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Elizabeth Marek

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1989 | HOWARD BLUME, Times Staff Writer
Elizabeth Marek's presence on doomed Pan Am Flight 103, which exploded Dec. 21 over Scotland, had nothing to do with her political activism. The 30-year-old Venice actress and singer, who was returning home from a vacation, never intended to become a martyr for the peace movement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1989 | HOWARD BLUME, Times Staff Writer
Elizabeth Marek's presence on doomed Pan Am Flight 103, which exploded Dec. 21 over Scotland, had nothing to do with her political activism. The 30-year-old Venice actress and singer, who was returning home from a vacation, never intended to become a martyr for the peace movement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1988
I knew Elizabeth Marek ("Young Southlanders in Fiery Death," Part I, Dec. 24). For 8 1/2 months back in 1986, we walked together across the continent--from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C.--as part of the Great Peace March for Global Nuclear Disarmament. She was an outgoing person, friendly and benign. She had much to live for, and even more to give. There is always irony in death. The sad paradox of Elizabeth's tragic end is that she perished from the very thing that she had protested: violence.
SPORTS
April 24, 1997 | DANA HADDAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frank Brennan has seen just about everything in his 18 seasons as women's tennis coach at Stanford. But he's never had a player quite like Ania Bleszynski and at times that troubles him. She came to Stanford from Thousand Oaks three years ago as the No. 1 player in the United States in 18-and-under singles, and today she will return to play in the Pacific 10 Conference Championships in the Ojai Valley Tournament.
NEWS
December 24, 1988 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
They probably had never met each other, the five young people from Southern California who would die together in a fiery crash over Scotland on Pan Am's Flight 103. They were all young, too young. The oldest was just 35. But they had something else in common, something their friends and family members would remark upon in their grief. Remarkably, it seemed, each of the five had reached a semi-magical point in life when a brass ring each had worked and sacrificed for was within grasp.
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