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Elizabeth Hoefner

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August 26, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Time is of the essence for dancer-choreographer Elizabeth Hoefner. So much so that for one of her solos, she is festooned with nearly 100 wristwatches and constantly turning her head to look at them. In fact, the subject is a near-obsession in her 38-minute, five-movement suite "Time, Identity and the Body." The title also serves for an evening of new dances that begins a three-night run tonight at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica.
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NEWS
August 26, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Time is of the essence for dancer-choreographer Elizabeth Hoefner. So much so that for one of her solos, she is festooned with nearly 100 wristwatches and constantly turning her head to look at them. In fact, the subject is a near-obsession in her 38-minute, five-movement suite "Time, Identity and the Body." The title also serves for an evening of new dances that begins a three-night run tonight at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2000 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dance has often been accused of lacking humor. Not so with Arianne MacBean and the Big Show Co., which shared billing with lwk-Bodytalk, two promising new troupes that appeared at Highways on Friday in an evening called "I'm Not You."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2002 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Explorations of identity under a clothesline, dance parodies that illuminate the performers' attitudes toward their work and one another: Choreographer Arianne MacBean is on her favorite turf with "This Happened," a new hourlong example of what she calls "smart dance," performed by her Big Show Company at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2003 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Just about every one of the seven choreographers in the fourth annual Dance Moving Forward Festival, produced by Arianne MacBean, presented strong work Thursday at the Electric Lodge in Venice. Geordie Wright's "Twice Removed" was an exhilarating response to the exultant Sinfonia from Bach's "Easter" Oratorio.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2004 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Unusual partnerships united the two halves of "Can You Move Me?," an exploratory evening of contemporary dance shared by locally based artists Stefan Fabry and Arianne MacBean at Highways Performance Space on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to the Times
From extreme yoga and power pirouetting to lush lyricism and bawdy Brazilian samba, Spectrum Dance in L.A. #17 once again proved that this town's dance scene sparkles with choreographic bling bling. Produced by Daisy Kim and Deborah Brockus and her Brockus Project Dance Company, Sunday night's slate of 16 choreographers mostly got down and a little dirty with old and new works.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2002 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From energetic kids learning to present themselves onstage to seasoned artists premiering high-concept vehicles, the 12th edition of Spectrum: Dance in L.A. offered every kind of dance except the stale, academic variety. In 16 pieces performed in 2 1/2 hours at the Ivar Theatre on Saturday, the latest installment in this quarterly showcase series managed to make even its unevenness a testament to the restless vitality of the local dance scene. You want body heat?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2001 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nesting Dolls is L.A.'s new dance company on the block, and this week it makes its second full evening appearance in town, at the Getty Center. But it's also a troupe with 10 years of experience. That's because Nesting Dolls and its director, dancer-choreographer Cid Pearlman, are, like so many Angelenos, transplants.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2002 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF
A writer confronts the blank page, a painter an empty canvas, but how does a dancer make a dance? Usually it starts with a body, the choreographer's own, and a mirror. As it evolves, it's utterly ephemeral--there's no sketch to show, no manuscript to pass around. Which is why L.A.'s Dance Resource Center has begun sponsoring Fieldwork, a set of carefully formulated workshops meant to create a nurturing but stringent environment in which performers can develop ideas.
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