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May 17, 2013 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: A few years ago I finished paying off my debt and now am in the very low-risk credit category. I have savings equal to about three months' worth of bills and am working to get that to six months' worth. I'm wondering, though, about an emergency that may require me to pay in cash (such as a major power outage that disables debit or credit card systems, or the more likely event that I forget the ATM or credit card at home). How much cash should a person have on hand? Is there a magic number?
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NATIONAL
April 27, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Justice Antonin Scalia, the Supreme Court's new champion of the 4th Amendment, is likely to play a crucial role Tuesday when the court hears this year's most important search case: whether the police may routinely examine the digital contents of a cellphone confiscated during an arrest. Civil libertarians say the stakes are high because arrests are so common - 13.1 million were made in 2010, according to the FBI - and smartphones hold so much private information. Under current law, officers may search a person under arrest, checking pockets and looking through a wallet or purse.
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BUSINESS
August 26, 2000 | Reuters
United Airlines, the world's largest airline, is downgrading the "operational emergencies" it declared at six airport locations to force mechanics to work overtime, the machinists union said. The union, the International Assn. of Machinists, said the decision to pull back on the mandatory overtime was made after discussions this week between the union and United.
WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali and Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan - The fatal shooting of three Americans in a charity hospital Thursday punctuated a dismal new trend that has emerged in the waning months of the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan: Just as many foreign civilians are being killed as troops. The brazen attack by a police officer at the CURE International hospital in Kabul, which serves 37,000 Afghans a year, shocked even this war-weary city and seemed likely to diminish the already dwindling population of foreigners working in the capital.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Federal regulators moved Thursday to expand the ability of people to send texts to 911 in emergencies, and are working on rules that would require wireless carriers to enable such messages by the end of the year. The Federal Communications Commission voted unanimously that texting to 911 should be widespread, and to begin soliciting comments from the public and industry about whether a Dec. 31 deadline for establishing the capability would be feasible. "Access to 911 just simply has to keep pace with technological change," said FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2013 | By Jack Leonard and Joe Mozingo
Los Angeles fire paramedics and police had relatively little to do during Sunday's CicLAvia, as authorities reported no major medical emergencies or arrests at the city's seventh car-free event. One cyclist was reportedly struck by a vehicle about 2:15 p.m. along Wilshire Boulevard near Lorraine Boulevard in the city's Mid-Wilshire neighborhood but was adamant that he did not require medical attention, despite an initial complaint of back discomfort, city fire spokesman Brian Humphrey said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1989 | STEPHEN BRAUN, Times Staff Writer
It was the Cat Lady again. The night before, the amiable, elderly caller had rung up the Los Angeles Police Department's 911 emergency command center five times. Monday morning, she called the Police Department twice more, as she has done almost daily for 18 years, to ramble on about her "kittens." "Those cats sure do get around," sighed Lisa Turner, a police operator, before gently persuading the woman to hang up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1994
For the duration of the strike, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority has established emergency service on seven of the San Fernando Valley's busiest routes. There are fewer buses on those lines, however, and MTA officials cautioned passengers to expect to wait twice as long as usual between buses. For example, they said, if a bus normally reaches a particular stop every 20 minutes, buses on the emergency lines will probably arrive up to 40 minutes apart.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | Associated Press
A state of emergency declared after ethnic violence flared in the Central Asian republic of Kirghizia in June has been lifted, Tass reported Wednesday. The official Soviet news agency said the state of emergency "accomplished its task" and conditions in the republic had stabilized. The clampdown was imposed on June 7, along with a curfew in the capital of Frunze and the town of Osh, about 200 miles to the south, where fighting between ethnic Kirghiz and Uzbeks claimed more than 210 lives.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Big Wall Street investment companies are pulling back slightly on their borrowing from the Federal Reserve's emergency lending program. A central bank report Thursday said that they averaged $32.6 billion in daily borrowing over the last week. That compares with $38.1 billion in the previous week and $32.9 billion before that. "Conditions in this particular part of the financial markets are easing up somewhat," said T.J. Marta, a fixed-income strategist at RBC Capital Markets who viewed the pullback as a positive sign.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Matjames Metson's Silver Lake studio is in a 1930s Art Deco duplex perched atop a steep flight of aging, concrete stairs overlooking a cul-de-sac, which overlooks a hillside, which overlooks a bustling intersection that, from above, appears to be teeming with tiny toy cars and action-figure people. Inside, Metson's dusty, sunlit living room-turned-art studio is also full of tiny treasures. The assemblage artist builds intricate, architectural sculptures, wall hangings and furniture made from his abundant stash of objects, most of which he finds at estate sales.
