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Elizabeth Warren

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BUSINESS
August 1, 2010
Born: June 22, 1949, Oklahoma City. Education: Bachelor's degree, University of Houston, 1970; law degree, Rutgers School of Law, 1976. Career: Law professor, Harvard, 1995-present; law professor, University of Pennsylvania, 1987-95; law professor, fellow and research associate, University of Texas, 1983-87; associate law professor and associate dean for academic affairs, University of Houston, 1978-83. Government work: Chairwoman, Congressional Oversight Panel for the Troubled Asset Relief Program, 2008-present; chief advisor to the National Bankruptcy Review Commission, 1995-97.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By David Lauter, Los Angeles Times
Elizabeth Warren's ninth book is a campaign biography with a twist. Warren, who emerged as a national figure during the early days of the financial crisis, rapidly became a star of the Democratic Party's liberal-populist wing. Her 2012 Senate campaign in Massachusetts attracted so much money and attention that admirers began talking her up as a presidential candidate even before she won. "A Fighting Chance" could easily fit as the next step toward that goal. It weaves her life story and political manifesto in the classic manner of books designed to accompany a run for office.
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NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Consumer advocate Elizabeth Warren is off to a quick start when it comes to raising money for her Senate campaign in Massachusetts, with a debut total -- $3.15 million -- that may even out-perform some of the Republican candidates for president. Warren, who helped set up the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and is a favorite candidate among progressives, announced the impressive third-quarter haul in an email to her supporters Monday. She said that 96% of the contributions came in donations of $100 or less.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Scott Brown finally took the plunge. And this time he kept his shirt on. The former senator from Massachusetts, after keeping politicos in Washington and his newly adopted home state of New Hampshire guessing for months, announced Friday that he had formed an exploratory committee to run for U.S. Senate in the Granite State this year. The step -- he called it the start of a "Main Streets & Living Rooms Tour" -- is short of a full commitment to run for the seat held by first-term Democrat Jeanne Shaheen.
NEWS
September 13, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
After a brief flirtation with the race, consumer advocate Elizabeth Warren plans to officially become a candidate for Senate in Massachusetts on Wednesday, giving Democrats a candidate with national stature in the rare contest where they are on offense in 2012. Warren oversaw the launch of the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau before leaving the Obama administration this summer. She formed an exploratory committee for the race shortly after. "The pressures on middle-class families are worse than ever, but it is the big corporations that get their way in Washington.
OPINION
May 27, 2012 | By Charlotte Allen
The contretemps over whether Elizabeth Warren is really an American Indian has gone from the ridiculous to the ridiculous. Warren is the blond, blue-eyed, ultra-liberal Harvard law professor running for Republican Sen. Scott Brown's seat in Massachusetts. Despite a complete lack of evidence outside of "family lore" and "high cheekbones," she listed herself as a "minority" professor in a law faculty directory for some years. Documentation showing Warren to be 1/32 Cherokee - that is, having a Cherokee great-great-great-grandfather - turned out not to exist.
NEWS
August 18, 2011 | By Michael Muskal
Elizabeth Warren, the darling of progressives, on Thursday moved a step closer to running against Sen. Scott Brown by forming an exploratory committee and launching a website for her likely race in Massachusetts. A consumer advocate and Harvard law professor, she has been signaling for weeks that she is preparing to run against Brown in what will become a closely watched Senate race in 2012. Amid the frenzy over President Obama's healthcare overhaul, Brown, with the backing of the “tea party” movement, captured the Senate seat held by the late liberal icon, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown, whose upset victory in early 2010 marked the moment when many started to take the tea party movement seriously, leads his likely 2012 Democratic challenger Elizabeth Warren by 9 percentage points, according to a new survey of voters. Brown has 49% support compared with Warren's 40%, according to a Suffolk University poll released Thursday. Warren, whose reputation as a consumer advocate has made her the darling of progressive activists, holds a commanding lead over her Democratic challengers for the party's nomination, which will be decided in the primary election Sept.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Talk about karma. After lobbying ferociously to prevent Elizabeth Warren from running the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the banking industry now must contend with her sitting on the Senate Banking Committee. Rumors have circulated for weeks the Massachusetts senator-elect would be tapped for the gig overseeing the industry she so completely cheesed off with accusations of fraud and unfair play. Now it's official . You can almost hear the muttering among bankers about the tough-love they're going to face.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Elizabeth Warren, the Harvard law professor who has organized the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, will step down as advisor to the Obama administration Monday and be replaced as de facto acting director by a top aide, the Treasury Department announced. Raj Date, who serves as the agency's associate director of research, markets and regulations, will become a special advisor to Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner and run the bureau's daily operations until a director is confirmed.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Michael McGough
Sen. Elizabeth Warren's populist crusade has a new objective: preventing “a corporate capture of the federal courts.” The Massachusetts Democrat and progressive heroine graciously concedes that “there are some really talented judges who came from the private sector.” But she insists that “it matters that someone has represented people other than corporate clients, that they've had real experience with people who can't afford lawyers, that...
