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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1995
The attorney for a couple alleging that doctors at UC Irvine's fertility clinic gave their embryos to other couples without their permission said Saturday that he would be filing seven lawsuits against the university on behalf of couples making similar allegations. Theodore S. Wentworth said the allegations in the lawsuits would resemble those made in June by Debbie and John Challender of Newport Beach. In that suit, which names the university, the fertility center and doctors Ricardo H.
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NEWS
July 27, 1996 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Across Britain on Thursday, medical workers in the country's 73 licensed infertility clinics will for the first time be subjected to an unusual law requiring that unclaimed frozen human embryos be destroyed after five years. More than 3,000 of the embryos, each no larger than the dot at the end of this sentence, are expected to be thawed and "allowed to perish," as authorities put it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC Irvine fertility specialist Dr. Ricardo H. Asch acknowledged Sunday that records show some of his patients' eggs and embryos were misused at the university clinic, but he declined to say whether he had "failed in his responsibility as doctor" in overseeing patient consent.
NEWS
August 19, 1994 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A federal panel is preparing to recommend that the National Institutes of Health--the world's largest biomedical research organization--end a 20-year moratorium on publicly funded research on human embryos created in laboratories. The 19 policy-makers, legal experts and medical specialists on the NIH advisory panel are not expected to make their findings public until next month.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Police were investigating the theft of $10,000 worth of frozen bull semen and embryos from Cal Poly Luis Obispo, a school spokesman said. Stolen was a container holding six one-ounce vials of semen and 25 embryos, all frozen by liquid nitrogen to 100 degrees below zero, spokesman Don McCaleb said. No arrests have been made and the dairy building burglary was not believed to be a prank, he said.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | From Associated Press
In an experiment believed to be the first of its kind, a researcher in Washington has cloned human embryos into identical twins or triplets, according to a published report. Dr. Jerry Hall of George Washington University Medical Center was trying to devise a method to create more embryos to implant when couples do not produce a sufficient number for in vitro fertilization, according to today's editions of the New York Times.
SCIENCE
January 11, 2008 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
Scientists reported Thursday that for the first time they have made human embryonic stem cells without destroying embryos, a development that the government's top stem cell official said would make the controversial research eligible for federal funding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1994 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one corner of a tiny laboratory at UCI Medical Center stand three large, temperature-controlled tanks holding an ethical dilemma for Dr. Ricardo Asch. Inside are thousands of frozen embryos, speck-size potential human beings formed by the merging of sperm and egg within a test tube. They were created to help the hospital's fertility clinic, through in-vitro fertilization, successfully impregnate women who otherwise would be childless.
NEWS
August 23, 2001 | ROBYN SAMUELS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It came in the mail again one day: the bill from the hospital for storing our frozen embryos. They can be kept indefinitely, as far as anyone knows, but there's really no point. Eventually they should be used or discarded. The first year we paid the annual fee with little discussion. Our girls were only 4 months old. We were nearly certain that two was plenty, but what if, God forbid, something happened to one or both of them?
NEWS
June 21, 2001 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As evidence mounted last year that embryo cells could be tweaked in ways that might cure disease, the American Heart Assn. decided to spend some of its own money to see whether the cells could ease heart disease. No less would be expected from an organization that exists largely to tame the nation's No. 1 killer. Then came a flood of protest letters, including one from the Roman Catholic archbishop of St. Louis.
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