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Elizabeth G Hill

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1998
Last summer, with Pete Wilson boasting that the California economy was a rocket taking off, the Republican governor and Democrats in the Legislature indulged in a mini-orgy of spending on tax cuts and new programs. The state treasury was bursting with unexpected revenues. Wilson's advisors sought to minimize the impact of the Asian fiscal crisis on the California economy. And when Wilson finally signed the state budget into law, he said beamingly that he was leaving his successor a $2.5-billion budget reserve, the biggest in years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2008 | GEORGE SKELTON
One outfit that unquestionably earns its pay in Sacramento is the Legislative Analyst's Office, led by the "Budget Nun," Elizabeth G. Hill. Hill is paid $170,100 to run a 57-person office costing taxpayers $7.2 million. The public more than gets its money's worth. Her words are the bible on fiscal affairs, a source of truth amid Capitol hype, spin and prevarication. Lawmakers can take her advice or reject it, but they know it's given straight, without a political agenda.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2007 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's assertion that his budget plan would wipe out California's chronic multibillion-dollar deficit was met with skepticism on Friday from the state's nonpartisan budget analyst, who said the proposal would probably fall short of that goal. Legislative Analyst Elizabeth G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2007 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's assertion that his budget plan would wipe out California's chronic multibillion-dollar deficit was met with skepticism on Friday from the state's nonpartisan budget analyst, who said the proposal would probably fall short of that goal. Legislative Analyst Elizabeth G.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An ambitious plan by California State University System officials to construct five new campuses should be scrapped because enrollment estimates are "unrealistically high," state Legislative Analyst Elizabeth G. Hill told the Legislature on Wednesday. She also criticized a pay raise for CSU's chancellor and took a swipe at University of California expansion plans. Hill, the Legislature's highly influential nonpartisan budget adviser, made the assessments in a review of Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2008 | GEORGE SKELTON
One outfit that unquestionably earns its pay in Sacramento is the Legislative Analyst's Office, led by the "Budget Nun," Elizabeth G. Hill. Hill is paid $170,100 to run a 57-person office costing taxpayers $7.2 million. The public more than gets its money's worth. Her words are the bible on fiscal affairs, a source of truth amid Capitol hype, spin and prevarication. Lawmakers can take her advice or reject it, but they know it's given straight, without a political agenda.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a report sure to increase pressure for higher taxes, the Legislature's nonpartisan analyst said Wednesday that the gap between state revenues and expenditures has widened to nearly $10 billion and that Gov. Pete Wilson's budget estimates "significantly underestimate" the magnitude of the problem. Wilson and analysts in the Department of Finance had built the $55.
NEWS
November 17, 1995 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's independent legislative analyst Elizabeth Hill on Thursday issued a qualified but generally rosy assessment of the state's financial future, crediting rising revenues and declining welfare rolls as major factors in restoring fiscal health to state government.
OPINION
February 25, 2008
Re "State analyst offers own formula on budget gap" and "A take-no-prisoners approach to budget," column, Feb. 21 Legislative Analyst Elizabeth G. Hill is a state treasure. Fern Seizer Beverly Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1993
The state legislative analyst's office has concluded that the Los Angeles Unified School District has adequately accounted for a $400-million budget shortfall, despite a state report last month that said $73 million of the deficit could not be identified. In a letter to state Senate Leader David A. Roberti (D-Van Nuys), legislative analyst Elizabeth G. Hill said that differences between a report prepared by her office in December and a response by the district this month have been reconciled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1998
Last summer, with Pete Wilson boasting that the California economy was a rocket taking off, the Republican governor and Democrats in the Legislature indulged in a mini-orgy of spending on tax cuts and new programs. The state treasury was bursting with unexpected revenues. Wilson's advisors sought to minimize the impact of the Asian fiscal crisis on the California economy. And when Wilson finally signed the state budget into law, he said beamingly that he was leaving his successor a $2.5-billion budget reserve, the biggest in years.
NEWS
November 17, 1995 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's independent legislative analyst Elizabeth Hill on Thursday issued a qualified but generally rosy assessment of the state's financial future, crediting rising revenues and declining welfare rolls as major factors in restoring fiscal health to state government.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a report sure to increase pressure for higher taxes, the Legislature's nonpartisan analyst said Wednesday that the gap between state revenues and expenditures has widened to nearly $10 billion and that Gov. Pete Wilson's budget estimates "significantly underestimate" the magnitude of the problem. Wilson and analysts in the Department of Finance had built the $55.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An ambitious plan by California State University System officials to construct five new campuses should be scrapped because enrollment estimates are "unrealistically high," state Legislative Analyst Elizabeth G. Hill told the Legislature on Wednesday. She also criticized a pay raise for CSU's chancellor and took a swipe at University of California expansion plans. Hill, the Legislature's highly influential nonpartisan budget adviser, made the assessments in a review of Gov.
OPINION
March 4, 2008
Re "Gov. wants to cut back tax breaks," Feb. 29 Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's decision to endorse the recommendations of Legislative Analyst Elizabeth G. Hill is the type of action we need in a leader. He reconsidered his earlier position and is now coming to the table with an open mind. We have not just a spending problem but a revenue problem, and the proposed cuts for education cannot stand. Yet already Republican leaders in the Legislature say votes will not be available for any plans to eliminate tax breaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1999
In the late summer of 1998, Democratic legislative leaders and Republican Gov. Pete Wilson fought over how to spend a giant state budget surplus. Wilson insisted on a big cut in the state's vehicle license fee, the annual tax on autos paid at registration time. The Democrats wanted to spend more money on the schools. Ultimately, a deal was made to end a long budget stalemate. The car tax was reduced permanently by 25%, beginning this year.
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