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Elizabeth Neilson Armstrong

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May 9, 2001 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Elizabeth Neilson Armstrong peered down Marcel Duchamp's 1917 presentation of a urinal as art, titled, "Fountain," she had no idea the Dada philosophy would have such an influence on her career. The work was meant to knock art off its pedestal, to connect it to daily life. That theory was radical in the early 1900s and remains inspirational to Armstrong today. Armstrong, who recently was named chief curator at the Orange County Museum of Art, thrives on transition.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2001 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Elizabeth Neilson Armstrong peered down Marcel Duchamp's 1917 presentation of a urinal as art, titled, "Fountain," she had no idea the Dada philosophy would have such an influence on her career. The work was meant to knock art off its pedestal, to connect it to daily life. That theory was radical in the early 1900s and remains inspirational to Armstrong today. Armstrong, who recently was named chief curator at the Orange County Museum of Art, thrives on transition.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2001 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Museum of Art brought to a close Wednesday a long, arduous search to replace its chief curator and announced that it has filled two other positions. Beleaguered by a string of top rank departures within the last year, the museum is now poised for a $60-million expansion; it has plans to move to a larger location. Elizabeth Neilson Armstrong, takes the new chief curator position in April. She has served as senior curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art in La Jolla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2001 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Museum of Art brought to a close Wednesday a long, arduous search to replace its chief curator and announced that it has filled two other positions. Beleaguered by a string of top rank departures within the last year, the museum is now poised for a $60-million expansion; it has plans to move to a larger location. Elizabeth Neilson Armstrong, takes the new chief curator position in April. She has served as senior curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art in La Jolla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2001
Beginning this week, we expand our state, regional and local news coverage in a newly designed California section. Among the changes on Wednesdays: A new weekly feature, "In the Classroom"--on schools and education--debuts on B2. Daily lottery numbers appear on B3. Information on how to reach us is on B3. A new color weather map appears daily on the back page of the section. Local arts and entertainment stories, previously in this section, have moved.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2001 | LEE MARGULIES
TELEVISION 'Dr. Laura' Takes a Holiday: "Dr. Laura" will temporarily cease production this week, but the program's distributor, Paramount, insists the series has not been canceled. The talk show hosted by controversial radio personality Laura Schlessinger will resume production in March after its hiatus, the studio said. With the show relegated to the wee morning hours in many major cities, the expectation has been that "Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2002 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deputy director of art and chief curator Elizabeth Neilson Armstrong knew when she started last April at the Orange County Museum of Art that it was in a transitional stage with a recently redefined mission and an ongoing search for a new location. She just didn't realize she would be temporarily in charge of monitoring all the changes. But the death of the museum's founding director, Naomi Vine, in December meant that Armstrong had to step in as acting director.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2001 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Museum of Art, formerly the Newport Harbor Art Museum, has weathered three crises: the abandonment of expansion plans due to recession in the early '90s, a controversial merger with the Laguna Art Museum in 1996 and 18 months without a curator since September 1999. Those challenges have led the institution to refine and redefine itself.
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