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Emails

BUSINESS
November 6, 2013 | By David Lazarus
A recent email informed Jane that she'd won a pile of money. How nice. Jane isn't stupid -- she knows she almost certainly hasn't won anything. But she wants to know if there's an easy way to tell if an email is legit. First of all, she and everyone else can dismiss all those emails saying you've won the lottery or are needed to help move a huge amount of money from an African bank account. Those are bogus. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions Phishing emails can be tougher to spot.
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SPORTS
November 5, 2013 | By David Wharton
A 60-year-old Utah man has pleaded guilty to sending an email threat to the head of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency during its prosecution of Lance Armstrong. Robert Hutchins faces a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine for interstate communications involving a threat. The Associated Press reported he will avoid jail time if the judge accepts a plea bargain offered by prosecutors. On Aug. 23, 2012 -- after Armstrong announced he would not fight USADA's charges -- Hutchins sent an email to the USADA Chief Executive Travis Tygart stating: "Hope you have body guards and bullet proof vest, your (sic)
BUSINESS
November 5, 2013 | David Lazarus
Suzanne Dinatale lost her job as sales manager for a biotech company in July. She applied almost immediately for unemployment benefits to help cushion the blow. Dinatale, 41, of Manhattan Beach, said she had no problem receiving the forms she needed to get the ball rolling with California's Employment Development Department. "After that, nothing," she told me. "I called them and got hung up on. I sent emails that got no responses. " Dinatale is now dipping into her retirement savings to get by. "This is the first time I've ever needed unemployment," she said.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2013 | By David Lazarus
James receives lots of emails offering him big bucks for working from home. And, you may be surprised to learn, he suspects that they're not on the up and up. James asks: Where can he report bogus work-from-home pitches? First of all, not all such emails are scams. There actually are some legitimate work-from-home businesses out there. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions But the vast majority of such come-ons are nothing more than attempts to trick you into revealing personal information, such as your Social Security number.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2013 | By Maeve Reston
When advocates for the president's healthcare law strategized about how to reach the uninsured, they knew exactly whom to tap: mothers who could spread the word about the law's benefits, sign up their younger children and nudge their twentysomethings to take part. But beyond the widely publicized problems with the federal website, low-tech challenges also are complicating that part of the drive to sell the program - even in California, where the state website is running more smoothly and officials are fully behind the push.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
After a trial that started in the spring, lasted through the summer and ended in the fall, one that entailed hundreds of exhibits and staggering legal bills, the Michael Jackson wrongful-death lawsuit finally went to the jury Thursday. What the case may come down to is whether jurors think that Jackson is to blame for his own demise by insisting on hiring the doctor who killed him, or that AEG Live executives were such poor witnesses that nothing they said can be believed. Jackson's mother and three children contend that AEG Live negligently hired and supervised Dr. Conrad Murray, the Las Vegas physician who gave the singer a fatal dose of the anesthetic propofol to combat his severe insomnia.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- This is not the kind of word of mouth LinkedIn was looking for. Last week, four users filed suit against the professional networking service in San Jose federal court. They accused the company of accessing their email accounts without permission and harvesting the addresses of everyone they have ever emailed in order to send out unwanted invitations to join the service. The lawsuit, which is seeking unspecified damages, has seen an outpouring of public interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2013 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Paul Pringle
Internal emails obtained by The Times show Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission officials trying to come up with a strategy to limit public debate on its behind-the-scenes efforts to give USC control of the stadium. Peppered with profanities and name-calling, the emails were the subject of a recent court battle, in which the commission sought their return. A Superior Court judge refused to grant Coliseum officials an emergency order demanding that The Times and others surrender them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2013 | By Jill Cowan, Rong-Gong Lin II and Paul Pringle
The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission unsuccessfully sought an emergency court order Friday demanding The Times and others surrender internal emails about its behind-the-scenes efforts to give USC control of the stadium. In the emails, commission officials discuss such topics as limiting public debate of a proposed USC lease of the taxpayer-owned Coliseum and excluding state officials from closed-door talks on the deal. The documents also show the panel's then-president and its top administrator tallying the commission's expected vote on the lease terms weeks before they were made public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2013 | By Jill Cowan, Rong-Gong Lin II and Paul Pringle
A Superior Court judge Friday refused to grant the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission an emergency order demanding The Times and others surrender internal emails about its behind-the-scenes efforts to give USC control of the stadium. In the emails, commission officials discuss such topics as limiting public debate of a proposed USC lease of the taxpayer-owned Coliseum and excluding state officials from closed-door talks on the deal. The documents also show the panel's then-president and its top administrator tallying the commission's expected vote on the lease terms weeks before they were made public.
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