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BUSINESS
February 4, 1994 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Clinton announced the lifting of the Vietnam trade embargo Thursday, the U.S. business community applauded--ecstatically. Thirty-four American companies, large and small, have already obtained licenses from the Hanoi government to set up offices in Vietnam.
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OPINION
April 15, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Fleeing Cuba is harrowing and costly, whether it's done in a flimsy boat headed for U.S. shores or a speedboat headed for Mexico. Yasiel Puig, the gifted Dodgers outfielder, set off on the latter route, smuggled out by men who then threatened his life and held him hostage in a Mexican motel. A Florida man with a small-time criminal past helped get him out; in exchange, Puig promised to pay the man 20% of his lifetime earnings. Puig's difficult journey was the result of the longtime U.S. economic embargo on Cuba, which, among other things, makes it illegal for Major League Baseball to hire players directly from Cuba, a veritable incubator of baseball talent.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1997
Pope John Paul II will visit Cuba next month to establish a dialogue with the Cuban government and its people. I believe that given the powerful message that his visit provides, it will confirm that the United States and others have engaged in undermining what the rest of the world has supported--an end to the blockade. Several years ago, the United Nations took a vote and with the exception of Great Britain and the U.S., this diplomatic body voted to lift the embargo. I believe that the pope's visit will further demonstrate that Cuba should not be further penalized by this political roadblock.
OPINION
February 16, 2014 | The Times editorial board
The United States and Cuba have been locked in the coldest of relationships for more than half a century. But a new poll suggests that the American people think it's time to warm things up a bit. We agree. The poll, commissioned by the Washington-based Atlantic Council research group, found that 6 in 10 Americans favor normalizing diplomatic relations with Cuba. The numbers are stronger in Florida than in the nation as a whole, and support holds even among Latinos in that state, which is where the bulk of the Cuban expatriate community resides.
OPINION
February 3, 2013 | By Vanessa Garcia
Last month, Cuba opened its doors a little wider. President Raul Castro announced that Cuban citizens would no longer need to obtain notoriously hard to get exit permits to leave the country; just a passport. Many Cubans are understandably skeptical of Castro's action. No doubt some Cubans will still be denied passports, and there are still many restrictions on travel. Athletes, musicians and members of the military, for example, still have to obtain special permission from big brother (or, in this case, little brother, Raul)
OPINION
October 11, 2011 | By Yitzchok Adlerstein
As trade embargoes go, this one probably won't make it into the history books. It won't have much impact on the economy or create shortages of critical goods. But a decision by the Egyptian Ministry of Agriculture to ban all sales of palm fronds to Israel this year was, at the least, not very neighborly. Wednesday at sundown marks the beginning of the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, an autumn celebration of God's providence and bounty. Part of the celebration involves gathering four plants, including a date palm branch or lulav, which is used during a prayer and other parts of a religious service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1985
Reagan's trade embargo against Nicaragua serves as another example of our vain (in both senses of the word) attempt to make Central America over in our own image and keep it under our control. Accompanied by threatening U.S. military maneuvers in next-door Honduras, U.S. building of seven air bases along the Nicaragua-Honduras border, previous U.S. covert aid to the contras and the CIA-supervised mining of Nicaraguan ports, Reagan cannot forever fool Americans as to who the real aggressor in Central America is. The justification for the embargo?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1994
In 1975, the United States lost the military and political wars in Vietnam. On Feb. 3 she lost the moral war when President Clinton lifted the U.S. trade embargo against the Communist regime of Vietnam. In the end, it is fitting that a draft-dodging American President should make this ignominious loss complete and close a shameful chapter of American history. DONG T. DUONG MD, Newport Beach. Duong was a battalion surgeon with the Army of the Republic of South Vietnam. The lifting of the Vietnamese trade embargo was wrong; it was done more for corporate gain than for any humanitarian reason.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
The U.S. Commerce Department said it would allow Chinese textiles and apparel that have been embargoed at U.S. ports to be donated to survivors of Hurricane Katrina. The clothing has been barred from entry into the country since earlier this year under safeguards designed to protect U.S. textile makers from a flood of cheap Chinese imports. U.S. apparel importers that had purchased the goods from China will give up ownership, and U.S.
