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NEWS
October 19, 1993 | From The Washington Post
The state of emergency that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin imposed during a hard-line rebellion two weeks ago ended Monday, but police officials said they intend to continue tough measures to combat crime and expel from Moscow anyone without a proper residency permit. Russian television Monday night showed military units packing up armored personnel carriers in preparation for beginning their withdrawal from the city. Yeltsin imposed the state of emergency and a curfew Oct.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is The Times' art critic
"A Suprematist Story of Two Squares in Six Constructions" is an extraordinary book for children, designed by the great Russian artist El (Lazar) Lissitzky (1890-1941). In an abstract narrative, a red square and a black square are protagonists whose drama is played out in an infinite spatial void of white. The diminutive book, published in 1922, is a landmark of avant-garde graphic design.
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NEWS
November 3, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a rare display of common political resolve, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and increasingly hostile lawmakers joined forces Monday to impose a state of emergency to halt the first outbreak of ethnic warfare in the independent Russian Federation. Under Yeltsin's monthlong emergency decree, which took effect immediately, strikes and political actions were banned in troubled North Ossetia and the Ingush Republic. Deputy Prime Minister Georgy S.
NEWS
January 4, 1996 | Associated Press
An erupting volcano threw ashes and steam miles into the air Wednesday in Russia's Far East, and scientists said a new volcano is being born just south of the first on the Kamchatka peninsula. Kamchatka's most active volcano, Karymsky, began erupting Monday after being quiet since 1982, the Itar-Tass news agency reported. On Wednesday, the column of ashes over the volcano reached 3.7 miles into the air, and steam and boiling water shot up as high as 1.2 miles, Itar-Tass said.
NEWS
October 10, 1993 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin on Saturday extended a state of emergency and curfew in this city for another week, despite nearly daily assurances from authorities that civil conditions remain calm. Yeltsin also strengthened his hold on local and municipal administrations across Russia by ordering local soviets, or councils, to disband.
NEWS
January 4, 1996 | Associated Press
An erupting volcano threw ashes and steam miles into the air Wednesday in Russia's Far East, and scientists said a new volcano is being born just south of the first on the Kamchatka peninsula. Kamchatka's most active volcano, Karymsky, began erupting Monday after being quiet since 1982, the Itar-Tass news agency reported. On Wednesday, the column of ashes over the volcano reached 3.7 miles into the air, and steam and boiling water shot up as high as 1.2 miles, Itar-Tass said.
NEWS
December 16, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a country where the president can disband parliament and rule by decree, it would seem to make little difference which parties gain control of the impotent State Duma. But Sunday's elections to the 450-seat lower house provide a barometer for gauging who might emerge as Russia's next leader. With presidential elections only six months away, the parliamentary vote is a de facto primary and will give top contenders a high-profile podium for that race.
NEWS
January 7, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His tired, bespectacled face and shy, reasoning voice seem out of place in the brutal battle for Chechnya. But three weeks ago, 64-year-old lawmaker Sergei A. Kovalev traveled there to show his opposition to the Russian assault on the tiny, secessionist republic and stayed to chronicle the daily suffering inflicted by Russian bombs, artillery and tank fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is The Times' art critic
"A Suprematist Story of Two Squares in Six Constructions" is an extraordinary book for children, designed by the great Russian artist El (Lazar) Lissitzky (1890-1941). In an abstract narrative, a red square and a black square are protagonists whose drama is played out in an infinite spatial void of white. The diminutive book, published in 1922, is a landmark of avant-garde graphic design.
NEWS
October 3, 2000 | Associated Press
Navies from the United States, Japan, South Korea and Singapore on Monday began the first combined submarine rescue exercise in the Pacific. The 13-day Exercise Pacific Reach 2000 involves 600 people, four ships, four submarines and three sophisticated underwater craft that can rescue personnel from submarines in distress.
NEWS
December 16, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a country where the president can disband parliament and rule by decree, it would seem to make little difference which parties gain control of the impotent State Duma. But Sunday's elections to the 450-seat lower house provide a barometer for gauging who might emerge as Russia's next leader. With presidential elections only six months away, the parliamentary vote is a de facto primary and will give top contenders a high-profile podium for that race.
NEWS
January 7, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His tired, bespectacled face and shy, reasoning voice seem out of place in the brutal battle for Chechnya. But three weeks ago, 64-year-old lawmaker Sergei A. Kovalev traveled there to show his opposition to the Russian assault on the tiny, secessionist republic and stayed to chronicle the daily suffering inflicted by Russian bombs, artillery and tank fire.
NEWS
October 19, 1993 | From The Washington Post
The state of emergency that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin imposed during a hard-line rebellion two weeks ago ended Monday, but police officials said they intend to continue tough measures to combat crime and expel from Moscow anyone without a proper residency permit. Russian television Monday night showed military units packing up armored personnel carriers in preparation for beginning their withdrawal from the city. Yeltsin imposed the state of emergency and a curfew Oct.
NEWS
October 10, 1993 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin on Saturday extended a state of emergency and curfew in this city for another week, despite nearly daily assurances from authorities that civil conditions remain calm. Yeltsin also strengthened his hold on local and municipal administrations across Russia by ordering local soviets, or councils, to disband.
NEWS
November 3, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a rare display of common political resolve, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and increasingly hostile lawmakers joined forces Monday to impose a state of emergency to halt the first outbreak of ethnic warfare in the independent Russian Federation. Under Yeltsin's monthlong emergency decree, which took effect immediately, strikes and political actions were banned in troubled North Ossetia and the Ingush Republic. Deputy Prime Minister Georgy S.
NEWS
October 26, 1992 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lithuanians ventured from their unheated homes into cold, rainy streets Sunday to vote in their country's first post-Soviet parliamentary elections, which pit conservative former Communists against anti-Russia nationalists. Results were not available by late Sunday, but election officials said at least 70% of eligible citizens cast ballots.
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