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Elizabeth Sisco

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November 16, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, saying he needed time to "reflect" on the controversy created by his cancellation of a grant for an AIDS art show here, implied Wednesday that the federal arts agency may reconsider its position. But John E. Frohnmayer declined to say whether the process of reflection might lead to restoration of part or all of a $10,000 grant approved last July for the show, which includes work by 23 artists.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1990 | JAN BRESLAUER
With the National Endowment for the Arts under siege over funding policy and much of the arts community trying to put its least controversial foot forward, you might think that four dissident artists who love to ruffle the status quo would be less public with their provocations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1990 | JAN BRESLAUER
With the National Endowment for the Arts under siege over funding policy and much of the arts community trying to put its least controversial foot forward, you might think that four dissident artists who love to ruffle the status quo would be less public with their provocations.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, saying he needed time to "reflect" on the controversy created by his cancellation of a grant for an AIDS art show here, implied Wednesday that the federal arts agency may reconsider its position. But John E. Frohnmayer declined to say whether the process of reflection might lead to restoration of part or all of a $10,000 grant approved last July for the show, which includes work by 23 artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1989
San Diego County artists David Avalos, Louis Hock and Elizabeth Sisco will discuss the "New Acquisitions" exhibit at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art at 6:30 p.m. today during an informal walk-through of the show. Pieces by Sisco, Hock and Avalos, who are known for their socially relevant artworks, are part of the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI
A group of San Diego artists has scheduled a public forum--paid for under a National Endowment for the Arts grant issued to support a public education campaign dealing with censorship issues--for Sunday titled "Art: Framed, Censorship and the NEA, 1989." It will last from noon to 3 p.m. and be at the Installation Gallery, 930 E St., San Diego.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1991
Congratulations, San Diego Police Chief Bob Burgreen; congratulations, San Diego artists Deborah Small, Elizabeth Sisco, Scott Kessler and Louis Hock; congratulations to the National Endowment for the Arts. With a bit of awareness made public by concerned artists in the form of bus bench posters placed at various places in the city, funded partly by the NEA, a sad situation has been addressed by and hopefully corrected by the San Diego police chief and the department as a whole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1988
"Welcome to America's Finest Tourist Plantation," the work of artists Elizabeth Sisco, Louis Hock and David Avalos, speaks a very real truth about San Diego--the crucial role of the undocumented worker in the local tourist industry. While this may not have been the truth that the Convention and Visitors Bureau officials would have desired (perhaps a picture of bubbly tourists on the beach?), it certainly is not a "totally false representation of San Diego and the tourist industry," as claimed by ConVis spokesman Al Reese.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1990
Artists Louis Hock, Elizabeth Sisco, Scott Kessler, Deborah Small, et al., should be commended for their work ("Bus Bench Art Within NEA Guidelines," Nov. 3). These artists were granted National Endowment for the Arts money "to extend our exploration of the way art can illuminate contradictions and act as a catalyst for local debate." Their work is right on target. Indeed, these ads have "illuminated contradictions" by bringing renewed interest into the questionable activities of the San Diego Police Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of local artists have spent federal grant money to rent 25 bus benches for ads that criticize the use of deadly force by the San Diego Police Department, triggering controversy and leaving the police chief and many others furious. The art on the benches features the outline of seven human bodies silhouetted in black against a blood-red background. Within each human figure is a target, similar to those at police shooting ranges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1993
The notion is outrageous: using tax money for a public art performance that consists of handing out signed $10 bills to immigrant workers as a "celebration" of their economic contributions to the country. But this is precisely what David Avalos, Louis Hock and Elizabeth Sisco did, not far from the place in San Diego County where three years ago a young migrant was tied up and made to wear a sign reading, in broken Spanish, "get out of here."
NEWS
September 4, 1993 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts on Friday mildly scolded a San Diego museum for allowing three artists to hand out $4,500 of federal grant money in $10 bills to illegal immigrants. In a decision made by acting NEA Chairman Ana Steele, the agency announced that handing out the $10 bills was an "unallowable expense" and did not fit the terms of NEA's grant to San Diego's Museum of Contemporary Art, which was to cover "materials, supplies and honoraria."
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