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Elizabeth Edwards

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2009 | Scott Martelle
Let's face it. Most people who pick up this short but surprisingly deep memoir by Elizabeth Edwards, the wife of former presidential candidate John Edwards, are looking for one thing and one thing only -- the dirt on his infidelity with videographer Rielle Hunter. And it's here, though sparingly. In fact, the strength of this book lies in how little of it actually has to do with John Edwards' caddish behavior.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Rielle Hunter is sorry. Very, very sorry. Extremely, lots of, super sorry. And then some. Because that's how sorry you have to be when it's years after the fact? Hunter, infamous for her affair with then-presidential hopeful John Edwards, an affair that started in 2006 and was uncovered in 2007, has a book coming out, "In Hindsight, What Really Happened: The Revised Edition: John Edwards, Our Daughter and Me. " To mark the occasion she wrote an essay for Huffington Post admitting her regrets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2010 | James Rainey
There still appears to be a sizable minority in America who favors big news organizations at least in part for their broad ambitions, thoroughness, balance and sense of restraint. But ain't it a shame when those highfalutin', old-school intentions get in the way of the basic mission -- delivering the audience a "Hey Martha!" scoop now and then with their breakfast cereal? It seems the higher values and a healthy dose of old-fashioned incredulity (Could he really be that big a cad?
NATIONAL
June 26, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Rielle Hunter probably won't have America's shoulder to cry on after announcing today on ABC's "Good Morning America" that she and former presidential candidate John Edwards broke up just days ago. "We are a family, but as of the end of last week, John Edwards and I are no longer a couple," Hunter said on the program. Hunter has been in the public eye of late due to her new memoir, "What Really Happened: John Edwards, Our Daughter and Me. " It details her controversial affair with Edwards while his wife, Elizabeth, was slowly losing her battle to cancer.
NEWS
December 8, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
Elizabeth Edwards, wife of former presidential candidate John Edwards, died Tuesday and is now being remembered for the determination she showed in her battle against breast cancer. Columnist Nicole Brochu of the South Florida Sun-Sentinel writes of Edwards, who had been open about discussing her illness ever since she was diagnosed in 2004: "Even in her last days, according to the 'Today Show,' when she made the difficult decision to stop treatment for a disease that was ravaging other parts of her body, she told friends she didn't want to be thought of as someone who 'lost' her battle with cancer, but as someone who succeeded in living a good life.
OPINION
December 11, 2010
Defining 'marriage' Re "Judges explore narrow options in Prop. 8 appeal," Dec. 7 Can we please dismiss the false argument that "marriage" is a word of exclusively religious meaning? City clerks and justices of the peace perform civil marriages with no religious rites. Atheists marry without any complaint from the religious. Freedom of religion is harmed more by the status quo than by allowing same-sex marriage. If your religion doesn't approve of same-sex marriage, it will never have to bless any such unions.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Elizabeth Edwards said Wednesday that she felt she had let down her family and the country by neglecting to get mammograms that could have caught her cancer earlier. Edwards -- appearing with her husband, Democratic presidential hopeful John Edwards, in their first trip to Iowa since announcing her cancer had returned -- admonished women to get mammograms.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2009 | JAMES RAINEY
The coverage of Elizabeth Edwards' week-old book and her promotional tour leaves us with two competing portraits. Is she (a) the valiant victim finally having her say for those who don't have a voice? Or (b) the unlikely opportunist, exacting revenge against her wayward husband and dragging her family back into the muck? Over two presidential campaigns and a public battle with cancer, John Edwards' wife mostly benefited from the media's predilection for a single narrative.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2004 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Voters usually don't have to listen very closely to hear John Edwards talk about his family. At virtually every campaign stop from his boyhood home in Robbins, N.C., to Universal City, the North Carolina senator trumpets his humble origins as the son of a textile millworker, the first of his clan to attend college.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2004 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
