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Ellison S Onizuka

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2011 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
Quite a few of those who gathered Thursday along the angled Little Tokyo block named for the first Japanese American astronaut said it was the closest they would ever get to a space shuttle launch. They had come to see a newly restored one-tenth-scale model of the Challenger space shuttle be hoisted atop the memorial to Ellison S. Onizuka, one of the seven astronauts who died when the shuttle exploded on Jan. 28, 1986. At 1 p.m., when the big moment was scheduled, people clutching cameras positioned themselves, lining the balcony of the Weller Court shopping center on one side of the monument as well as the roof and each level of the parking garage on the other side.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2011 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
Quite a few of those who gathered Thursday along the angled Little Tokyo block named for the first Japanese American astronaut said it was the closest they would ever get to a space shuttle launch. They had come to see a newly restored one-tenth-scale model of the Challenger space shuttle be hoisted atop the memorial to Ellison S. Onizuka, one of the seven astronauts who died when the shuttle exploded on Jan. 28, 1986. At 1 p.m., when the big moment was scheduled, people clutching cameras positioned themselves, lining the balcony of the Weller Court shopping center on one side of the monument as well as the roof and each level of the parking garage on the other side.
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NEWS
January 27, 1987 | Associated Press
A granite sculpture of a Japanese lantern was dedicated Sunday as a memorial to space shuttle Challenger astronaut Lt. Col. Ellison S. Onizuka, the first Asian-American to enter space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1990 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Buddhist blessings and bittersweet memories, a 27-foot-long replica of the space shuttle Challenger was unveiled in Little Tokyo on Friday in honor of Col. Ellison Onizuka, one of seven crew members who died in the shuttle explosion more than four years ago. One-tenth the size of the Challenger, the memorial stands in the middle of a plaza named after Onizuka, the first Asian-American in space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1987
Weller Street in Little Tokyo has officially been renamed Astronaut Ellison S. Onizuka Street in honor of the astronaut who died last year aboard the space shuttle Challenger. During a Friday ceremony, Mayor Tom Bradley presented the astronaut's widow, Lorna, with a replica of the Onizuka street sign and praised him as a role model for all Americans "who want to reach for the stars."
NEWS
June 3, 1986 | Associated Press
Ellison S. Onizuka was buried in a Buddhist ceremony Monday, the last of Challenger's seven crew members to be laid to rest. After an honor guard fired a 21-gun salute and a buglar played "Taps," Air Force jets flew over the cemetery in a "missing man" formation for the Air Force lieutenant colonel. About 700 mourners attended the service in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1990 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Buddhist blessings and bittersweet memories, a 27-foot-long replica of the space shuttle Challenger was unveiled in Little Tokyo on Friday in honor of Col. Ellison Onizuka, one of seven crew members who died in the shuttle explosion more than four years ago. One-tenth the size of the Challenger, the memorial stands in the middle of a plaza named after Onizuka, the first Asian-American in space.
NEWS
February 6, 1987
Renaming of a Little Tokyo street after Ellison S. Onizuka--the Japanese-American astronaut killed with his fellow crew members in the Jan. 28, 1986, explosion of the space shuttle Challenger--was tentatively approved in a 10-0 vote of the Los Angeles City Council. Weller Street will become Astronaut Ellison S. Onizuka Street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan signed legislation Monday authorizing the posthumous promotion of Challenger shuttle astronaut Ellison S. Onizuka to full colonel in the Air Force. Onizuka was killed in the Challenger explosion Jan. 28.
NEWS
June 2, 1986
Challenger astronaut Ellison S. Onizuka is to be buried today with full military honors in a public service at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific at Punchbowl in Honolulu. A wake and funeral rites took place at Kona Hongwanji Buddhist Mission in Kealakekua, Hawaii. Onizuka, 39, a lieutenant colonel in the Air Force, and six other crew members were killed Jan. 28 when the shuttle exploded shortly after launching from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1987
Weller Street in Little Tokyo has officially been renamed Astronaut Ellison S. Onizuka Street in honor of the astronaut who died last year aboard the space shuttle Challenger. During a Friday ceremony, Mayor Tom Bradley presented the astronaut's widow, Lorna, with a replica of the Onizuka street sign and praised him as a role model for all Americans "who want to reach for the stars."
NEWS
January 27, 1987 | Associated Press
A granite sculpture of a Japanese lantern was dedicated Sunday as a memorial to space shuttle Challenger astronaut Lt. Col. Ellison S. Onizuka, the first Asian-American to enter space.
NEWS
June 3, 1986 | Associated Press
Ellison S. Onizuka was buried in a Buddhist ceremony Monday, the last of Challenger's seven crew members to be laid to rest. After an honor guard fired a 21-gun salute and a buglar played "Taps," Air Force jets flew over the cemetery in a "missing man" formation for the Air Force lieutenant colonel. About 700 mourners attended the service in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1989 | Researcher Cecilia Rasmussen
The names of many Los Angeles streets have changed repeatedly over the years, reflecting the city's transformation from a tiny Mexican colonial town to a booming metropolis. Some streets, predictably, honor war heroes and explorers. But others have been named for trees, actors, land developers and--in one case--the proximity of a bullfighting ring. These days, it is not easy to change the name of a street.
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