WORLD
April 13, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Paul Richter
MOSCOW - Vowing that the Russian takeover of Crimea would not be repeated elsewhere in the east of his country, Ukraine's interim president gave separatists until Monday to lay down their arms and surrender government buildings they have seized or face a crackdown by military forces. Those separatists who don't fire on security forces and who surrender their weapons will not be prosecuted, President Oleksandr Turchynov said Sunday. "The Council of National Security and Defense has decided to carry out a large-scale anti-terrorist operation with the use of armed forces of Ukraine," Turchynov said in a televised address Sunday afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
ORLAND, Calif. - Investigators found no physical evidence that a FedEx freight truck was on fire before it collided with a charter tour bus in Northern California last week, killing 10 people, authorities said Sunday. "Our fire expert reviewed the median and the highway, and found no physical evidence of fire before the impact," said Mark Rosekind, a member of the National Transportation Safety Board. Fire engulfed both vehicles after the crash. Those findings contradict the eyewitness accounts of a couple whose Nissan Altima was sideswiped by the truck.
HOME & GARDEN
April 12, 2014 | Anne Colby
Rustic Canyon's sylvan beauty and funky charm cast its spell on Jill Soffer a dozen years ago. She liked the neighborhood's relaxed environment and abundance of sycamore trees and purchased a home there in 2002. "There's all this green around. It's not too manicured," Soffer said appreciatively. "People are easygoing, everything is a little overgrown, and the creek in the middle of everything is a little shaggy. You can hear the frogs at night. " She planned to renovate her 1920s three-bedroom house, but hadn't yet when she met and then in 2008 married Greg Adler, who had two young sons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | By Paige St. John
FRENCH CAMP, Calif. - California's $840-million medical prison - the largest in the nation - was built to provide care to more than 1,800 inmates. When fully operational, it was supposed to help the state's prison system emerge from a decade of federal oversight brought on by the persistent neglect and poor medical treatment of inmates. But since opening in July, the state-of-the-art California Health Care Facility has been beset by waste, mismanagement and miscommunication between the prison and medical staffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Like many Americans last week, I greeted the news of David Letterman's retirement in 2015 with regretful acceptance. I love him with a love deep and true, but the man is pushing 70, and at least we could look forward to another year of his fine, cantankerous self. But now I cannot wait for him to go. From the moment it was announced Thursday that Stephen Colbert would be taking over "Late Show," I was ready to box up Letterman's stuff and move it myself. Because I have to know: Will Colbert change the nature of late night or will the bravest comedian on television just sell out?
NATIONAL
August 6, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. Brian Schweitzer declared a state of emergency amid wildfires, including one northeast of Missoula that has crept to within a mile of several homes and destroyed at least one. Higher humidity and clouds were helping firefighters contain that nearly 28-square-mile blaze, which began Friday and rapidly grew, leading to evacuation orders for about 200 homes. A fire spokesman estimated containment at zero percent, "only because there isn't a lower number."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Garrett Therolf
A new report from the blue ribbon commission on Los Angeles County's safety net for abused and neglected children levels stinging criticism at the Board of Supervisors for what it calls a sluggish approach to reform, and declares that the system has fallen into a "state of emergency. " "Nothing short of a complete rethinking about how the county ensures safe and supportive care for abused and at-risk children will lead to the seamless and comprehensive child welfare system that the county has needed for decades," the 10-member commission wrote in a report it voted to approve Thursday afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Garrett Therolf
A new report from the blue-ribbon commission on Los Angeles County's safety net for abused and neglected children levels stinging criticism at the Board of Supervisors for a sluggish approach to reform, and declares that the system has fallen into a "state of emergency. " "Nothing short of a complete rethinking about how the county ensures safe and supportive care for abused and at-risk children will lead to the seamless and comprehensive child welfare system that the county has needed for decades," the commissioners wrote in a draft report expected to be approved in a vote Thursday afternoon.  The members of the commission said the elected Board of Supervisors has responded too slowly and failed to identify a coordinated mission and clear, measurable goals for the child-protection system.  The commission released its first set of recommendations in December.
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