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Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey

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BOOKS
February 3, 1991 | Judith Freeman, Freeman is the author of "The Chinchilla Farm," a novel that recently has been reissued in paperback by vintage
One would think, given the magnitude of the problem of homelessness in this country today, that the subject would have leaked its way into fiction. But American fiction in the last decade seemed to follow the minimalist path all the way to the bank, by way of middle-class concerns. The thinking among writers here seems to be, you have to live under a totalitarian system before you encounter social problems serious enough to write about.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1998 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN
Calendar Weekend asked several Festival of Books authors: "What author would you like to meet at the festival?" Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey ("A Woman of Independent Means"): "Isabel Allende. I'm teaching a course at Hollins College [in Virginia] called Autobiographical Sources of Fiction. We began reading her extraordinary book about her daughter, which tells the story really of how she came to write 'The House of the Spirits.'
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NEWS
May 4, 1995 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With over 300 members, the Ventura County Writers Club is the most active writers organization from San Luis Obispo to Los Angeles. The club's May meeting features Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey, best-selling author of "A Woman of Independent Means" and "Joanna's Husband and David's Wife." She will talk about her experiences as a screenwriter and novelist. The meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Orchid Professional Building, 816 Camarillo Springs Road, Camarillo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey, author of "A Woman of Independent Means" and "Joanna's Husband and David's Wife," has called Studio City home for 30 years. Hailey and her late husband, the playwright Oliver Hailey, bought a ranch house in 1967, after moving here to see Oliver's play "Who's Happy Now?" performed during the inaugural season of the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles. These days, the author divides her time between Southern California and the south coast of England.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1995 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shakespeare and Proust may have waxed lyrical about the "remembrance of things past," but novelist Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey and her late husband, playwright Oliver Hailey, looked for ways to bring it back on the page and stage. The author of the 1978 bestseller "A Woman of Independent Means," a work based on her own family history, Forsythe Hailey is also responsible for several other semi-autobiographical books.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1998 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN
Calendar Weekend asked several Festival of Books authors: "What author would you like to meet at the festival?" Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey ("A Woman of Independent Means"): "Isabel Allende. I'm teaching a course at Hollins College [in Virginia] called Autobiographical Sources of Fiction. We began reading her extraordinary book about her daughter, which tells the story really of how she came to write 'The House of the Spirits.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey, author of "A Woman of Independent Means" and "Joanna's Husband and David's Wife," has called Studio City home for 30 years. Hailey and her late husband, the playwright Oliver Hailey, bought a ranch house in 1967, after moving here to see Oliver's play "Who's Happy Now?" performed during the inaugural season of the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles. These days, the author divides her time between Southern California and the south coast of England.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"People are probably more embarrassed for us than we are for ourselves--because we know what really happened," said Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey of her two-character comedy-drama, "Joanna's Husband and David's Wife" (opening tonight at the Pasadena Playhouse), a semi-autobiographical account of her 29-year marriage to playwright Oliver Hailey. "The truth is, I've taken great liberties." She describes her story as "the drama that begins after 'happily ever after.'
BOOKS
March 23, 1986 | Shelby Hearon, Hearon's latest novel is "A Small Town" (Atheneum)
When Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey's best-selling first novel, "A Woman of Independent Means" was published, I sent my mother and aunt each a copy. One of them wrote back, "What a selfish woman!" the other, "How smart and strong she was!" This same aim on the part of the author--very recognizable and real behavior presented so that it can be taken either as good or bad on the part of the reader--forms the basis of Hailey's new novel, "Joanna's Husband and David's Wife."
BOOKS
April 13, 1986
Having just recently re-read Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey's new novel, "Joanna's Husband and David's Wife," I glommed onto the review which ran in the March 23 Book Review section. And while I do not think that Shelby Hearon's review is bad, I just don't think it is important enough or thorough enough for this inspired book. Hearon, is, after all, a published author, and perhaps the book does not speak to her as it speaks to the thousands of us--emerging house-wives--with unpublished and unproduced creative dreams of our own. ANN RAYMOND Tehachapi, Calif.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With over 300 members, the Ventura County Writers Club is the most active writers organization from San Luis Obispo to Los Angeles. The club's May meeting features Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey, best-selling author of "A Woman of Independent Means" and "Joanna's Husband and David's Wife." She will talk about her experiences as a screenwriter and novelist. The meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Orchid Professional Building, 816 Camarillo Springs Road, Camarillo.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1995 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shakespeare and Proust may have waxed lyrical about the "remembrance of things past," but novelist Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey and her late husband, playwright Oliver Hailey, looked for ways to bring it back on the page and stage. The author of the 1978 bestseller "A Woman of Independent Means," a work based on her own family history, Forsythe Hailey is also responsible for several other semi-autobiographical books.
BOOKS
February 3, 1991 | Judith Freeman, Freeman is the author of "The Chinchilla Farm," a novel that recently has been reissued in paperback by vintage
One would think, given the magnitude of the problem of homelessness in this country today, that the subject would have leaked its way into fiction. But American fiction in the last decade seemed to follow the minimalist path all the way to the bank, by way of middle-class concerns. The thinking among writers here seems to be, you have to live under a totalitarian system before you encounter social problems serious enough to write about.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"People are probably more embarrassed for us than we are for ourselves--because we know what really happened," said Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey of her two-character comedy-drama, "Joanna's Husband and David's Wife" (opening tonight at the Pasadena Playhouse), a semi-autobiographical account of her 29-year marriage to playwright Oliver Hailey. "The truth is, I've taken great liberties." She describes her story as "the drama that begins after 'happily ever after.'
BOOKS
March 23, 1986 | Shelby Hearon, Hearon's latest novel is "A Small Town" (Atheneum)
When Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey's best-selling first novel, "A Woman of Independent Means" was published, I sent my mother and aunt each a copy. One of them wrote back, "What a selfish woman!" the other, "How smart and strong she was!" This same aim on the part of the author--very recognizable and real behavior presented so that it can be taken either as good or bad on the part of the reader--forms the basis of Hailey's new novel, "Joanna's Husband and David's Wife."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1986 | BETTY LUKAS
"A Woman of Independent Means." Newman/Dove. What constantly impresses the listener is Barbara Rush's agile voice. It sounds as if it actually ages in this endearing, evocative and ultimately heart-rending life story of an imperious Texas matron told via letters she wrote to significant people in her life. Here, as onstage, Rush's vivid reading of Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey's best-selling portrait of her grandmother is a tour de force.
BOOKS
May 19, 1991
You are to be commended for giving generous space to the question of letter writing! Kenneth Zimmerman certainly holds his own, and I, for one, hope that ultimately some recognition will be given to letter-writing as a respectable genre of its own. And why not? After all, we had as a best-seller a novel composed entirely of letters: Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey's "A Woman of Independent Means." A. R. Gurney's delightful play, "Love Letters," which opened last year, has been extended for an indefinite run with impressive casts reading letters back and forth to each other.
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