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Elizabeth Keck

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1988 | EDWIN CHEN
The butler didn't do it. With that Los Angeles County Superior Court jury verdict, Rune Gunnar Donell was exonerated Friday on criminal charges of stealing a valuable oil painting from the Bel-Air chateau of his longtime employers, Howard and Elizabeth Keck. Elizabeth Keck, now estranged from her husband, had alleged that Donell stole the painting and sold it in his native Sweden for $500,000.
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BUSINESS
June 4, 1990 | From United Press International
Keck Divorce Case Request Fails: A Los Angeles Superior Court judge refused to grant a preliminary order disqualifying a Los Angeles law firm, Trope & Trope, from representing Elizabeth Avery Keck in her divorce proceeding against Howard B. Keck Sr., whose father founded Superior Oil Co. The order was sought in a legal malpractice suit filed by the couple's son, oil heir Howard B. Keck Jr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1988 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Rune Gunnar Donell, the butler acquitted of charges that he stole a valuable artwork from his employer's Bel-Air mansion, is not yet out of the woods. His accuser and one-time employer, Elizabeth Keck, filed a $31-million civil lawsuit against him Monday in Los Angeles County Superior Court for theft, slander, invasion of privacy and infliction of emotional distress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Libby Keck was distraught as she stood in the conservatory of her $42-million, treasure-filled Bel-Air mansion. "Look at that!" she shrieked. "Yes, ma'am," her bodyguard and chauffeur, Roger Paine, replied hesitantly. Sensing his uncertainty, Keck led him by the hand to a painting and ran his fingers across its surface. It was as smooth as glass. Paine knew right away that it was no Impressionistic oil painting but a high-quality color photograph. "Well, hell!
BUSINESS
June 4, 1990 | From United Press International
Keck Divorce Case Request Fails: A Los Angeles Superior Court judge refused to grant a preliminary order disqualifying a Los Angeles law firm, Trope & Trope, from representing Elizabeth Avery Keck in her divorce proceeding against Howard B. Keck Sr., whose father founded Superior Oil Co. The order was sought in a legal malpractice suit filed by the couple's son, oil heir Howard B. Keck Jr.
SPORTS
May 15, 1986 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
There is in horse racing today only one breeder with a chance to win the 1986 Triple Crown. He is Howard B. Keck of Los Angeles, a retired oilman whose hobby for the last half-century has been creating things that go fast. Animate things or inanimate, four-legged, or four-wheeled, it doesn't much matter. His bag is the engineering. Three years ago, Keck created the horse that won the Kentucky Derby earlier this month under a 54-year-old rider, Bill Shoemaker.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Libby Keck was distraught as she stood in the conservatory of her $42-million, treasure-filled Bel-Air mansion. "Look at that!" she shrieked. "Yes, ma'am," her bodyguard and chauffeur, Roger Paine, replied hesitantly. Sensing his uncertainty, Keck led him by the hand to a painting and ran his fingers across its surface. It was as smooth as glass. Paine knew right away that it was no Impressionistic oil painting but a high-quality color photograph. "Well, hell!
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1988
As a longtime admirer of Judy Stabile's work, I was appalled that she was not mentioned in Calendar's article on Hal's restaurant. There are only four artists hanging at Hal's. Halliburton mentioned three of them by name, referring to them as the "local big boys," and completely ignored Stabile's work. Since Stabile's work is not just represented at Hal's, (true, it's hip), but in the private collections of such prominent collectors as Marcia Weissman, Elizabeth Keck, Dan Melnick, etc. (even more hip)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1987 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
When Elizabeth Keck strolled through the card room of her luxurious Bel-Air mansion recently, she noticed something dramatically amiss with a 19th-Century European painting hanging in the corner. The oil, "I Fria Luften," had been removed from its frame and replaced with a high-quality photograph of the original canvas she had purchased for more than $80,000 in 1982, Keck told police last month.
NEWS
December 18, 1986
Retired oilman Howard B. Keck and his two daughters filed suit against his sons and 19 other family members in an attempt to establish Keck's adopted daughter as a legitimate heir to his multimillion-dollar estate. In a petition filed in Los Angeles Superior Court, the 72-year-old retired chairman of Superior Oil Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1988 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Rune Gunnar Donell, the butler acquitted of charges that he stole a valuable artwork from his employer's Bel-Air mansion, is not yet out of the woods. His accuser and one-time employer, Elizabeth Keck, filed a $31-million civil lawsuit against him Monday in Los Angeles County Superior Court for theft, slander, invasion of privacy and infliction of emotional distress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1988 | EDWIN CHEN
The butler didn't do it. With that Los Angeles County Superior Court jury verdict, Rune Gunnar Donell was exonerated Friday on criminal charges of stealing a valuable oil painting from the Bel-Air chateau of his longtime employers, Howard and Elizabeth Keck. Elizabeth Keck, now estranged from her husband, had alleged that Donell stole the painting and sold it in his native Sweden for $500,000.
SPORTS
May 15, 1986 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
There is in horse racing today only one breeder with a chance to win the 1986 Triple Crown. He is Howard B. Keck of Los Angeles, a retired oilman whose hobby for the last half-century has been creating things that go fast. Animate things or inanimate, four-legged, or four-wheeled, it doesn't much matter. His bag is the engineering. Three years ago, Keck created the horse that won the Kentucky Derby earlier this month under a 54-year-old rider, Bill Shoemaker.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
Libby Keck was distraught as she stood in the conservatory of her $42-million, treasure-filled Bel-Air mansion. "Look at that!" she shrieked. "Yes, ma'am," her bodyguard and chauffeur, Roger Paine, replied hesitantly. Sensing his uncertainty, Keck led him by the hand to a painting and ran his fingers across its surface. It was as smooth as glass. Paine knew right away that it was no Impressionistic oil painting but a high-quality color photograph. "Well, hell!
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