SPORTS
September 27, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Cuba's government has lifted its ban on professional sports, allowing athletes to sign contracts and compete for pay outside the island. The change will make it easier for Cubans to compete professionally in Europe and Asia, but it does not necessarily mean a new wave of Cuban baseball players will be landing in Major League Baseball. Professional sports in the United States are still bound by a 51-year-old embargo that bans nearly all business transactions between Americans and the Cuban government.
WORLD
May 27, 2013 | By Henry Chu and Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - Diplomatic pressure on Syrian President Bashar Assad escalated Monday, as a divided European Union agreed to relax a ban on weapons shipments to anti-Assad forces and U.S. Sen. John McCain met with insurgent commanders during a surprise visit to the country. Meanwhile, top U.S. and Russian diplomats met in Paris in a bid to solidify plans for a peace conference that both nations view as the only hope for a diplomatic solution to the Syrian crisis, which has already left tens of thousands of people dead and threatens to spark a regional conflagration.
WORLD
May 8, 2013 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - A bipartisan group of senators introduced legislation Wednesday that would sharply toughen U.S. economic sanctions on Iran despite administration calls for Congress to delay penalties that could disrupt diplomacy aimed at resolving the dispute over Iran's nuclear program. Advocates say the Senate proposal could, at least in theory, block Iran from accessing about one-third of the foreign exchange reserves it relies on to pay for government programs, to finance trade and to prop up its currency.
WORLD
March 6, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
An arms embargo on Somalia will be eased for a year, allowing the country's new government to buy some weapons to battle religious extremists, the U.N. Security Council said Wednesday. The Security Council resolution adopted Wednesday maintains the ban on surface-to-air missiles, higher-caliber guns, howitzers and mortars, anti-tank weapons and other heavy firepower, but allows other arms to be sold to Somali security forces. It bars those arms from being resold to anyone else. The Somali government is also required to inform a U.N. committee before any weapons or military equipment are delivered and provide details about the shipments.
OPINION
February 3, 2013 | By Vanessa Garcia
Last month, Cuba opened its doors a little wider. President Raul Castro announced that Cuban citizens would no longer need to obtain notoriously hard to get exit permits to leave the country; just a passport. Many Cubans are understandably skeptical of Castro's action. No doubt some Cubans will still be denied passports, and there are still many restrictions on travel. Athletes, musicians and members of the military, for example, still have to obtain special permission from big brother (or, in this case, little brother, Raul)
WORLD
July 2, 2012 | By Ramin Mostaghim, Los Angeles Times
TEHRAN - As a European Union oil embargo took effect, a defiant Iran said Sunday that it was beginning a new round of war games that would involve firing missiles at models of foreign air bases. The war games are an example of how Iranian leaders are projecting an image of strength at a time when the country's sanctions-battered economy is in a downward spiral. Iran also is facing the possibility of attack because of its nuclear program, and its major Arab ally, Syrian President Bashar Assad, is struggling to put down an armed rebellion.
WORLD
January 24, 2012 | By Henry Chu and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Europe slapped a boycott on Iranian oil Monday, signaling that the Islamic Republic's second-largest market is likely to dry up as part of a U.S.-led sanctions campaign that has already inflicted serious damage on Iran's economy and sharply increased tensions. The value of Iran's currency is falling dramatically, prices are rising and Iranians are stocking up on supplies in fear of worse to come. Iran, which receives an estimated 70% of its revenue from oil sales, has threatened to retaliate by choking off the flow of oil through the Strait of Hormuz at the southern end of the Persian Gulf.
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