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Emanuel Danish Lutheran Church

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1995 | BERT ELJERA
For five years, members of a Danish Lutheran congregation in Southern California simply wanted a church they could call home. They ended up building a center for Nordic culture. The Emanuel Danish Lutheran Church in Yorba Linda was dedicated Sunday during a three-hour ceremony that became a religious and cultural celebration. Among about 300 people who attended was Peter Dyvig, the Danish ambassador to the United States. "We were sort of nomadic," said the Rev.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1996 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Anker Nielsen stepped through the doors of Emanuel Danish Lutheran Church on a recent evening, he was greeted by a sight he had not seen since he moved to the United States in 1960. Twenty young girls, all dressed in white and holding candles, marched solemnly through the church, singing "Santa Lucia" a cappella.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1996 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Anker Nielsen stepped through the doors of Emanuel Danish Lutheran Church on a recent evening, he was greeted by a sight he had not seen since he moved to the United States in 1960. Twenty young girls, all dressed in white and holding candles, marched solemnly through the church, singing "Santa Lucia" a cappella.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1995 | BERT ELJERA
For five years, members of a Danish Lutheran congregation in Southern California simply wanted a church they could call home. They ended up building a center for Nordic culture. The Emanuel Danish Lutheran Church in Yorba Linda was dedicated Sunday during a three-hour ceremony that became a religious and cultural celebration. Among about 300 people who attended was Peter Dyvig, the Danish ambassador to the United States. "We were sort of nomadic," said the Rev.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2006 | Mai Tran, Times Staff Writer
The FBI is investigating the defacement of Emanuel Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church in Yorba Linda, which was spray-painted last weekend with violent pictures and obscenities. Although it appears the graffiti attack is not related to the Muslim anger over political cartoons that were printed in Danish newspapers, the FBI typically investigates any attack on a church as a potential hate crime, said agency spokeswoman Laura Eimiller.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1994 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
When Karl Olsen moved to California from his native Denmark, he lived first in Danish-settled Solvang in the Santa Ynez Mountains, where the familiar sounds, sights and scents helped curb his homesickness. But after moving to Villa Park in 1966, Olsen turned to his church, Emanuel Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church. "The church is important to me because it makes me feel like I'm at home," he said. "It keeps that part of my past alive."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2000 | LOUISE ROUG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Every Sunday, Danes journey from all over Southern California to a place more Danish than Solvang--the Emanuel Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church in Yorba Linda. The church is far more than a church. It also is a refuge for homesick immigrants, a social center and a place for second-generation Danish-Americans to explore their heritage. In addition, "You could call the church an unofficial extension of the embassy," said pastor Carsten Boegh Pedersen.
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you squinted your eyes a bit to block out the palm trees, you might think you were in a lively section of Warsaw. The crowd of about 200 Polish-speaking people has gathered to hear Sunday Mass in its native language, in a church aglow with dramatic stained-glass windows depicting scenes from Polish history. Later, in the wood-paneled social hall, the worshipers will brunch on kielbasa and sugar-sprinkled angel wings baked by an 87-year-old parishioner.
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