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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to ease the burden on the city's overloaded 911 system, Los Angeles officials plan to build a $10-million system to handle nonemergency calls. But switching to an all-purpose 311 system is so complicated that planners say it will take more than a year to create even a bare-bones network. Wiring and staffing the new network is only part of the challenge.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2001 | SUE FOX
Callers who reach out and touch City Hall these days are likely to find themselves groping through a bureaucratic thicket. Take the recent experience of Jason Greenwald, a 29-year-old writer and political consultant. He was cruising down La Cienega Boulevard, past the Beverly Center shopping mall, when he saw two delivery trucks parked in the right lane, hampering traffic. So he grabbed his cell phone and dialed 911.
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NEWS
January 19, 1992
In a bomb shelter under City Hall East, a 911 switchboard operator took an emergency call that underscored the importance of having enough patrol cars on the streets of Los Angeles. A young man in the Harbor area was reported wounded in the leg, the victim of a drive-by shooting. It was 11:20 p.m. on a recent Friday night. The operator issued a high priority "hotshot" call for any available unit to respond immediately. But there were no available units.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to ease the burden on the city's overloaded 911 system, Los Angeles officials plan to build a $10-million telephone answering system to handle nonemergency calls. But switching to a 311 system--envisioned as an all-purpose service to help unclog 911 lines--is so complicated that planners say it will take more than a year to set up even the bare bones. Wiring and staffing the new network is only part of the challenge.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than half an hour after Monday's earthquake tore through Los Angeles at 4:31 a.m., a cadre of emergency workers, their skills honed by the city's all too regular stream of catastrophes, descended on a subterranean City Hall bunker to manage the crisis. They would spend the next 24 hours frantically sifting through thousands of calls from law enforcement agencies in the field.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2001 | SUE FOX
Callers who reach out and touch City Hall these days are likely to find themselves groping through a bureaucratic thicket. Take the recent experience of Jason Greenwald, a 29-year-old writer and political consultant. He was cruising down La Cienega Boulevard, past the Beverly Center shopping mall, when he saw two delivery trucks parked in the right lane, hampering traffic. So he grabbed his cell phone and dialed 911.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine years after Los Angeles voters approved $235 million in bonds to upgrade the city's outdated 911 system, the new emergency dispatch centers are still under construction and more than 200,000 calls a year are going unanswered. That's the worst tally for abandoned calls that the 911 system has logged in five years, according to Los Angeles Police Department records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1994 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles riots, the Northridge earthquake, last fall's wildfires--each of them prompted city officials to declare a local state of emergency. If Hollywood Councilwoman Jackie Goldberg has her way, the AIDS epidemic will prompt the same response. Concerned about police citations issued in recent months to activists who are distributing clean needles to drug users on Hollywood streets, Goldberg on Friday urged Mayor Richard Riordan to declare a local public health emergency.
NEWS
September 20, 2000 | RICH CONNELL and ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three Los Angeles Fire Department dispatchers seriously bungled calls for help from a man who said his fiancee had passed out and was bleeding, interviews and records show. The incident, in which the woman died, occurred last month after officials vowed to curb such mistakes. Although paramedics were stationed down the street, it took two phone calls and nearly 20 minutes before they arrived at the Tujunga home of Robert Shaw and Elaina Marie Vescio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1999 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Los Angeles has been awarded a federal grant of about $900,000 to implement a 311 phone system aimed at handling nonemergency calls and easing the burden on the 911 emergency phone lines, authorities confirmed Thursday. Officials from the U.S. Department of Justice, including U.S. Associate Atty. Gen. Raymond C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to ease the burden on the city's overloaded 911 system, Los Angeles officials plan to build a $10-million system to handle nonemergency calls. But switching to an all-purpose 311 system is so complicated that planners say it will take more than a year to create even a bare-bones network. Wiring and staffing the new network is only part of the challenge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine years after Los Angeles voters approved $235 million in bonds to upgrade the city's outdated 911 system, the new emergency dispatch centers are still under construction and more than 200,000 calls a year are going unanswered. That's the worst tally for abandoned calls that the 911 system has logged in five years, according to Los Angeles Police Department records.
NEWS
September 20, 2000 | RICH CONNELL and ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three Los Angeles Fire Department dispatchers seriously bungled calls for help from a man who said his fiancee had passed out and was bleeding, interviews and records show. The incident, in which the woman died, occurred last month after officials vowed to curb such mistakes. Although paramedics were stationed down the street, it took two phone calls and nearly 20 minutes before they arrived at the Tujunga home of Robert Shaw and Elaina Marie Vescio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1999 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Los Angeles has been awarded a federal grant of about $900,000 to implement a 311 phone system aimed at handling nonemergency calls and easing the burden on the 911 emergency phone lines, authorities confirmed Thursday. Officials from the U.S. Department of Justice, including U.S. Associate Atty. Gen. Raymond C.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 180,000 calls to Los Angeles' overburdened emergency 911 system went unanswered last year and new phones installed to handle the crush of calls continue to sit idle because no operators have been hired to staff them, according to an LAPD report released Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1994 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles riots, the Northridge earthquake, last fall's wildfires--each of them prompted city officials to declare a local state of emergency. If Hollywood Councilwoman Jackie Goldberg has her way, the AIDS epidemic will prompt the same response. Concerned about police citations issued in recent months to activists who are distributing clean needles to drug users on Hollywood streets, Goldberg on Friday urged Mayor Richard Riordan to declare a local public health emergency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to ease the burden on the city's overloaded 911 system, Los Angeles officials plan to build a $10-million telephone answering system to handle nonemergency calls. But switching to a 311 system--envisioned as an all-purpose service to help unclog 911 lines--is so complicated that planners say it will take more than a year to set up even the bare bones. Wiring and staffing the new network is only part of the challenge.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 180,000 calls to Los Angeles' overburdened emergency 911 system went unanswered last year and new phones installed to handle the crush of calls continue to sit idle because no operators have been hired to staff them, according to an LAPD report released Wednesday.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than half an hour after Monday's earthquake tore through Los Angeles at 4:31 a.m., a cadre of emergency workers, their skills honed by the city's all too regular stream of catastrophes, descended on a subterranean City Hall bunker to manage the crisis. They would spend the next 24 hours frantically sifting through thousands of calls from law enforcement agencies in the field.
NEWS
January 19, 1992
In a bomb shelter under City Hall East, a 911 switchboard operator took an emergency call that underscored the importance of having enough patrol cars on the streets of Los Angeles. A young man in the Harbor area was reported wounded in the leg, the victim of a drive-by shooting. It was 11:20 p.m. on a recent Friday night. The operator issued a high priority "hotshot" call for any available unit to respond immediately. But there were no available units.
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