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NEWS
October 10, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A few predictions for the next century: The tax system will be overhauled, if not abolished altogether. Politicians will be among the most respected members of society. And the United States will enter an era reminiscent of the glory days of England in the 17th Century, complete with castles, grand balls and bejeweled clothing. And forget cautious speculation about when the Dow Jones industrial average will break 4,000.
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NEWS
October 10, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A few predictions for the next century: The tax system will be overhauled, if not abolished altogether. Politicians will be among the most respected members of society. And the United States will enter an era reminiscent of the glory days of England in the 17th Century, complete with castles, grand balls and bejeweled clothing. And forget cautious speculation about when the Dow Jones industrial average will break 4,000.
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NEWS
October 10, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While Elliott Wave theorists track human events through the ages to make their economic forecasts, one Orange County group takes an even less conventional approach: It bases its predictions on such indicators as weather patterns and the animal population. The Foundation for the Study of Cycles is an Irvine group whose following includes investors, stock analysts, even a Nobel prize-winning economist, Maurice Allais.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A few predictions for the next century: The tax system will be overhauled, if not abolished altogether. Politicians will be among the most respected members of society. And the United States will enter an era reminiscent of the glory days of England in the 17th Century, complete with castles, grand balls and bejeweled clothing. And forget cautious speculation about when the Dow Jones industrial average will break 4,000.
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