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Elliott Pinkney

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NEWS
August 31, 1989 | MICHELE FUETSCH, Times Staff Writer
When artist Elliott Pinkney of Compton says, "Art is all around us," he is speaking philosophically. "It might be in the form of a fine car or a beautiful watch, a fancy suit. It's still a piece of art," he said recently, explaining that he believes art is more than paintings hanging on museum walls. When Pinkney says art is "all around" Compton, though, he is probably speaking literally about his work. For years, his murals have adorned walls throughout the city.
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NEWS
August 31, 1989 | MICHELE FUETSCH, Times Staff Writer
When artist Elliott Pinkney of Compton says, "Art is all around us," he is speaking philosophically. "It might be in the form of a fine car or a beautiful watch, a fancy suit. It's still a piece of art," he said recently, explaining that he believes art is more than paintings hanging on museum walls. When Pinkney says art is "all around" Compton, though, he is probably speaking literally about his work. For years, his murals have adorned walls throughout the city.
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NEWS
February 25, 1989 | ELLEN MELINKOFF
Black History Month ends this weekend with several special children's events planned at museums. Today, at the Long Beach Children's Museum, youngsters will learn to make traditional African designs when artist Elliott Pinkney demonstrates silk-screening techniques in the museum's Art Cafe. The workshops, suitable for children 5 and older, will begin at 11:30 a.m. and 12:15, 1:30, 2:15 and 3 p.m. Reservations are advised. Smocks should be worn. The museum is at 445 Long Beach Blvd.
NEWS
November 18, 2004 | Brenda Rees
Kids can sample storytelling flavors on Saturday at the California African American Museum -- from swashbuckling aviators, to a lesson on how chocolate is made, to the similarities between hip-hop and swing music. The annual "Ears Are Burning, Children Are Learning" program features presentations from children's book authors, illustrators and performers who seek to stimulate creativity in kids of all ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2003 | Christopher Reynolds
After three decades of painting murals in and around Los Angeles on themes of social justice, race relations and urban poverty, Elliott Pinkney is making authorities nervous -- in Milwaukee. Pinkney, 69, still lives in Compton, and two dozen of his works, from a portrait of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to an illustration of the dangers of smoking, remain on walls from Long Beach to Pacoima.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1997 | JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two decades after musicians and actors took their final bow at Watts' Mafundi Institute, the fading imprint of the cultural academy's logo clung stubbornly to its front wall. As city projects and small businesses moved into the building after 1975, whitewashing failed to smother the mural of proud African faces. And, for many locals, the Mafundi symbol continued to evoke memories of a renaissance that flourished after the 1965 riots.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW
The visual arts account for $316,537 of $2,844,925 in L.A. Endowment for the Arts grants, which will be formally announced by the Cultural Affairs Department next Sunday. Many of the programs financed involve working with children, ranging from latchkey kids to troubled teens.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW
After a year of searching for a location, San Francisco artist Bruce Pollack has erected his "Homeless Sink Project" on Mill Street at the corner of Industrial Street, outside of Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions. Financed by the Foundation for Art Resources, the project features a functional, tombstone-shaped sink inscribed with the words "That Thou Art Be Art Thou." It was originally planned for MacArthur Park, but was halted because of park officials' worries about the water shortage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1992 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Peterson rides the Metro Blue Line just about every day. Lately, the 68-year-old Long Beach resident has been wondering about "those things over there"--three unusual objects perched above the ice plant on the east bank of the Wardlow station. Were they some sort of newfangled technology to relay train signals? "They're sculpture," said Jon Moynes, project manager for the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission program conveniently dubbed Art for Rail Transit (A-R-T).
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | RON EGGERS, Ron Eggers is a free-lance writer who occasionally contributes to The Times Orange County Edition.
In recent months, South-Central Los Angeles has mostly been in the headlines alongside such topics as urban unrest, the plight of the inner city and the need to rebuild. But South-Central is a diverse, dynamic community that some say is being shortchanged by the overwhelming negative publicity. It's an area made up of numerous middle-class communities and business districts with a rich African-American heritage.
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | MICHELE FUETSCH, Times Staff Writer
When artist Elliott Pinkney of Compton says "art is all around us," he is speaking philosophically. "It might be in the form of a fine car or a beautiful watch, a fancy suit. It's still a piece of art," he said recently, explaining that he believes art is more than paintings hanging on museum walls. When Pinkney says that art is "all around" Compton, though, he is probably speaking literally about his work. For years his murals have adorned walls throughout the city.
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