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May 24, 1990 | LEON WHITESON
When he was a young architect in the early 1950s, Lou Naidorf of Welton Becket Associates was given the chance to design the Capitol Records Tower, today one of Hollywood's boldest landmarks. The world's first completely circular office building, Capitol Records was shaped to resemble a stack of 45-r.p.m. platters topped by a symbolic stylus. The tower's simple metaphor was deliberately designed to create an instant presence.
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NEWS
May 24, 1990 | LEON WHITESON
When he was a young architect in the early 1950s, Lou Naidorf of Welton Becket Associates was given the chance to design the Capitol Records Tower, today one of Hollywood's boldest landmarks. The world's first completely circular office building, Capitol Records was shaped to resemble a stack of 45-r.p.m. platters topped by a symbolic stylus. The tower's simple metaphor was deliberately designed to create an instant presence.
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REAL ESTATE
April 16, 1989
Construction has begun on a $50-million Beverly Hills office building that is touted as being the first structure along Wilshire Boulevard to have a classic French design. The three-story, 85,000-square-foot structure at 9150 Wilshire Blvd. is expected to be finished in early 1990. The exterior of the building will look as if it were made of weathered stone. A courtyard in the center of the horseshoe-shaped building will feature a large, hand-carved fountain and will be paved with limestone and terra cotta.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1995 | MAKI BECKER
The Los Angeles school board has selected an architect to design the reconstruction of Van Gogh Elementary, the only school in the district that was completely destroyed by the Northridge earthquake. Kazumi Adachi & Associates Inc. won the bid at $4.65 million to "replace existing earthquake damaged facilities" at Van Gogh, according to a report submitted Friday by the Board of Education. To provide any additional reconstruction services, Ellerbe Becket Inc. will be paid $22,560.40.
REAL ESTATE
November 26, 1989 | RON GALPERIN, Galperin is a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer who has covered the commercial real estate scene for several years
First Interstate World Center in downtown Los Angeles opened last week with Arthur Andersen & Co. as its first tenant--marking completion of the tallest tower in the western United States. The $350-million project boasts 73 stories and about 1.5 million square feet. An astounding 80% has been pre-leased, with tenants such as First Interstate Bancorp, law firm Latham & Watkins, Pacific Enterprises and Arthur Andersen taking the lion's share.
REAL ESTATE
June 19, 1994
Eleven Los Angeles architecture firms received honor or merit awards in the annual statewide competition sponsored by the American Institute of Architects, California Council (AIACC). From a total of 220 entries, 11 honor and eight merit awards were selected. Five honor and six merit awards were given to L.A. firms. Honor Awards to Los Angeles Firms Project: Showscan Prototype Theater, City Walk, Universal City, a 4,000-square-foot motion-based attraction. Architect: Ellerbe Becket Inc.
REAL ESTATE
September 11, 1988 | EVELYN De WOLFE, Times Staff Writer
A public ceremony will be held Friday to officially mark the start of construction on Cerritos Towne Center, a $225-million mixed-use project of Transpacific Development Co. adjacent to the Artesia (91) Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1994 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 23-year-old Bullock's department store in Northridge Fashion Center, reduced to little more than a pile of rubble by Monday morning's earthquake, will likely be demolished, experts said Tuesday. If the store is rebuilt, construction costs could run up to $28 million, they said. The cost to replace damaged or destroyed merchandise inside the store was not known.
REAL ESTATE
February 7, 1993 | EVELYN DE WOLFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A wide range of projects, from a modernistic home in Brentwood to a major convention center in Nara, Japan, won top honors at the 1992 design awards program of the Los Angeles chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Sixteen honor awards, merit awards and citations were given to Los Angeles area architects in the categories of architecture, interior architecture and unbuilt works selected from more than 230 entries completed within the last two years.
REAL ESTATE
May 12, 1991 | LEON WHITESON, Whiteson is a Los Angeles free-lancer who writes on architectural topics.
Spring Street, known in grander days as the Wall Street of the West, has had a hard struggle over the past decade to regain some vestige of its former respectability. Bordered by Skid Row, divided from the new, largely Anglo, Bunker Hill commercial center by Latino Broadway, Spring Street still limps along, despite an infusion of $50 million in public money by the Community Redevelopment Agency.
REAL ESTATE
July 4, 1993 | LEON WHITESON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Whiteson writes on architecture for The Times
During the 1930s and into the early 1940s, Los Angeles' public agencies generated a splendid style of architecture. Known generically as "PWA Moderne," after the Depression-era Public Works Administration, the style was noted for its muscular honesty and graceful, uncluttered details.
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