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April 30, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Staff Writer
No on-stage clown, no offstage food-fighter, no talk-show denizen, no budding conductor--Elmar Oliveira is not your garden-variety violin virtuoso of the 1980s. No, Oliveira simply plays the violin like a master--with brilliance, technical resourcefulness, personal involvement and unfeigned charisma. He may be the Ivry Gitlis of his generation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1992 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a hectic Monday afternoon recently, violinist Elmar Oliveira motored the 75 miles from his home in Croton-on-Hudson, N.Y., down to pianist Horacio Gutierrez's Manhattan apartment. They were eager to rehearse for one of their rare duo dates Friday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, where they'll grapple with music of Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms and Ravel.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1989 | TERRY McQUILKIN
A masterful reading of Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto by one of the winners of the 1978 Tchaikovsky Competition highlighted Saturday's Pasadena Symphony program at Pasadena Civic Auditorium. Exhibiting sure-fire accuracy and superb bow control, and producing a tone both warm and penetrating, violinist Elmar Oliveira gave an account that was remarkably articulate and full of panache. Attacking each phrase with confidence, he brought unusual tension and excitement to the work.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1989 | TERRY McQUILKIN
A masterful reading of Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto by one of the winners of the 1978 Tchaikovsky Competition highlighted Saturday's Pasadena Symphony program at Pasadena Civic Auditorium. Exhibiting sure-fire accuracy and superb bow control, and producing a tone both warm and penetrating, violinist Elmar Oliveira gave an account that was remarkably articulate and full of panache. Attacking each phrase with confidence, he brought unusual tension and excitement to the work.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1992 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a hectic Monday afternoon recently, violinist Elmar Oliveira motored the 75 miles from his home in Croton-on-Hudson, N.Y., down to pianist Horacio Gutierrez's Manhattan apartment. They were eager to rehearse for one of their rare duo dates Friday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, where they'll grapple with music of Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms and Ravel.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1986 | DANIEL CARIAGA
At 33, Hugh Wolff is one of the youngest music directors of a major U.S. orchestra--the New Jersey Symphony. But Wolff's credentials are in order. He served for three years as an Exxon/Arts Endowment conductor at the National Symphony in Washington, working under Mstislav Rostropovich. Then, in 1982, the red-haired, Paris-born American musician became associate conductor of the orchestra for three years. He has served as guest conductor with the orchestras of Chicago, Houston, St.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2001
The Pasadena Symphony, conducted by music director Jorge Mester, will open its 74th season with a world premiere concert performance of the Erich Korngold arrangement of Mendelssohn's "A Midsummer Night's Dream," Oct. 20 in Pasadena Civic Auditorium. This arrangement, created by Korngold for Max Reinhardt's 1935 film of Shakespeare's play, required more music than Mendelssohn had written.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2002 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep into his 17th season as the Pasadena Symphony's music director, Jorge Mester concocted another striking program. Heard Saturday night in Civic Auditorium, this one culminated in Brahms' Violin Concerto, preceded by two striking American ballet scores from the mid-20th century: Stravinsky's "Jeu de Cartes" and Copland's "Billy the Kid." Brahms' main course dominated the evening, yet the two salad courses offered variety and delight.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1996
Jorge Mester, music director of the Pasadena Symphony, will lead the orchestra in all five of its 1996-97 season concerts in Pasadena Civic Auditorium. The season opens at 8 p.m. (note new time) Oct. 19, when Mester will lead a program consisting of Samuel Barber's "Essay No. 2," the Grieg Piano Concerto with soloist Jorge Federico Osorio and the D-minor Symphony by Cesar Franck. The season will continue Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1986 | DANIEL CARIAGA
At 33, Hugh Wolff is one of the youngest music directors of a major U.S. orchestra--the New Jersey Symphony. But Wolff's credentials are in order. He served for three years as an Exxon/Arts Endowment conductor at the National Symphony in Washington, working under Mstislav Rostropovich. Then, in 1982, the red-haired, Paris-born American musician became associate conductor of the orchestra for three years. He has served as guest conductor with the orchestras of Chicago, Houston, St.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Staff Writer
No on-stage clown, no offstage food-fighter, no talk-show denizen, no budding conductor--Elmar Oliveira is not your garden-variety violin virtuoso of the 1980s. No, Oliveira simply plays the violin like a master--with brilliance, technical resourcefulness, personal involvement and unfeigned charisma. He may be the Ivry Gitlis of his generation.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1990 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
One tell-tale sign of JoAnn Falletta's breakthrough status in the male-dominated world of conducting could be seen Saturday when the Long Beach Symphony opened its season at the Terrace Theater: a tuxedoed cameraman in the far stage corner training his CBS lens on her every move. But Falletta, now wielding the baton for her second year in Long Beach, justifies the media attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1997 | John Henken
The common heritage of these striking pieces is quite apparent in their shapes and dimensions and in their remarkable combinations of orchestral color and solo verve. Yet so is the distinctive character of each--the intense Violin Concerto, lyrical Flute Concerto, dramatic Piano Concerto and mysterious Clarinet Concerto.
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