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Embezzlement California

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BUSINESS
January 31, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Businessman Pleads Guilty in $3.78-Million Fraud: A Santa Barbara businessman pleaded guilty to fraud connected with the failure of two California title companies that he formerly headed, Insurance Commissioner Chuck Quackenbush announced. Devin Charles Park, 36, admitted to illegally converting to his own use some $3.13 million in escrow funds deposited in the companies, Trico Title Co. and Homestead Title Co., which were seized last summer by the state Insurance Department.
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BUSINESS
June 6, 1995 | From Associated Press
A Santa Barbara businessman was ordered Monday to pay $4 million and spend more than five years in jail for siphoning funds from two title insurance companies he managed that later failed. Devin Charles Park, 36, had pleaded guilty in January to federal charges of mail fraud, theft of government property and making a false statement to a financial institution. U.S. District Judge David Kenyon imposed the maximum sentence allowed under federal guidelines, 63 months. Trico Title Co.
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BUSINESS
June 6, 1995 | From Associated Press
A Santa Barbara businessman was ordered Monday to pay $4 million and spend more than five years in jail for siphoning funds from two title insurance companies he managed that later failed. Devin Charles Park, 36, had pleaded guilty in January to federal charges of mail fraud, theft of government property and making a false statement to a financial institution. U.S. District Judge David Kenyon imposed the maximum sentence allowed under federal guidelines, 63 months. Trico Title Co.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Businessman Pleads Guilty in $3.78-Million Fraud: A Santa Barbara businessman pleaded guilty to fraud connected with the failure of two California title companies that he formerly headed, Insurance Commissioner Chuck Quackenbush announced. Devin Charles Park, 36, admitted to illegally converting to his own use some $3.13 million in escrow funds deposited in the companies, Trico Title Co. and Homestead Title Co., which were seized last summer by the state Insurance Department.
NEWS
December 9, 1992 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing chorus of discontent confronted the Newport-Mesa school board Tuesday night as nearly 250 parents and teachers packed the auditorium to repeat their call for a change of leadership in the school district. Galvanized by the arrest last month of the school district's former top financial officer, Stephen A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1992 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing chorus of discontent confronted the Newport-Mesa school board Tuesday night, as nearly 250 parents and teachers packed the auditorium to repeat their call for a leadership change. "As taxpayers and parents of the children, we feel it is counterproductive and inappropriate for the board to be non-communicative and confrontational toward us," said Dan Vinke, a father of two who represented an informal coalition of about two dozen parents.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supt. John W. Nicoll, who has been under pressure to step down as head of the beleaguered Newport-Mesa Unified School District, announced his resignation Saturday, citing failing health. Nicoll, 71, has served for 21 years as the top administrator of the Newport-Mesa district, now reeling from the largest embezzlement in California education history. During his tenure, Nicoll hired and promoted Stephen A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1992 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supt. John W. Nicoll, who has been under pressure to step down as head of the beleaguered Newport-Mesa Unified School District, announced his resignation Saturday, citing old age and failing health. Nicoll, 71, has served for 21 years as the top administrator of the Newport-Mesa district, which is now reeling from what is believed to be the largest embezzlement in California education history. During his tenure, Nicoll hired and promoted Stephen A.
NEWS
February 1, 1993 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When John W. Nicoll first became superintendent of a unified school district in 1959, he was California's youngest. Today, he is about to retire as the state's oldest. Nicoll has been at the helm of the Newport-Mesa Unified School District for 22 years, during which it became known as one of California's most innovative and financially sound school districts. Now the Newport-Mesa district is known across the state for another financial reason. The district has suffered what is considered to be the largest school system embezzlement in California history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1994 | BOB ELSTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Mac Bernd moved his belongings into the superintendent's office last summer, the Newport-Mesa Unified School District was a house divided. A chorus of parents and teachers were unrelentingly criticizing school officials, who had failed to prevent the district's budget chief, Stephen A. Wagner, from stealing $4 million from various district accounts. In the fallout of that 1992 scandal, the largest embezzlement in California school history, Supt. John W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1992 | JODI WILGOREN
Jim de Boom, who resigned after just a week as president of the board of the Newport-Mesa Unified School District, stepped down because an angry parent vowed to publicize problems that had led to De Boom's ouster from the local YMCA's top job several years ago. The parent said De Boom's role in creating a significant debt at the YMCA shows that he would probably be a poor choice to head the school district in the wake of the largest school embezzlement in California history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1992 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They come from all corners of the school district, each with their own story of frustration or disappointment. Some bear battle scars from fighting administrators over the opening of new schools or the overcrowding in classrooms. Others are newcomers to school politics, just starting to ask why buildings look run-down and why children come home without textbooks. Now, outraged that they may be victims of the largest school embezzlement in California history, these parents in the Newport-Mesa Unified School District have come together to demand the ouster of top management and a full-scale investigation into how their public schools are run. The occasion for their sweeping demands is the recent arrest of the district's top financial officer, Stephen A. Wagner, for allegedly looting at least $3 million from district accounts.
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