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Elizabeth Taheri

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2001 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her two seasons with Shakespeare Orange County, Elizabeth Taheri has woven her way through some of the Bard's most memorable female roles. She also has gotten some serious knitting done. Last summer she debuted as Kate in "The Taming of the Shrew." It was an innovative, surprising and, as Times reviewer T.H. McCulloh put it, "delicious" turn. She followed Kate with a wide-eyed Miranda in "The Tempest."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2001 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"As You Like It" may be a trifle when weighed against much in Shakespeare's library, but it's a trifle with one of his most engaging comic heroines. That would be Rosalind, the amorous character nobody ever seems to mind spending a couple of hours with in the theater. Shakespeare Orange County has an appealing one in Elizabeth Taheri, who steadies an uneven staging with a mix of glee and guile. Everything starts slowly in this tale of the smitten lady and her swooning target, Orlando.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2001
8pm Theater In his comedy "As You Like It," Shakespeare brings a cast of lovers and backstabbing usurpers to the forest of Arden, a pastoral wonderland where romance can bloom and wrongs can be redressed. Elizabeth Taheri has the lead as Rosalind.* "As You Like It," presented by Shakespeare Orange County at the Waltmar Theatre, Chapman University, 301 E. Palm St., Orange. Preview tonight; opens Friday. Thursdays through Saturdays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 3 p.m. Ends Aug. 11. $25. (714) 744-7016
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2001
8pm Theater In his comedy "As You Like It," Shakespeare brings a cast of lovers and backstabbing usurpers to the forest of Arden, a pastoral wonderland where romance can bloom and wrongs can be redressed. Elizabeth Taheri has the lead as Rosalind.* "As You Like It," presented by Shakespeare Orange County at the Waltmar Theatre, Chapman University, 301 E. Palm St., Orange. Preview tonight; opens Friday. Thursdays through Saturdays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 3 p.m. Ends Aug. 11. $25. (714) 744-7016
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2001 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"As You Like It" may be a trifle when weighed against much in Shakespeare's library, but it's a trifle with one of his most engaging comic heroines. That would be Rosalind, the amorous character nobody ever seems to mind spending a couple of hours with in the theater. Shakespeare Orange County has an appealing one in Elizabeth Taheri, who steadies an uneven staging with a mix of glee and guile. Everything starts slowly in this tale of the smitten lady and her swooning target, Orlando.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
The man definitely is from Mars. The woman is not merely from Venus -- she is Venus. We're talking about "Venus and Adonis," Shakespeare's poem, presented in a fully staged version by Shakespeare Orange County at Chapman University's Waltmar Theatre in Orange. Shakespeare didn't write it to be staged. But that hasn't stopped director Thomas F. Bradac, who presented Benjamin Stewart's solo version of the poem twice before, including one in this same theater in 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2000 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some directors faced with the sensual opportunities of "The Tempest" just can't resist drowning in them. They pack Prospero's magical isle with one vivid image after another, often dimming Shakespeare's language and overwhelming the brilliance of his characters. Not so with Shakespeare Orange County's staging at Chapman University in Orange. Thomas F.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Orange County is inadvertently playing host to a little "Othello" festival this summer, with two productions of Shakespeare's tragedy. In both, the soldiers wear modern fatigues. Shakespeare Orange County's vibrant "Othello" opened in Orange on the same weekend that the Grove Theater Center's closed in Garden Grove. Comparisons are inevitable. And Thomas F. Bradac's staging for Shakespeare Orange County, in the Waltmar Theatre on the campus of Chapman University, gets the nod.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1993 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Now that the season is upon us, we are being inundated with Christmases of all sorts, from Dickensian to Capotesque. How welcome, in the midst of them all, is the fresh breath of tingly, pine-scented air that comes with the California Repertory Company's holiday production--Howard Burman's adaptation of the stories that make up "An O. Henry Christmas." During the depression of 1893, some poor souls have gathered round a fire beneath a bridge in Manhattan.
NEWS
December 9, 1993 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Now that the season is upon us, we are inundated with Christmases of all sorts. How welcome, in the midst of them all, is the fresh breath of tingly, pine-scented air that comes with the California Repertory Company's holiday production--Howard Burman's adaptation of the stories that make up "An O. Henry Christmas." During the depression of 1893, some poor souls have gathered round a fire beneath a bridge in Manhattan. They are recognizable refugees from a few O.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2001 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her two seasons with Shakespeare Orange County, Elizabeth Taheri has woven her way through some of the Bard's most memorable female roles. She also has gotten some serious knitting done. Last summer she debuted as Kate in "The Taming of the Shrew." It was an innovative, surprising and, as Times reviewer T.H. McCulloh put it, "delicious" turn. She followed Kate with a wide-eyed Miranda in "The Tempest."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2000 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Next to Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice," which often prompts outcries of anti-Semitism, the Bard's "The Taming of the Shrew" runs second in subverting some current ideologies. The shrew's apparent surrender to male dictates causes feminists to shake tight fists at the heavens and shriek through clenched teeth. Director John Frederick Jones, in his staging for Shakespeare Orange County, might have hit on the key to halfway solve that problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2001 | BY MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the founding force behind a storefront theater company decides it is time to get a life, it can be the death of the troupe itself. That was the fate of Alternative Repertory Theatre in Santa Ana last year when its two founders called it quits. There was no one able or willing to carry on, and ART was kaput.
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