Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEmbargoes Libya
IN THE NEWS

Embargoes Libya

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An arms depot outside Tripoli exploded, damaging buildings and shattering windows more than two miles away. More than 140 people were injured, and a Libyan official said the death toll had risen to 12 and could go higher because a U.N. embargo prevented some victims from getting treatment abroad. The official news agency said several died while aboard a boat taking them to Malta.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 25, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a country of 5 million people with hundreds of miles of pristine beaches, spectacular unspoiled desert scenery and Roman ruins that sweep away the centuries. But it does have a small image problem. Libya would like to be your tourist destination. Since the country's "revolutionary guide," Moammar Kadafi, agreed in April to hand over two suspects to stand trial in the 1988 Pan Am jet bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland, the U.N.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Caterpillar Unit Is Fined for Libya Deal: The Treasury Department announced $137,500 in fines against Caterpillar Industrial Inc. in connection with the shipment of 298 trucks to Libya in violation of the U.S. embargo. The Treasury said the Mentor, Ohio, company acted as a middleman in the sale to Libya of 226 trucks from South Korea, 70 from Britain and two from Norway. Caterpillar Industrial, a division of Caterpillar Inc. of Peoria, Ill.
NEWS
June 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An arms depot outside Tripoli exploded, damaging buildings and shattering windows more than two miles away. More than 140 people were injured, and a Libyan official said the death toll had risen to 12 and could go higher because a U.N. embargo prevented some victims from getting treatment abroad. The official news agency said several died while aboard a boat taking them to Malta.
NEWS
April 19, 1992 | From Associated Press
The first possible cracks appeared in the U.N. sanctions against Libya on Saturday, when Syria reportedly prepared to fly a jetliner to Tripoli in violation of the air embargo. Meanwhile, a lawyer for the two Libyan suspects in the 1988 bombing of Pan American Flight 103 suggested that they might be willing to stand trial in the United States or Britain--but only if they could be guaranteed a fair hearing.
NEWS
September 25, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a country of 5 million people with hundreds of miles of pristine beaches, spectacular unspoiled desert scenery and Roman ruins that sweep away the centuries. But it does have a small image problem. Libya would like to be your tourist destination. Since the country's "revolutionary guide," Moammar Kadafi, agreed in April to hand over two suspects to stand trial in the 1988 Pan Am jet bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland, the U.N.
NEWS
July 29, 1988 | Washington Post
Eight men, six of them Libyans, were charged Thursday in Alexandria, Va., with using a McLean, Va.-based student group and a District of Columbia travel agency as fronts to violate the U.S. trade embargo on Libya, gather intelligence and "further Libyan foreign revolutionary policy" in the United States. A 40-count indictment handed up by a federal grand jury charged the defendants with conspiracy, money laundering and violations of U.S. trade sanctions against Libya.
NEWS
August 31, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan on Friday proclaimed himself honored to accept a human rights award named for Libyan ruler Moammar Kadafi but turned down its accompanying $250,000 prize to avoid legal problems in the United States. Standing before emotional supporters who cried "Victory!" and "God is great!"
NEWS
April 3, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crowds chanting slogans against the West attacked foreign embassies in Libya on Thursday, ransacking the Venezuelan Embassy and setting part of it afire and torching cars in an escalation of the crisis over the United Nations' demand for Libya to hand over two suspects in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | ART PINE and DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writers
The United States is trying to engineer the first financial coup d'etat in modern times--the effort to unseat Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega by choking his regime economically. The effort hinges on a little-used provision in U.S. law that has enabled a shadow Panamanian government operating from a high-priced lawyer's office in Washington to win control of the Noriega government's dollar assets and foreign bank accounts.
NEWS
April 19, 1992 | From Associated Press
The first possible cracks appeared in the U.N. sanctions against Libya on Saturday, when Syria reportedly prepared to fly a jetliner to Tripoli in violation of the air embargo. Meanwhile, a lawyer for the two Libyan suspects in the 1988 bombing of Pan American Flight 103 suggested that they might be willing to stand trial in the United States or Britain--but only if they could be guaranteed a fair hearing.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Caterpillar Unit Is Fined for Libya Deal: The Treasury Department announced $137,500 in fines against Caterpillar Industrial Inc. in connection with the shipment of 298 trucks to Libya in violation of the U.S. embargo. The Treasury said the Mentor, Ohio, company acted as a middleman in the sale to Libya of 226 trucks from South Korea, 70 from Britain and two from Norway. Caterpillar Industrial, a division of Caterpillar Inc. of Peoria, Ill.
NEWS
July 29, 1988 | Washington Post
Eight men, six of them Libyans, were charged Thursday in Alexandria, Va., with using a McLean, Va.-based student group and a District of Columbia travel agency as fronts to violate the U.S. trade embargo on Libya, gather intelligence and "further Libyan foreign revolutionary policy" in the United States. A 40-count indictment handed up by a federal grand jury charged the defendants with conspiracy, money laundering and violations of U.S. trade sanctions against Libya.
WORLD
September 4, 2005 | Ken Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
As it struggles to combat Islamic terrorist networks, the Bush administration has quietly built an intelligence alliance with Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi, a onetime bitter enemy the U.S. had tried for years to isolate, topple or kill. Kadafi has helped the U.S. pursue Al Qaeda's network in North Africa by turning radicals over to neighboring pro-Western governments. He also has provided information to the CIA on Libyan nationals with alleged ties to international terrorists. In turn, the U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|