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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2009 | David Ng
Shakespeare's Globe, the renowned London theater company, is returning to the United States this fall in a tour that will make two November stops in Southern California -- at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica (Nov. 19-29) and at UC Santa Barbara (Nov. 13-15). The company will perform Shakespeare's "Love's Labour's Lost" using a traditional Elizabethan staging that involves elaborate costumes and a mostly bare stage. -- David Ng
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Shakespeare and contemporary popular music might seem like strange bedfellows, but his plays have a way of coalescing with whatever musical style is thrown their way. A rock version of "Two Gentlemen of Verona" won the Tony for best musical in 1972, proving that not even the zaniest combination is off the table. A curious experiment is underway at the Old Globe Theatre pairing Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" with the moody songs of singer-songwriter Jeff Buckley, who died in a drowning accident in 1997 at age 30 but managed to leave a rich musical legacy that has spoken across generations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1998
I wish to clarify the statement in Kenneth Turan's review of "Shakespeare in Love" that Marc Norman "came up with the deft original idea of having Shakespeare's play and life influence each other" ("A Welcome Winter's Tale," Dec. 11). This is not to disparage the contributions of Norman and co-writer Tom Stoppard, but the idea has been around a good while. Faye Kellerman, a famed local mystery author, dramatized Shakespeare's love life in her 1989 novel, "The Quality of Mercy--A Novel of Intrigue in Elizabethan England."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2011 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
Ron Patterson, who with his then-wife Phyllis founded the Renaissance Pleasure Faire in 1963, which showcased traditions of 16th century Elizabethan England, has died. He was 80. Patterson died Jan. 15 in Sausalito, Calif., where he was receiving hospice care at the home of a friend, said his son Kevin. He had been in declining health for several years. For the first festival, which was held in North Hollywood, the couple enlisted fellow improvisational actors, craftsmen and others who dressed in their best approximation of Elizabethan-era costumes and intermingled with visitors.
BOOKS
August 9, 1992
In correcting Jay McInerney and Richard Eder, Andrew Dungan (Letters, July 12), is quite certain that "Brightness Falls" from the hair, not from the air. He is certainly right that we read the usual version of the line, "Brightness falls from the air," in a modern, symbolist way that would have made little sense to Elizabethan readers. And I too was completely convinced by J.V. Cunningham's argument. But as it happens, his proof was not quite conclusive. Wesley Trimpi has published a long, detailed paper in which he shows that the line Nashe wrote is probably "Brightness falls from the air" and that it made perfectly good sense to Elizabethans in terms of contemporary theories of disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Shakespeare and contemporary popular music might seem like strange bedfellows, but his plays have a way of coalescing with whatever musical style is thrown their way. A rock version of "Two Gentlemen of Verona" won the Tony for best musical in 1972, proving that not even the zaniest combination is off the table. A curious experiment is underway at the Old Globe Theatre pairing Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" with the moody songs of singer-songwriter Jeff Buckley, who died in a drowning accident in 1997 at age 30 but managed to leave a rich musical legacy that has spoken across generations.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | SUE MARTIN
Ah, 'tis spring and all the land is faire . . . at the Renaissance Pleasure Faire at ye olde Paramount Ranch in the gently dimpled hills of Agoura. Rain postponed the opening of the Faire last weekend, but everything is in place today for the usual pageantry and play. This year (the Faire's 26th), the 400th anniversary of Sir Francis Drake's defeat of the Spanish Armada, is being celebrated every weekend through June 5. Fairegoers can see the great navigator himself or listen to his compatriots spin yarns along Freebooter's Way. Or perhaps pay their respects to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth I when she makes her daily progress through the village at 3 p.m. From downtown Los Angeles, take U.S. 101 north to the Chesebro exit, then follow the signs to the Faire's imaginary English village of Chipping-under-Oakwood.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1992
In Peter Rainer's review of Derek Jarman's marvelous film version of Christopher Marlowe's play, "Edward II" ("An Audacious Slant on 'Edward II,' " April 10), there is a fascinating mistake that leads one to a quite startling conclusion. Marlowe was murdered May 30, 1593, but, according to Rainer, the Elizabethan spy and playwright's dramatic version of the 14th-Century homosexual King of England was written the very next year, leaving only one assumption: Someone else wrote the works of Marlowe!