BUSINESS
January 10, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
The dirty little secret of those eye-popping fines and penalties the government has been extracting from banks and Wall Street firms for financial wrongdoing is that they cost the firms only a fraction of the top-line numbers. Now Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) are demanding that the top and bottom lines be disclosed -- not only what the government and the banks claim the settlements are worth, but what they're really worth. As my colleague Jim Puzzanghera reported , they've introduced the Truth in Settlements Act to do that job.  For any federal agency settlement larger than $1 million -- and you have to be engaged in some pretty trivial wrongdoing to fall below that threshold -- the act would require public disclosure of how much of the settlement is tax-deductible, and how much involves "credits" for routine conduct.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Tom Coburn on Wednesday introduced legislation requiring federal agencies to disclose more information about settlements that end government investigations, such as whether the money paid by companies is tax-deductible. The bipartisan bill -- Warren is a Massachusetts Democrat and Coburn an Oklahoma Republican -- reflects widespread concern on Capitol Hill that banks such as JPMorgan Chase & Co. and other companies often cut deals to avoid potentially steeper penalties and court costs for violating federal laws.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Four new U.S. senators have taken the oath of office since the start of the 113th Congress but only one, Cory Booker, New Jersey's new junior senator, has attracted much attention. Vice President Joe Biden administered the oath to the former Newark mayor on Thursday, drawing robust applause from the unusually packed galleries of the Senate chamber. More than two dozen fellow Democrats were on hand to welcome Booker to their ranks, along with only three Republicans, including South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott, the only other African American in the Senate.
OPINION
October 30, 2013 | By Ciara Torres-Spelliscy
Anticipating the Securities and Exchange Commission's actions can feel like waiting for Godot. The SEC has been sitting on a petition for a new rule requiring publicly traded companies to disclose to shareholders what corporate funds are spent on political activities. The petition was filed in August 2011 by 10 corporate law professors, yet the formal rule-making process on it still has not begun. More than 640,000 people - including senators, representatives, state treasurers, comptrollers, former Vanguard Chief Executive John Bogle, investors and me - have filed public comments endorsing the need for such a rule.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) urged labor leaders Sunday to prepare for an uphill battle as they seek to strengthen the labor movement, beat back "powerful interests" and enact financial reform.   Warren made a speech at the quadrennial convention of the AFL-CIO, which kicked off Sunday in Los Angeles. The labor federation's convention has brought together traditional union groups with new, progressive allies such as the Sierra Club and the NAACP.  Warren, the freshman senator and newest member  of the Senate Banking Committee, voiced her support for the labor movement, which has seen its political power wane in recent years as union membership has dropped.  Photos: Jobs with the longest and shortest workdays "In every fight to build opportunity in this country ... in every fight for working families, we have been on the front lines because our agenda is America's agenda," Warren said.  "But let's be clear, we have always had to run uphill," she said.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - The godmother of President Obama's “you didn't build that” gaffe on Wednesday tried to rehabilitate the populist argument for the role of government. Elizabeth Warren, challenging Republican Scott Brown for a U.S. Senate seat in Massachusetts, argued at the Democratic National Convention that government fosters private-sector success and promised Obama would invest in infrastructure, education and healthcare for the vulnerable. “That's how we build the economy of the future.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Michael McGough
Elizabeth Warren, the consumer advocate and Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate in Massachusetts, has now acknowledged that she told her employers at Harvard and the University of Pennsylvania about her “Native American heritage.”  But she insisted in a statement released Wednesday night that those who hired her to teach at the Harvard and University of Pennsylvania law schools  “have said unequivocally they were not aware of my heritage...
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - A plan to restore lower interest rates on most college loans won Senate approval Wednesday, despite objections from a bloc of Democrats who warned it could ultimately increase the cost of a degree for many students. The legislation, which is supported by President Obama and is expected to swiftly pass the House, would reinstate a market-based approach for calculating rates, tying them to the 10-year Treasury note. The new rate for undergraduate Stafford loans would be about 3.8% this year, slightly above the rate that expired July 1. The final vote was 81-18.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Elizabeth Warren has launched a campaign to make banks boring again as she pushes legislation to enact stricter regulations forcing deposit-taking financial institutions out of the investment business. The Massachusetts Democrat wants to reinstate the Depression-era Glass-Steagall law, which separated what she called boring checking and savings accounts that are backed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. from risky investment banking. And after joining three other senators Thursday in introducing a bill to do that, Warren went to the Twitterverse to rally support.
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