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Embryos

NEWS
September 25, 1994 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baltimore nurse Janice Pearse recalls her long quest to become pregnant using in-vitro fertilization through a lens of pain, embarrassment, disappointment--and awe. The first time her eggs were mixed with her husband's sperm in a petri dish and the doctor told her that embryos had been formed was an exhilarating moment because "it's the closest to having a baby you've ever been."
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NATIONAL
October 30, 2002 | Aaron Zitner, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration has directed an advisory panel to study what protections are offered to embryos and fetuses in medical experiments, renewing criticism that federal officials may be using "backdoor" methods to provide a legal groundwork for curtailing abortion rights and embryonic stem-cell research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1989 | LANIE JONES, Times Staff Writer
Over the years, the young woman said softly, she had given her sister many presents--clothing, jewelry. But never before "a gift of life." Her older sister is infertile. But now, after an in vitro fertilization procedure that used the younger sister's ovarian eggs, the older woman is in her third month of pregnancy. And both sisters are ecstatic. Not only is this pregnancy a personal triumph for the Mission Viejo women, but according to several fertility experts around the country, it may have made medical history.
NEWS
October 22, 2001
A North Carolina State University graduate student has discovered well-preserved and incredibly detailed remains of a dinosaur embryo in an egg unearthed more than 30 years ago. The dinosaur is thought to be a Lophorhothan , a duck-billed dinosaur that lived in the area that is now Alabama. The egg was discovered by three high school students in 1970, but researchers did not know what it contained.
NEWS
July 12, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
For the first time in the United States, doctors transplanted nerve tissue from a human embryo into a paralyzed man in an attempt to slow the progression of spinal cord damage. The operation was performed at a Gainesville hospital on a 43-year-old Florida man suffering from a degenerative condition called syringomyelia. The disorder is characterized by expansion of a fluid-containing cavity within the damaged spinal cord.
NEWS
August 14, 1992 | Associated Press
A woman treated with fertility drugs is pregnant with a record number of 12 embryos, but chances are great that she will not be able to bring any to term, an Israeli doctor says. Dr. Jehoshua Dor of Tel Hashomer Hospital outside Tel Aviv said in an interview Wednesday that some of the embryos will have to be removed from the womb if the pregnancy is to succeed--but that the process risks damaging others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1995
The attorney for a couple alleging that doctors at UC Irvine's fertility clinic gave their embryos to other couples without their permission said Saturday that he would be filing seven lawsuits against the university on behalf of couples making similar allegations. Theodore S. Wentworth said the allegations in the lawsuits would resemble those made in June by Debbie and John Challender of Newport Beach. In that suit, which names the university, the fertility center and doctors Ricardo H.
NEWS
July 27, 1996 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Across Britain on Thursday, medical workers in the country's 73 licensed infertility clinics will for the first time be subjected to an unusual law requiring that unclaimed frozen human embryos be destroyed after five years. More than 3,000 of the embryos, each no larger than the dot at the end of this sentence, are expected to be thawed and "allowed to perish," as authorities put it.
HEALTH
July 30, 2001 | RICK WEISS, WASHINGTON POST
Gweneth and Jeff Berkowitz are going to choose their next baby. They will examine the candidate embryos they've made, one by one. They will submit each to the latest genetic screens. They will select only the best--and reject the rest. Gweneth, 30, and Jeff, 31, are not afraid to grab the reins from evolution or nature--not since the birth and death of their daughter, Logan, a few months ago. "You see this child and hold her, and that bond is created," Jeff Berkowitz said.
NEWS
October 27, 1993 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A growing furor over a doctor's efforts to split human embryos is the latest sign of an accelerating revolution in human conception. It is a field in which infertility specialists experiment, unregulated and often unnoticed, with the raw material of human life. They work at the edge of a medical frontier, never far from tabloid headlines or the limit of ethically acceptable research.
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