Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsElizabeth Gaskell
IN THE NEWS

Elizabeth Gaskell

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2000 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's hard to accuse television of being an instrument of dumbing down when it stimulates thousands of people to seek out the works of a substantial but neglected 19th century author. You think such an achievement is beyond television? It actually happened recently in Britain. In November, a four-part BBC costume drama adapted from the obscure 1864 novel "Wives and Daughters," by Elizabeth Gaskell, won high audience ratings and spurred large numbers of viewers to read the original.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2000 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's hard to accuse television of being an instrument of dumbing down when it stimulates thousands of people to seek out the works of a substantial but neglected 19th century author. You think such an achievement is beyond television? It actually happened recently in Britain. In November, a four-part BBC costume drama adapted from the obscure 1864 novel "Wives and Daughters," by Elizabeth Gaskell, won high audience ratings and spurred large numbers of viewers to read the original.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 23, 1990
Coke will soon start paying consumers to drink Coca-Cola Classic. The company has unveiled "Magician," a promotion in which currency in denominations of $1 to $100 will pop out of unmarked cans of Coca-Cola Classic. Coke says it will spend $100 million to advertise, promote and pay for the promotion, which begins in May and will be the biggest in Coke history.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2010 | By ROBERT LLOYD, Television Critic
So, they have taken that Alicia Silverstone movie "Clueless" and turned it into a miniseries called "Emma," set in England in the early 1800s, and, what's more, they've issued a novelization by someone named Jane Austen. There is a lot more talking in the book, but it is really quite well done and covers all the major points of the miniseries, which is also excellent. They really capture that original "Clueless" spirit. Or perhaps I have that backward. Hang on while I Wikipedia that.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2001 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
What is it about the English and good costume drama? They create it with as much arresting pomp as U.S. television does, say, an Academy Awards telecast: lots of speeches and wardrobe choices that are alien to the present century. The differences are that everything said on an Oscar show appears mannered and everything worn borrowed for the evening, in contrast with how Brits usually tackle history by fitting into their period roles and attire effortlessly, as if born to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2010 | By MARY McNAMARA, Television Critic
If you need proof that Americans are different from Brits, you need look no further than "Cranford."(TV_series) The star-studded series -- Judi Dench, Eileen Atkins, Imelda Staunton, Jonathan Pryce -- based on the slim 19th century novels of Elizabeth Gaskell, followed the adventures of a tiny market town in Cheshire. Full of as many frilly bonnets and quaint platitudes as fine performances, "Cranford" aired in 2007 in the U.K., where it not only was lauded by critics, it was a smash hit, averaging close to 8 million viewers for each of its five parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2010 | By Susan King
Judi Dench reprises her Emmy-nominated role as the kind-hearted Miss Matty Jenkyns in "Return to Cranford," which premieres Sunday on PBS' "Masterpiece Classic." But she did double duty on the sequel to 2008's "Cranford" -- the Oscar-winning actress also supplied the squawks of a parrot. Dench recalls the bird wasn't available to dub in some chirps the microphone didn't pick up during the production on the two-part drama. "I said I was in the scene and I knew exactly what he said that day," she says, laughing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
In making the Victorian-era miniseries "Cranford," actress Judi Dench was reminded of her youth in wartime England. Though separated by nearly a century, the two time periods shared a common spirit. "You did look after your neighbors," said the Oscar-winning Dench, who plays Miss Matty on the PBS program that premieres Sunday. "They certainly looked after their neighbors in 'Cranford' . . . there is something touching about knowing what people are like and knowing the situation that's going on."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2009 | By Jane Smiley
A few months ago, a reader sent me an edition of Anthony Trollope's "The Claverings" printed in the United States in 1866. It weighs a pound and has about 210,000 words and 210 glossy pages, with an eight-point typeface. Even though I always choose Trollope for enjoyment over any other author, I couldn't read it. Maybe I needed to have spent years scouring the Bible to be able to track small print in two columns, or, for that matter, to keep a heavy book from falling into the bathtub. But I have been spoiled by the paperback, one of the great unheralded inventions of the 20th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2008 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
It's been a good run on "Masterpiece Classic," which began in January with the start of a complete Jane Austen and ends this month with the three-part "Cranford," so it's only fitting for the series to go out with a bang. Or if not a bang, than a suitably stoic and subtle celebration of the tensions between passions and propriety, tradition and ambition that make 19th century Britain so fascinating to all us modern folk.
OPINION
March 26, 2004 | Lucasta Miller
The response to the film "Sylvia," recently out in Britain, was marked by some extraordinary invective. Although critics were engaged by the popular retelling of Sylvia Plath's tragic story, they seemed compelled to deride her poetry as adolescent and overrated. Similarly, every filmgoer and memoir addict now knows about Iris Murdoch's Alzheimer's, but hardly anyone will confess to having read her novels.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|