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Elizabeth Hill

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NEWS
January 30, 2000 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chances are you've never heard of Elizabeth Hill. Even some of her bosses--the 120 members of the state Legislature--have trouble remembering her name. But don't be fooled by that low profile, because the numbers and words flowing out of Hill's office change policy, challenge budgets and sometimes drive California governors blind with rage.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2008 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
California's budget shortfall has swollen from $14.5 billion to $16 billion, according to the Legislature's chief fiscal analyst, who said the governor's proposal for closing the deficit is so inadequate that her office took the rare step of drafting an alternate plan for lawmakers to consider. The proposal by Legislative Analyst Elizabeth G. Hill, to whom lawmakers of both parties look for advice on fiscal matters, called on lawmakers to raise taxes by at least $2.7 billion.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2003 | Evan Halper, Jeffrey L. Rabin and Dan Morain, Times Staff Writers
California's nonpartisan legislative analyst confirmed Wednesday that the budget submitted by Gov. Gray Davis could resolve the state fiscal crisis, but she also laid out an extensive menu of alternative cuts and tax hikes for lawmakers to consider. Davis applauded the report from Legislative Analyst Elizabeth Hill, saying that it validates the plan he offered in January to close what he describes as a $34.6-billion shortfall over the coming 17 months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2007 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
The Legislature's chief budget analyst warned lawmakers Wednesday that an unexpected dip in tax revenues, along with a number of overly optimistic assumptions in Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's budget, leaves the state facing a much larger fiscal problem than the governor's spending plan reflects. Nonpartisan Legislative Analyst Elizabeth G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2005 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's proposal for tough state spending controls is flawed and could force dramatic cuts in programs least able to sustain them while leaving others unscathed, according to the nonpartisan legislative analyst. In a report released Wednesday, analyst Elizabeth G. Hill, whom lawmakers of both parties look to for guidance on fiscal matters, said her office has "serious concerns" with the governor's proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2006 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's proposed budget "moves the state in the wrong direction" by adding billions to the deficit, the state's budget analyst said Thursday, and the bold public works plan he announced last week relies on money that may never materialize. "We're expanding spending at a time when we have a significant state budget problem," said nonpartisan Legislative Analyst Elizabeth G. Hill, to whom lawmakers of both parties look for advice on such matters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2007 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
The Legislature's chief budget analyst warned lawmakers Wednesday that an unexpected dip in tax revenues, along with a number of overly optimistic assumptions in Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's budget, leaves the state facing a much larger fiscal problem than the governor's spending plan reflects. Nonpartisan Legislative Analyst Elizabeth G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2008 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
California's budget shortfall has swollen from $14.5 billion to $16 billion, according to the Legislature's chief fiscal analyst, who said the governor's proposal for closing the deficit is so inadequate that her office took the rare step of drafting an alternate plan for lawmakers to consider. The proposal by Legislative Analyst Elizabeth G. Hill, to whom lawmakers of both parties look for advice on fiscal matters, called on lawmakers to raise taxes by at least $2.7 billion.
OPINION
February 25, 2008
Re "State analyst offers own formula on budget gap" and "A take-no-prisoners approach to budget," column, Feb. 21 Legislative Analyst Elizabeth G. Hill is a state treasure. Fern Seizer Beverly Hills
OPINION
February 24, 2004
Re "Gas Tax Hike for Roadwork Urged," Feb. 19: Let me see if I have this straight. State government has siphoned off much of the current 18-cent-per-gallon tax money to the general fund. Therefore we should increase the tax by 6 cents per gallon to pay for the road improvements that should have been done with the 18-cent-per-gallon money. I think not. I am amused that state Legislative Analyst Elizabeth Hill thinks the public is gullible enough to fall for that. David R. Gillespie Bonita
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2006 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's proposed budget "moves the state in the wrong direction" by adding billions to the deficit, the state's budget analyst said Thursday, and the bold public works plan he announced last week relies on money that may never materialize. "We're expanding spending at a time when we have a significant state budget problem," said nonpartisan Legislative Analyst Elizabeth G. Hill, to whom lawmakers of both parties look for advice on such matters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2005 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's proposal for tough state spending controls is flawed and could force dramatic cuts in programs least able to sustain them while leaving others unscathed, according to the nonpartisan legislative analyst. In a report released Wednesday, analyst Elizabeth G. Hill, whom lawmakers of both parties look to for guidance on fiscal matters, said her office has "serious concerns" with the governor's proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2003 | Evan Halper, Jeffrey L. Rabin and Dan Morain, Times Staff Writers
California's nonpartisan legislative analyst confirmed Wednesday that the budget submitted by Gov. Gray Davis could resolve the state fiscal crisis, but she also laid out an extensive menu of alternative cuts and tax hikes for lawmakers to consider. Davis applauded the report from Legislative Analyst Elizabeth Hill, saying that it validates the plan he offered in January to close what he describes as a $34.6-billion shortfall over the coming 17 months.
NEWS
January 30, 2000 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chances are you've never heard of Elizabeth Hill. Even some of her bosses--the 120 members of the state Legislature--have trouble remembering her name. But don't be fooled by that low profile, because the numbers and words flowing out of Hill's office change policy, challenge budgets and sometimes drive California governors blind with rage.
OPINION
December 13, 2004
Re "Gov.'s Deal May Worsen Fund Crisis," Dec 8: California's projected budget gap for the coming fiscal year is $6.7 billion. Elizabeth Hill, the state's legislative analyst, estimates the deficit could be close to $10 billion in budget year 2006-07 without cuts, tax increases or a combination of the two. How then in good conscience can Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger even consider calling a special election in 2005, which could cost taxpayers as...
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Speaker Willie Brown and other Democratic Assembly leaders want to stop funding the legislative analyst's office after June 30, leaving the fate of the independent state budget monitoring agency in serious question. "It's a decision on the part of the leadership that they could not afford to keep (the analyst's office) . . . and afford to do the other things the Legislature has to do," said Bob Connelly, chief administrative officer of the Assembly Rules Committee.
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