection of 13 short stories, four of them previously unpublished. She writes of the old and the contemporary South, of comic and violent events, of the power of innocence and the weakness of betrayal. Her specialty is the sexual molestation in which the victim at least partly collaborates. In "Biology," for instance, the 15-year-old narrator, Evie, is seduced by a traveling evangelist who looks like actor Jeff Chandler.
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NEWS
February 7, 1991 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
"The permanence of the marriage was more real than the permanence of this leaving." So it frequently seems to Molly after William tells her one day that he doesn't love her any more. It is the slash of amputation, but, like a beheaded chicken, the organism continues to stagger and flinch. Elizabeth Cox has chosen a title--"The Ragged Way People Fall Out of Love"--that says almost too much about her novel, almost preempting it.
BOOKS
March 4, 2001 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
BARGAINS IN THE REAL WORLD By Elizabeth Cox Random House: 218 pp., $19.95 Elizabeth Cox's writing in these 13 stories has a quiet well-mannered self-assurance a reader seldom sees. Odd to think that writing, like people, can have good or bad manners. Well-mannered writing is gracious and helpful. The timing is synchronous with the meaning. Nothing shouts at you. The style is quiet. The author is a conduit, a flute, an instrument played by mysterious natural, cultural and intellectual winds.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Divorce Filing: Director Oliver Stone's wife, Elizabeth, has filed for divorce in Los Angeles Superior Court. The Stones were married June 6, 1981, and separated on Sunday, according to Elizabeth Stone's petition. She seeks custody of the couple's sons, Sean, 8, and Michael, 1, with visitation rights for Stone. The petition also seeks child support and alimony payments. The former Elizabeth Cox was Stone's assistant on "The Hand."
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | LINELL SMITH, THE BALTIMORE EVENING SUN
A few weeks ago, Luke Avedon's teacher suggested he bring his mother's book to "Show and Tell." The boy told his 5-year-old friends that his mom had written "Thanksgiving" about his daddy. He told them it was a book about how his daddy died from AIDS. "I'm so glad he's in a school like that. And I'm so proud he can be proud," author Elizabeth Cox says. "Thanksgiving," published by Harper & Row, is Cox's first book.
BOOKS
March 4, 2001 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
BARGAINS IN THE REAL WORLD By Elizabeth Cox Random House: 218 pp., $19.95 Elizabeth Cox's writing in these 13 stories has a quiet well-mannered self-assurance a reader seldom sees. Odd to think that writing, like people, can have good or bad manners. Well-mannered writing is gracious and helpful. The timing is synchronous with the meaning. Nothing shouts at you. The style is quiet. The author is a conduit, a flute, an instrument played by mysterious natural, cultural and intellectual winds.
NEWS
March 6, 2001 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Elizabeth Cox has a way of working both sides of the street in this collection of 13 short stories, four of them previously unpublished. She writes of the old and the contemporary South, of comic and violent events, of the power of innocence and the weakness of betrayal. Her specialty is the sexual molestation in which the victim at least partly collaborates. In "Biology," for instance, the 15-year-old narrator, Evie, is seduced by a traveling evangelist who looks like actor Jeff Chandler.
NEWS
August 12, 1999 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
NBA Hall-of-Famer Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, who took a job this year as assistant basketball coach at Alchesay High School on the White Mountain Indian Reservation in northeastern Arizona, has listed his Beverly Hills-area home at $3.8 million. The former Lakers center, who became the NBA all-time leading scorer in 1984, co-wrote the book "Black Profiles in Courage" (William Morrow, 1996), and he wrote the bestsellers "Kareem" (1990) and "Giant Steps" (1983).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Divorce Filing: Director Oliver Stone's wife, Elizabeth, has filed for divorce in Los Angeles Superior Court. The Stones were married June 6, 1981, and separated on Sunday, according to Elizabeth Stone's petition. She seeks custody of the couple's sons, Sean, 8, and Michael, 1, with visitation rights for Stone. The petition also seeks child support and alimony payments. The former Elizabeth Cox was Stone's assistant on "The Hand."
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
"The permanence of the marriage was more real than the permanence of this leaving." So it frequently seems to Molly after William tells her one day that he doesn't love her any more. It is the slash of amputation, but, like a beheaded chicken, the organism continues to stagger and flinch. Elizabeth Cox has chosen a title--"The Ragged Way People Fall Out of Love"--that says almost too much about her novel, almost preempting it.
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | LINELL SMITH, THE BALTIMORE EVENING SUN
A few weeks ago, Luke Avedon's teacher suggested he bring his mother's book to "Show and Tell." The boy told his 5-year-old friends that his mom had written "Thanksgiving" about his daddy. He told them it was a book about how his daddy died from AIDS. "I'm so glad he's in a school like that. And I'm so proud he can be proud," author Elizabeth Cox says. "Thanksgiving," published by Harper & Row, is Cox's first book. It is a grimly honest journal of the last year and a half of life with her husband, New York musician Keith Avedon.
BOOKS
March 18, 1990 | SONJA BOLLE
In "Thanksgiving," Elizabeth Cox chronicles the devastating experience of losing her husband, Keith, to AIDS. With unwavering honesty, Cox describes the stages of her grief--shame, anger, nostalgia for lost innocence, fear for their son, Luke--as she confronts the stages of Keith's illness, down to his final decision to end his life. Miraculously, the book is not self-pitying or sentimental, for Cox's account is more than a description of a descent to doom.
TRAVEL
March 26, 2006 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
ROSEWOOD Hotels & Resorts, whose 13 world properties include the celebrity hideaway Las Ventanas al Paraiso in Los Cabos, Mexico (think Babs, Arnold and J.Lo), is spreading its glitz across the American land. In the last six months, the Dallas-based company, which bills itself as "ultra-luxury," has added two U.S. hotels to its portfolio, and it's about to open another: Acqualina, a 51-story Mediterranean high-rise in Sunny Isles Beach, Fla., about halfway between Miami and Fort Lauderdale.
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