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Ely Guerra

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April 6, 2002 | AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ely Guerra is too short for the stool she's supposed to sit on during her performance for "LATV Live," the Latin music cable program on KJLA. The diminutive Mexican singer-songwriter perches on the edge of the seat, holding her big pink acoustic guitar. Her position looks awkward, legs spread under her long black dress, one red sandal dangling, the other stretching to reach the floor. Stagehands bring another chair, but this one has armrests she considers too confining.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
Looks like Mexican rocker Ely Guerra is changing her image again. In the process, she may help buff up the image of one of the world's most misunderstood capitals: Mexico City. According to the Mexico City newspaper El Universal , the musician -- a female pioneer of Spanish-language alternative rock -- has been recruited this season to be a spokesperson and frontwoman for the Campaña de Verano (Summer Campaign) by the secretary of tourism for the Distrito Federal, or Mexican Federal District (Mexico City)
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
Looks like Mexican rocker Ely Guerra is changing her image again. In the process, she may help buff up the image of one of the world's most misunderstood capitals: Mexico City. According to the Mexico City newspaper El Universal , the musician -- a female pioneer of Spanish-language alternative rock -- has been recruited this season to be a spokesperson and frontwoman for the Campaña de Verano (Summer Campaign) by the secretary of tourism for the Distrito Federal, or Mexican Federal District (Mexico City)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2002 | AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ely Guerra is too short for the stool she's supposed to sit on during her performance for "LATV Live," the Latin music cable program on KJLA. The diminutive Mexican singer-songwriter perches on the edge of the seat, holding her big pink acoustic guitar. Her position looks awkward, legs spread under her long black dress, one red sandal dangling, the other stretching to reach the floor. Stagehands bring another chair, but this one has armrests she considers too confining.
NEWS
March 14, 2002
* Eels, "Souljacker," DreamWorks. Odd tales that range from bleak to chilling to oddly uplifting. The music is the innovative icing on the cake in this unique collection. Also: B2k, "Iz Hot!" Epic The Corrs, "VH1 Presents ...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2004 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
Sadly, many Americans are likely to judge the state of Latin music by this year's terrible Latin Grammy telecast, a grotesquely distorted program that filtered Latin artists through the ethnocentric prism of American pop culture. The good news is that real Latin music is alive and well and available in the United States, if you look a little. Spain made an indelible mark on 2004 with the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By Todd Martens
Word of a full-length album from the indie music-loving  Silver Lake Chorus has been eloquently buzzing 'round these parts for two years now. The choral group is getting closer. A two-song EP will be self-released on Sept. 18, and now the 25-strong member group has its very own video for the Justin Vernon-penned "From the Snow Tipped Hills. " Fans of Vernon, who is best known for his work as Bon Iver, probably won't be surprised to hear that his words and arrangements translate comfortably to that of a choral group.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
Gaby Moreno, the Guatemalan-born, L.A.-based singer-songwriter-guitarist whose new album "Postales" has critics swooning, is scheduled to perform a live set Saturday night on KPFK-FM's long-running Latin-alternative music program, "Travel Tips for Aztlan. " The show, which airs on 90.7 in Los Angeles and 98.7 in Santa Barbara, runs from 10 p.m. to midnight. Mariluz González, who co-hosts "Travel Tips" with the show's founder, Mark Torres, said Moreno will be performing songs from "Postales," which is being released under the label of Guatemalan superstar Ricardo Arjona.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Times Pop Music Critic
When the members of new band Divine Fits, best described as an indie-rock supergroup (even if it sounds silly), first hooked up, they had a common goal.  “We basically wanted to write songs together, make an album, and go and play those songs live,” guitarist-singer Dan Boeckner said in a recent interview with Pitchfork. “We wanted to start a band.”  Featuring Boeckner, best known for his work with Wolf Parade and Handsome Furs, singer and guitarist Britt Daniel of the band Spoon, and New Bomb Turks drummer Sam Brown, the group hit its goal as it concluded its month-long Los Angeles residency Tuesday night at the gorgeous, acoustically rich Masonic Temple at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery.
NEWS
August 12, 2004 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
New artists seem to come out of the blue. Unfamiliar names pop up more and more on alt-Latino playlists from Los Angeles to Buenos Aires. Unsigned talent keeps jumping into the act. There's so much undiscovered music these days that veteran DJ and critic Josh Kun, who's been monitoring the Latin alternative field for years as a TV and radio host, often finds himself asking in exasperation: "How come I haven't heard of this?"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2003 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
Mexican singer Natalia Lafourcade is looking glum. The petite teenager, nominated for four Latin Grammys, including best new artist, is sitting on a couch at the Santa Monica offices of Sony Discos, leaning forward, looking down. She's surrounded by her band members, including her boyfriend, the bass player, and though she thrives on their company there's a funk in the air. "Que pasa?" asks Michelle Gonzalez, the singer's personal manager. "Everybody's got a bad vibe."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2002 | AGUSTIN GURZA
Irish writers aren't expected to promote U2. Canadian critics aren't bound to back Neil Young. So why must a Mexican reporter be partial to singer Paulina Rubio just because she's Mexican too? That thinking seemed to be behind some of the negative response to an article I recently wrote about Rubio, the former teen star who launched a crossover attempt this year with her English album, "Border Girl." Some readers thought the piece was too critical.
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