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Elmer Bernstein

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2004 | Claudia Luther, Times Staff Writer
Elmer Bernstein, the Academy Award-winning composer who created some of the most recognizable music in American films, died Wednesday at his home in Ojai after a lengthy illness, his publicist, Kathy Moulton, said. He was 82. "He was the consummate composer. He was classically trained and could do it all," said Marilyn Bergman, president of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2004 | Claudia Luther, Times Staff Writer
Elmer Bernstein, the Academy Award-winning composer who created some of the most recognizable music in American films, died Wednesday at his home in Ojai after a lengthy illness, his publicist, Kathy Moulton, said. He was 82. "He was the consummate composer. He was classically trained and could do it all," said Marilyn Bergman, president of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, Zan Stewart frequently writes about jazz for Calendar.
As a soundtrack composer, Elmer Bernstein sees himself as an outsider who arrives at the end of the filmmaking process, one who is there to provide musical comments that may directly affect the way that movie plays. He may be the last to arrive, but the show can't go on without him. Consistently active since the early '50s, Bernstein has scored more than 180 films whose soundtracks cover a vast range. "I've had several careers" is how he puts it.
NEWS
August 29, 2002 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Attaching a "Hollywood Goes Orchestral" tag to Tuesday's concert by the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra might be accurate, but it was also misleading. In a program in which Elmer Bernstein's engaging Concerto for Guitar and Orchestra--written for the evening's featured soloist, Christopher Parkening--had its Los Angeles premiere, and a suite from Alex North's "Cleopatra" score had its U.S. premiere, music-for-its-own sake was the thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Elmer Bernstein Honored: Elmer Bernstein, composer of the film scores for "The Magnificent Seven," "Thoroughly Modern Millie" and more than 50 other films, was honored Wednesday with the Golden Soundtrack Award from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. The award was presented at ASCAP's Film and Television Music Awards dinner at the Beverly Wilshire. Other film composers honored included Georges Delerue for "Twins" and Randy Newman for "Parenthood."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2001
Elmer Bernstein will be honored at 8 tonight at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, 8949 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. Carl Reiner will host the event, which will include tributes from directors John Landis ("National Lampoon's Animal House") and Carl Franklin ("Devil in a Blue Dress"); producer Noel Pearson ("My Left Foot"); actor James Coburn ("The Magnificent Seven"); composer Terence Blanchard; and Cecelia DeMille Presley, granddaughter of director Cecil B.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Elmer Bernstein's "Songs of Love and Loathing" promise more than they deliver. Setting seven mildly contrasting texts from various sources in a 20-minute song cycle, the celebrated film composer has produced a very attractive but pallid poetic mural which seldom evokes strong feelings. Given its world premiere performance Saturday night, the new work sounded gorgeous but caused few goose-bumps. It used the considerable resources of the Santa Barbara Symphony and conductor Varujan Kojian, plus the warm and pointed vocal skills of mezzo-soprano soloist Elizabeth Mannion.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While watching the rip-roaring new DVD of the 1960 western "The Magnificent Seven" (MGM, $20), check out Steve McQueen's star-making performance as one of the hired gunslingers. Though he didn't have many lines in the movie, he more than made up for it by stealing scenes with his actions--including using various facial expressions and playing with his hat. And it worked.
NEWS
August 29, 2002 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Attaching a "Hollywood Goes Orchestral" tag to Tuesday's concert by the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra might be accurate, but it was also misleading. In a program in which Elmer Bernstein's engaging Concerto for Guitar and Orchestra--written for the evening's featured soloist, Christopher Parkening--had its Los Angeles premiere, and a suite from Alex North's "Cleopatra" score had its U.S. premiere, music-for-its-own sake was the thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2001 | JON BURLINGAME, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many people spend a lifetime toiling at the same job. What's unique about Elmer Bernstein--now cel-ebrating his 50th year as a composer for films--is that few in this very select group manage to survive so long in such an exacting, often frustratingly trendy profession. "Elmer Bernstein is movie music," says film historian and commentator Leonard Maltin.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2001
Elmer Bernstein will be honored at 8 tonight at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, 8949 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. Carl Reiner will host the event, which will include tributes from directors John Landis ("National Lampoon's Animal House") and Carl Franklin ("Devil in a Blue Dress"); producer Noel Pearson ("My Left Foot"); actor James Coburn ("The Magnificent Seven"); composer Terence Blanchard; and Cecelia DeMille Presley, granddaughter of director Cecil B.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2001 | JON BURLINGAME, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many people spend a lifetime toiling at the same job. What's unique about Elmer Bernstein--now cel-ebrating his 50th year as a composer for films--is that few in this very select group manage to survive so long in such an exacting, often frustratingly trendy profession. "Elmer Bernstein is movie music," says film historian and commentator Leonard Maltin.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While watching the rip-roaring new DVD of the 1960 western "The Magnificent Seven" (MGM, $20), check out Steve McQueen's star-making performance as one of the hired gunslingers. Though he didn't have many lines in the movie, he more than made up for it by stealing scenes with his actions--including using various facial expressions and playing with his hat. And it worked.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rumor of the youth-obsession in Hollywood may be exaggerated, at least where certain veterans are concerned. Take the case of Elmer Bernstein, one of most prolific and accomplished of American film composers. 1991 has been a year of living productively for the 69-year-old Bernstein. And for many years, he has done much of his work in his Santa Barbara home. For the first time in his 41-year career, Bernstein scored six (count 'em) films in a single year.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, Zan Stewart frequently writes about jazz for Calendar.
As a soundtrack composer, Elmer Bernstein sees himself as an outsider who arrives at the end of the filmmaking process, one who is there to provide musical comments that may directly affect the way that movie plays. He may be the last to arrive, but the show can't go on without him. Consistently active since the early '50s, Bernstein has scored more than 180 films whose soundtracks cover a vast range. "I've had several careers" is how he puts it.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Elmer Bernstein Honored: Elmer Bernstein, composer of the film scores for "The Magnificent Seven," "Thoroughly Modern Millie" and more than 50 other films, was honored Wednesday with the Golden Soundtrack Award from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. The award was presented at ASCAP's Film and Television Music Awards dinner at the Beverly Wilshire. Other film composers honored included Georges Delerue for "Twins" and Randy Newman for "Parenthood."
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rumor of the youth-obsession in Hollywood may be exaggerated, at least where certain veterans are concerned. Take the case of Elmer Bernstein, one of most prolific and accomplished of American film composers. 1991 has been a year of living productively for the 69-year-old Bernstein. And for many years, he has done much of his work in his Santa Barbara home. For the first time in his 41-year career, Bernstein scored six (count 'em) films in a single year.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1998
Thank you for Josef Woodard's interview with Elmer Bernstein, David Raksin, Laurence Rosenthal and Leonard Rosenman ("Scoring Some More Respect," June 14). Respect begins at home, however. One shudders to think of the editorial hatchet-job that was performed to cram the ideas of these four illustrious composers into a two-page article. Each of them merits more than that space in his own right, and The Times is long overdue in this regard. JANE BROCKMAN Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Elmer Bernstein's "Songs of Love and Loathing" promise more than they deliver. Setting seven mildly contrasting texts from various sources in a 20-minute song cycle, the celebrated film composer has produced a very attractive but pallid poetic mural which seldom evokes strong feelings. Given its world premiere performance Saturday night, the new work sounded gorgeous but caused few goose-bumps. It used the considerable resources of the Santa Barbara Symphony and conductor Varujan Kojian, plus the warm and pointed vocal skills of mezzo-soprano soloist Elizabeth Mannion.
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