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2007
THANK you for your much-deserved attention to classically trained British actors ["Advantage Britain" by Charles McNulty, Feb. 18]. Watching Dame Dench battle-ax her way through her own vulnerabilities and angst while simultaneously and systematically dismantling several lives was breathtaking ["Notes on a Scandal"]. "It's a minefield" indeed! Dame Mirren's flawless roaming from the sublime to the meticulous and back was mesmerizing ["The Queen"]. They inhabit every role they accept, it seems.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1993
It was with interest that I read Sarah Montoya's oh, so witty rejoinder in last Sunday's letters. The lady doth protest too much, methinks, and is not wont to speak plain and to the purpose. I too sallied forth to view "Much Ado About Nothing" and left yon theater greatly impressed with this delightful film. Kenneth Branagh superbly accomplished what he set out to do. That is, to put it in today's parlance, make the Bard accessible. What so many purists seem to forget is that Shakespeare wrote his plays not just for the elitist few, but for the uneducated masses as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2009 | David Ng
Shakespeare's Globe, the renowned London theater company, is returning to the United States this fall in a tour that will make two November stops in Southern California -- at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica (Nov. 19-29) and at UC Santa Barbara (Nov. 13-15). The company will perform Shakespeare's "Love's Labour's Lost" using a traditional Elizabethan staging that involves elaborate costumes and a mostly bare stage. -- David Ng
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2009 | Tim Rutten
Were Homer more proximate to us in time, perhaps we'd worry the details of his daily life as furiously as we do William Shakespeare's. Perhaps -- but probably not. Homer, after all, wrote in Greek and, though Robert Fagles' and Richmond Lattimore's translations are everything a contemporary reader could want, their language is not the poet's.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2007
THANK you for your much-deserved attention to classically trained British actors ["Advantage Britain" by Charles McNulty, Feb. 18]. Watching Dame Dench battle-ax her way through her own vulnerabilities and angst while simultaneously and systematically dismantling several lives was breathtaking ["Notes on a Scandal"]. "It's a minefield" indeed! Dame Mirren's flawless roaming from the sublime to the meticulous and back was mesmerizing ["The Queen"]. They inhabit every role they accept, it seems.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2006 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
ON a Warner Bros. Television sound stage, Sting is perched on a stool, singing a plaintive, urgent ballad to an absent lover. No surprises here -- except that the song, "Come Again," is more than 400 years old. It was composed by John Dowland, a contemporary of Shakespeare who is considered one of England's greatest songwriters.
BOOKS
February 8, 2004 | Marc Aronson, Marc Aronson is the author of "Witch-Hunt: Mysteries of the Salem Witch Trials" and "Sir Walter Ralegh and the Quest for El Dorado."
Why isn't there a great movie about Sir Walter Ralegh? His life had everything a star could want: Born a commoner, he fought, flattered and seduced his way through a byzantine court filled with great men to win the favor of England's greatest queen. Once he had money and power he devoted himself to establishing colonies in Ireland and America.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2002
I certainly sympathize with David Rambo's annoyance with impolite audience members who prevent each other from listening to a play due to ringing cell phones, crinkling cellophane wrappers and talking among themselves ("The Drama of Listening," Oct. 20). What I find odd is his romantic harking back to the time of Elizabethan drama when theatergoers actually went to "hear a play." Rambo seems to have overlooked that Elizabethan audiences had the far more distracting problems of constant chattering (especially from the rabble in the pit)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2002
I certainly sympathize with David Rambo's annoyance with impolite audience members who prevent each other from listening to a play due to ringing cell phones, crinkling cellophane wrappers and talking among themselves ("The Drama of Listening," Oct. 20). What I find odd is his romantic harking back to the time of Elizabethan drama when theatergoers actually went to "hear a play." Rambo seems to have overlooked that Elizabethan audiences had the far more distracting problems of constant chattering (especially from the rabble in the pit)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1998
Although I found his article interesting, Richard Natale's revelations are hardly new ("Political Intrigue," Feb. 17). The sex lives of public officials have been entertaining theater-goers for centuries. If you doubt it, then check out a copy of "Oedipus Rex" the next time you're in your local public library or rent a copy of "Hamlet" during your next trip to the video store. Audiences today are no better or worse than their Greek and Elizabethan ancestors. Sophocles and Shakespeare knew what sells, and so do Barry Levinson, Mike Nichols, et al. CINDY MEDIAVILLA Los Angeles I think both Natale and Mike Nichols missed the boat while climbing on the spin wagon.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1998
I wish to clarify the statement in Kenneth Turan's review of "Shakespeare in Love" that Marc Norman "came up with the deft original idea of having Shakespeare's play and life influence each other" ("A Welcome Winter's Tale," Dec. 11). This is not to disparage the contributions of Norman and co-writer Tom Stoppard, but the idea has been around a good while. Faye Kellerman, a famed local mystery author, dramatized Shakespeare's love life in her 1989 novel, "The Quality of Mercy--A Novel of Intrigue in Elizabethan England."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1998
Although I found his article interesting, Richard Natale's revelations are hardly new ("Political Intrigue," Feb. 17). The sex lives of public officials have been entertaining theater-goers for centuries. If you doubt it, then check out a copy of "Oedipus Rex" the next time you're in your local public library or rent a copy of "Hamlet" during your next trip to the video store. Audiences today are no better or worse than their Greek and Elizabethan ancestors. Sophocles and Shakespeare knew what sells, and so do Barry Levinson, Mike Nichols, et al. CINDY MEDIAVILLA Los Angeles I think both Natale and Mike Nichols missed the boat while climbing on the spin wagon.
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