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Ellen Dubois

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OPINION
February 1, 2010
Howard Zinn died last week. Since 1980, his controversial "A People's History of the United States" has sold more than 2 million copies, and it has given Zinn -- a professor, social activist, shipyard worker and World War II bombardier -- his own shot at being more than a footnote in the march of time. Marjorie Miller Marjorie Miller interviewed his colleagues to start history's assessment. Sean Wilentz Princeton University, "The Age of Reagan: A History, 1974-2008" What he did was take all of the guys in white hats and put them in black hats, and vice versa.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1995
As five of the UCLA faculty members who taught in an innovative undergraduate course on the history and politics of affirmative action, we were disturbed by comments made by University of California's Regent Ward Connerly criticizing the course (July 6). "The History and Politics of Affirmative Action" brought depth, thoughtful analysis and reasoned debate to a significant and timely social issue on which there are fundamental differences. The course addressed the historical and legal roots of affirmative action, as well as economic, social and educational issues.
NATIONAL
January 16, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz
The number of women who are their families' sole breadwinners has risen, as has the number of unemployed fathers, according to Census Bureau data released Friday. The trend has been accelerated by the recession, but what's unclear is whether the shift will continue, said Kristin Smith, a family demographer at the University of New Hampshire. "Whether this trend is short-lived or is lasting will depend on how the economy comes out of the recession," she said. If the male-dominated jobs in manufacturing and construction industries don't pick up, the nation could see a continued reliance on women as the only wage earners for families, Smith said.
NEWS
November 18, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The University of California Board of Regents sidestepped a decision on a student fee increase Friday, approving a $2.7-billion funding proposal for next year that specifies only what the university needs, not how it is going to get it. Last month, UC officials had suggested that a 7.1% fee increase would be necessary next year in order to comply with a four-year compact negotiated with the governor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
It's the latest hot-button issue--the subject of a statewide initiative, planned legislative hearings and ongoing public debate. Now, at UCLA, affirmative action is something else as well: the focus of scholarly study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2006 | Stuart Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
The conservative activist who is waging a campaign against what he contends are UCLA's "radical professors" Monday withdrew his offer to pay students bounties of up to $100 per class to provide information about their teachers. But he pledged to continue his effort with unpaid volunteers. The $100 offer enabled activist Andrew Jones to create a national media stir last week but also drew heavy criticism from faculty who complained of a "witch hunt."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1999 | SUE FOX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After a year and a half of legal arm-wrestling, the city's offer of four softball fields for a suburban girls league may not seem like much. But experts, steeped in a quarter-century of battles to level the playing field for women, say it was. Since 1972, when Congress passed a federal statute known as Title IX that banned sex discrimination in public and private education, most skirmishes have played out at schools and universities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2006 | Stuart Silverstein and Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writers
A fledgling alumni group headed by a former campus Republican leader is offering students payments of up to $100 per class to provide information on instructors who are "abusive, one-sided or off-topic" in advocating political ideologies. The year-old Bruin Alumni Assn. says its "Exposing UCLA's Radical Professors" initiative takes aim at faculty "actively proselytizing their extreme views in the classroom, whether or not the commentary is relevant to the class topic."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
It's the latest hot-button issue--the subject of a statewide initiative, planned legislative hearings and ongoing public debate. Now, at UCLA, affirmative action is something else as well: the focus of scholarly study. In what some are calling a triumph over academic bureaucracy, UCLA has done in a few weeks what usually takes months: created a new course, "The History and Politics of Affirmative Action," the first in the University of California system to focus on escalating arguments over race- and gender-based preferences.
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