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Ellen Albertini Dow

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February 21, 1998 | BRETT JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She performed in New York's Yiddish theater and taught drama for 30 years around Los Angeles. But nothing in her life prepared Ellen Albertini Dow for her scene-stealing role as a hip-hop granny in "The Wedding Singer." In the film, Dow plays Rosie, a free-spirited old lady who grabs the mike at her 50th wedding anniversary reception and covers the 1979 rap classic "Rapper's Delight" as she sweetly yet confidently raps: "I said a hip-hop a-hippity to the hippity hip-hop. . . ."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1998 | BRETT JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She performed in New York's Yiddish theater and taught drama for 30 years around Los Angeles. But nothing in her life prepared Ellen Albertini Dow for her scene-stealing role as a hip-hop granny in "The Wedding Singer." In the film, Dow plays Rosie, a free-spirited old lady who grabs the mike at her 50th wedding anniversary reception and covers the 1979 rap classic "Rapper's Delight" as she sweetly yet confidently raps: "I said a hip-hop a-hippity to the hippity hip-hop. . . ."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1998
As a former Pierce College student of Ellen Albertini Dow, "The Wedding Singer's" rapper grandma, I found myself remembering the influence both she and Eugene Dow had on my life ("Newfound Fame for 'Singer's' Grandma," by Brett Johnson, Feb. 21). Your article, however, was too small to cover the generosity and spirit of this tiny lady and her husband, who still reminds me of Gen. Patton. A working writer-producer today, I studied with Eugene Dow for four semesters when I was just out of high school.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2001 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Laugh tracks don't exist in life. So no wonder raising kids is a lot funnier to TV comedy writers than when parents do it. Ditto for children battling angst in homes featuring screwball mothers, fathers and other family members. Real world aside, in sitcom-land it's a blast. The latter describes "Maybe It's Me," a smart, witty new comedy from the WB so promising that it has "Malcolm in the Middle" potential.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2006 | Desson Thomson, Washington Post
What's with naughty old-timers in movies lately? In "Mrs. Henderson Presents," recently widowed heiress Laura Henderson (Judi Dench) refuses to conclude her years in a flurry of charity functions, jewelry shopping and dull hobbies. Instead she buys an old theater in London's West End and stages all-nude musical revues, to the delight of 1930s English audiences and the shock of snooty Lord Cromer (Christopher Guest).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1986 | KIRK ELLIS
"Best Man Wins" (at the Odyssey) has such a great second act that you wish writer-director-star Len Austrevich would have left well enough alone. In it, a pair of ne'er-do-well buddies (played by Austrevich and Nicholas Celozzi) find themselves in heaven, only to find that entry is decided by means of a celestial game show presided over by a rotund Deity (a convincing Randy Polk) who looks like Orson Welles.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
"Into the Woods," the new Stephen Sondheim musical at the Old Globe Theatre, is virtually sold out through its closing date, Jan. 11. But there's another choice: A Sondheim show that's been underground for more than 20 years. Sondheim and Arthur Laurents' "Anyone Can Whistle" closed after nine performances on Broadway in 1964, leaving behind a worthy original-cast album and the reputation of being a show ahead of its time.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2001 | Howard Rosenberg
The headlines are grim, all the more reason for laughter. Yet Americans are entirely too sad, our dominant frame of reference pain. Roaring, bellowing, jaw-aching, knee-slapping yuks are needed. Fun is needed. So right on cue tonight are two terrific new series that inexplicably are struggling to find audiences in their infancy. One is wittily bent "Maybe It's Me" on the WB, the other Fox's "Pasadena," pound for pound more trashy joy than any hour in prime time.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2007
Friday Across the Universe The songs of the Beatles score this love story set against the political and social upheaval of the 1960s. Julie Taymor (Broadway's "The Lion King") directs. With Evan Rachel Wood, Jim Sturgess (below), Joe Anderson. Written by Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais from a story by Taymor & Clement & La Frenais.
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