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Elizabeth Norment

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June 25, 1991 | PAT H. BROESKE
Last summer, in what she describes as "an exhilarating and exhausting experience," Elizabeth Norment played two of Shakespeare's best-known female characters--the inventive Rosalind and the witty Beatrice--in productions, respectively, of "As You Like It" and "Much Ado About Nothing" at the Grove Shakespeare Festival.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1991 | PAT H. BROESKE
Last summer, in what she describes as "an exhilarating and exhausting experience," Elizabeth Norment played two of Shakespeare's best-known female characters--the inventive Rosalind and the witty Beatrice--in productions, respectively, of "As You Like It" and "Much Ado About Nothing" at the Grove Shakespeare Festival.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1990 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elizabeth Norment doesn't believe in "the sappy view that love conquers all," which the happy endings of Shakespeare's great domestic comedies would appear to suggest. Yet for the past month--as Beatrice in the Grove Shakespeare Festival's "Much Ado About Nothing"--the actress has been persuading audiences that love can overwhelm one of the Bard's most skeptical, anti-romantic women.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1990 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elizabeth Norment doesn't believe in "the sappy view that love conquers all," which the happy endings of Shakespeare's great domestic comedies would appear to suggest. Yet for the past month--as Beatrice in the Grove Shakespeare Festival's "Much Ado About Nothing"--the actress has been persuading audiences that love can overwhelm one of the Bard's most skeptical, anti-romantic women.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1993
Faces familiar to devotees of Orange County's classical theater scene will feature prominently in Shakespeare Orange County's second season. "Much Ado About Nothing," to be directed by Carl Reggiardo, will run July 9 to Aug. 7 at Chapman University's Waltmar Theatre. The principal roles will all be filled by returnees from last season, it was announced Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1991 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thomas F. Bradac, recently ousted as the artistic director of the Grove Shakespeare Festival, has formed a new professional theater troupe called Shakespeare/Orange County to operate on the campus of Chapman University in Orange. Bradac announced Tuesday that the company, which is to work under a Small Professional Theatre contract still in negotiation with Actors' Equity, will open its maiden seven-week season next summer with "The Winter's Tale" (July 10 to Aug. 2) and "Hamlet" (Aug.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES ORANGE COUNTY THEARTER CRITIC
Shakespeare by starlight means the summer theater season is upon us. With "Much Ado About Nothing" launching the Grove Shakespeare Festival's outdoor series at the Festival Amphitheatre, playgoers have much to celebrate: an updated staging that is not only lovely to look at but witty and imaginative in concept and beautifully executed by a first-class cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1997 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Behind an unprepossessing storefront in the Plaza Pasadena mall, near the food court, a first-rate theatrical company is evolving. Pasadena Shakespeare Company's great promise is on ample display in its bang-up, thoroughly entertaining production of "Our Country's Good," Timberlake Wertenbaker's somewhat attenuated drama about the first group of British convicts sent to Australia. Capt.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1996 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Laguna Playhouse has slated a new play, "The Labors of Hercules" by David Drummond, as part of its current subscription season. The play, described by the Laguna Beach theater as "a satire about a controversial art project in a small town," will run March 12-April 7. "Labors" will be the second new play to premiere at the playhouse in recent years. The first was "Teachers' Lounge," a comedy by John Twomey, staged in 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Something definitely was on the mind of director Libby Appel when she staged Philip Barry's 1939 "The Philadelphia Story," which opened over the weekend at South Coast Repertory. You can guess what it is when you enter the theater and see the opulence on stage. It is what Barry called "the arrogance of class."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
There is a stealthy design to Donald Margulies' "Sight Unseen," a rich and personal new play that opened Saturday on the Second Stage at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. It has the earmarks of a jigsaw puzzle. It leaps back and forth through time, with characters who say one thing to mean another, and has meaningful looks and pregnant, if-not-quite-Pinteresque pauses. And it knows how to bide its time.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The programs, posters and press releases for Thomas F. Bradac's staging of "Hamlet" for Shakespeare Orange County retain the often dropped "Prince of Denmark" as the last three words of the title. With good reason: Wayne Alexander's Hamlet is every inch a prince. And the designers place us squarely in deepest, darkest Denmark. Alexander speaks, moves, sighs and fights with regal grace.
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