She was making her first campaign foray into California in a round-the-clock race to help her husband's Democratic presidential bid. But Elizabeth Edwards did it her way, and that meant low-key. She landed here Thursday on a commercial jet. Alone. There were no frills, no handlers, no pushy PR types. Just the down-to-earth and highly independent other half of Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina. Wherever she goes, she deals with The Question.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Disgraced politician John Edwards had his say , though not on the witness stand. Andrew and Cheri Young had their say , in court, in print and, possibly, in an Aaron Sorkin movie. Before she died of breast cancer in December 2010, Elizabeth Edwards had her say, in a memoir she called “Resilience.” The government had its say , when it unsuccessfully prosecuted Edwards for misuse of campaign funds. And the people spoke as well, when a jury acquitted Edwards on one count of campaign finance violations and deadlocked on five others.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By David Zucchino
DURHAM, N.C. - A year after indicting former Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards on campaign finance fraud charges, the Justice Department on Wednesday dismissed all remaining charges against the former North Carolina senator. The dismissal came 13 days after a federal jury in Greensboro, N.C., acquitted Edwards of one felony charge and deadlocked on five others, prompting a mistrial. Jurors later said prosecutors did not offer convincing evidence that Edwards had used campaign donations to hide his pregnant mistress and save his campaign for the 2008 presidential nomination from scandal.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
GREENSBORO, N.C. - The Justice Department's attempt to convict John Edwards of campaign finance fraud failed Thursday, with a federal jury rejecting the complex felony case against him. But minutes later, Edwards himself delivered an abject confession and apology on the courthouse steps with his family at his side. "While I do not believe I ever did anything illegal … I've done an awful, awful lot that was wrong," Edwards said after jurors found him not guilty of one charge of violating federal election laws.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
GREENSBORO, N.C. — For a fourth day Wednesday, the jury in the John Edwards trial deliberated without reaching a verdict in a case focused on an illicit affair and federal campaign finance laws. The jury of eight men and four women must decide whether Edwards violated election laws when payments from two wealthy donors were used to cover up his affair with videographer Rielle Hunter during Edwards' failed run for the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination. Prosecutors contend that Edwards solicited $925,000 in illegal contributions from the donors in order to hide the affair and keep his campaign from collapsing in scandal.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
GREENSBORO, N.C. — Jurors in the John Edwards campaign finance trial on Thursday ended a fifth day of deliberations without reaching a verdict, but not before requesting 20 exhibits involving payments from one of two wealthy benefactors at the heart of the case. The jury reviewed invoices for payments by the late Fred Baron, Edwards' campaign finance chairman, that helped hide Edwards' mistress at luxury hotels and resorts. The only defense exhibit requested was a chart of payments from Baron and Rachel "Bunny" Mellon, a billionaire heiress, during Edwards' campaign for the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
GREENSBORO, N.C. — A federal jury in the political corruption trial of former presidential candidate John Edwards deliberated for a second day Monday without reaching a verdict, as Edwards quietly awaited his fate inside a federal courthouse. The jury of eight men and four women requested seven prosecution exhibits. Among them were emails in 2006 and 2007 that discussed $725,000 provided to Edwards by wealthy heiress and supporter Rachel "Bunny" Mellon, now 101, during Edwards' campaign for the 2008 Democratic nomination.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2009 | Associated Press
Elizabeth Edwards writes in a memoir being published this month that news of her husband's affair made her vomit in a bathroom. "I cried and screamed, I went to the bathroom and threw up," Edwards, 59, writes in her book, "Resilience." Edwards says her husband, John, admitted the betrayal just days after declaring in 2006 that he would seek the Democratic presidential nomination. She says she wanted him to drop out to protect the family from media scrutiny, but stood by his side anyway.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2008 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
Elizabeth Edwards, the wife of former Democratic presidential contender John Edwards, said she and John McCain have one thing in common: "Neither one of us would be covered by his health policy." Edwards lodged her criticism of the presumptive Republican presidential nominee's proposal Saturday at the annual meeting of the Assn. of Health Care Journalists. Under McCain's plan, insurance companies "wouldn't have to cover preexisting conditions like melanoma and breast cancer," she said.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
GREENSBORO, N.C. - Both sides in the John Edwards trial gave detailed closing arguments Thursday to a federal jury that will decide whether the former presidential candidate knowingly violated campaign finance laws in a scheme to hide an extramarital affair. Prosecutors told jurors that testimony and evidence in the nearly four-week trial prove that Edwards solicited and orchestrated secret payments of $925,000 from two wealthy benefactors to save his campaign for the 2008 Democratic nomination from scandal.
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