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Elizabeth Kaye

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NEWS
June 5, 1995 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elizabeth Kaye was 35 years old when she learned a shocking truth: She didn't have long to live. The realization didn't come in the typical fashion. No stony-faced doctor informed her that she had terminal cancer. There wasn't a thing wrong with her, in fact. All at once it just dawned on Kaye that life is short and death is certain. The source of her epiphany was hitting the probable halfway point of her existence, that chronological apex known as middle age.
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MAGAZINE
November 21, 2004
Right after faulting us for making "gods of men," Elizabeth Kaye notches up the hero-worship herself by calling Kobe Bryant "an artist" ("Kobe's Second Act," Oct. 31). It made me wonder where the line is drawn--not between sports and art, which is too obvious to warrant explanation, but between simple, honest admiration of sports figures and the obsequious, ridiculous adulation that Kaye practices even as she condemns it. But it gets worse. She then asserts that "selfishness and arrogance are job qualifications for an artist" such as Bryant.
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NEWS
May 4, 1995 | KAREN STABINER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Elizabeth Kaye is halfway there: there being the place we're all headed and don't want to reach. Now somewhere around 50, her own mortality has been creeping up on her, and this book, this extended essay, is her effort to make sense of the inexorable. To say that she takes us through the stages of midlife would be to make this sound too much like Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, who categorized our feelings when confronted with death. Kaye works more in watercolors than file folders.
BOOKS
May 19, 2002 | BILL PLASCHKE, Bill Plaschke is a Times sports columnist. He is the author of "Hard Knox: The Life of an NFL Coach" with Chuck Knox and "No More Mr. Nice Guy: A Life of Hardball" with Dick Williams.
Watching the Los Angeles Lakers in the NBA playoffs this spring has been like watching that nutty couple from next door walking arm-in-arm down your street. There was a time when all you heard coming from their window was the sound of flying pots and flailing invectives. Now all you see is love. You want to applaud them, you want to embrace them, but, mostly, you want to ask them: So what happened?
NEWS
June 30, 1995
Re "Marking Time," June 5: I would imagine most baby boomers, like Elizabeth Kaye, are prone to experience the phenomenon of aging as a sudden, shocking catastrophe instead of a gradual metamorphosis. It was the baby boomers, really, who contributed the idea of glorifying youth to our culture. But, in order to worship youth, one must ignore such trivialities as mortality and wisdom. ARNO KEKS Los Angeles Elizabeth Kaye is obviously a profound thinker. At 35 she realized she was getting older and at some point will die. Cosmic.
NEWS
August 28, 1995 | JOAN KELLY BERNARD, NEWSDAY
OK, so I'm 46, as are many of my colleagues, give or take a few years, and the looming 50th birthday is a subject of consuming interest to us. We, the leading edge of the postwar Baby Boom--stuck with the label like an 80-year-old still called Sis or Babe--are now entrenched in middle age. As if on cue, we are being buried--excuse the allusion--in books about the transition from 40 to 50 to 60 and beyond.
MAGAZINE
November 21, 2004
Right after faulting us for making "gods of men," Elizabeth Kaye notches up the hero-worship herself by calling Kobe Bryant "an artist" ("Kobe's Second Act," Oct. 31). It made me wonder where the line is drawn--not between sports and art, which is too obvious to warrant explanation, but between simple, honest admiration of sports figures and the obsequious, ridiculous adulation that Kaye practices even as she condemns it. But it gets worse. She then asserts that "selfishness and arrogance are job qualifications for an artist" such as Bryant.
BOOKS
May 19, 2002 | BILL PLASCHKE, Bill Plaschke is a Times sports columnist. He is the author of "Hard Knox: The Life of an NFL Coach" with Chuck Knox and "No More Mr. Nice Guy: A Life of Hardball" with Dick Williams.
Watching the Los Angeles Lakers in the NBA playoffs this spring has been like watching that nutty couple from next door walking arm-in-arm down your street. There was a time when all you heard coming from their window was the sound of flying pots and flailing invectives. Now all you see is love. You want to applaud them, you want to embrace them, but, mostly, you want to ask them: So what happened?
MAGAZINE
November 28, 2004
As a high school English and journalism teacher, I have posted clippings of major stories from The Times around my classroom as both inspiration and decoration ("Kobe's Second Act," by Elizabeth Kaye, Oct. 31). As a Laker fan, I had a corner reserved for Kobe Bryant, one that became the favorite of many kids. Stapled up next to student essays and projects were pictures of Kobe soaring and shooting. The clippings are gone now, taken down a couple of months after his admission of an adulterous affair and allegations of worse.
NEWS
August 28, 1995 | JOAN KELLY BERNARD, NEWSDAY
OK, so I'm 46, as are many of my colleagues, give or take a few years, and the looming 50th birthday is a subject of consuming interest to us. We, the leading edge of the postwar Baby Boom--stuck with the label like an 80-year-old still called Sis or Babe--are now entrenched in middle age. As if on cue, we are being buried--excuse the allusion--in books about the transition from 40 to 50 to 60 and beyond.
NEWS
June 30, 1995
Re "Marking Time," June 5: I would imagine most baby boomers, like Elizabeth Kaye, are prone to experience the phenomenon of aging as a sudden, shocking catastrophe instead of a gradual metamorphosis. It was the baby boomers, really, who contributed the idea of glorifying youth to our culture. But, in order to worship youth, one must ignore such trivialities as mortality and wisdom. ARNO KEKS Los Angeles Elizabeth Kaye is obviously a profound thinker. At 35 she realized she was getting older and at some point will die. Cosmic.
NEWS
June 22, 1995 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elizabeth Kaye was 35 years old when she learned a shocking truth: She didn't have long to live. The realization didn't come in the typical fashion. No stony-faced doctor informed her that she had terminal cancer. There wasn't a thing wrong with her, in fact. All at once it just dawned on Kaye that life is short and death is certain. The source of her epiphany was hitting the probable halfway point of her existence, that chronological apex known as middle age.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | KAREN STABINER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Elizabeth Kaye is halfway there: there being the place we're all headed and don't want to reach. Now somewhere around 50, her own mortality has been creeping up on her, and this book, this extended essay, is her effort to make sense of the inexorable. To say that she takes us through the stages of midlife would be to make this sound too much like Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, who categorized our feelings when confronted with death. Kaye works more in watercolors than file folders.
SCIENCE
February 25, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Smokers are 70% more likely than nonsmokers to have root canals, researchers from the Boston University's Goldman School of Dental Medicine reported Thursday at an American Medical Assn. briefing. Epidemiologist Elizabeth Krall Kaye and her colleagues studied 811 men who had not initially received a root canal for 30 years, identifying 998 teeth that ultimately required the procedure. Cigar and pipe smoking did not increase the risk. Stopping smoking for nine years returned the risk to normal.
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