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Emergency Medical Care Los Angeles County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1992 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The signs for Robert Martinez were not good when he arrived at the hospital four months ago. They rarely are when a body is stripped almost completely of the familiar insulating layer called skin. With more than 80% of his body burned in a refinery steam explosion and his lungs horribly damaged by contaminants from the blast, Martinez could breathe only with the aid of a ventilator as he lay comatose in his specially equipped bed at Torrance Memorial Medical Center.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2001 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County supervisors thought the dangerous overcrowding of County-USC Medical Center's psychiatric emergency room was one problem that could be quickly fixed. In response to reports by The Times and grand jury, the board two months ago gave its health department two weeks to devise a plan to open up 39 beds in another county hospital to accommodate the overflow.
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NEWS
June 26, 2001 | TED ROHRLICH and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was a lethal problem with a simple solution: Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center often couldn't provide dialysis to critically ill patients because specially trained nurses didn't work nights or Sundays. But the problem wasn't fixed until three patients in the last 10 months died after prolonged waits, according to doctors and medical records. Numerous others were endangered, saved only by stabilizing medications or transfer to smaller hospitals with round-the-clock treatment.
NEWS
June 26, 2001 | TED ROHRLICH and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was a lethal problem with a simple solution: Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center often couldn't provide dialysis to critically ill patients because specially trained nurses didn't work nights or Sundays. But the problem wasn't fixed until three patients in the last 10 months died after prolonged waits, according to doctors and medical records. Numerous others were endangered, saved only by stabilizing medications or transfer to smaller hospitals with round-the-clock treatment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1993 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, the emergency medical system in the northern South Bay was on the verge of collapse. Centinela Hospital Medical Center in Inglewood had announced it would shut its emergency room to patients in 911 ambulances because of huge losses from treating patients unable to pay their bills. Like toppling dominoes, hospitals in Hawthorne and Gardena threatened to follow suit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1989 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL and LANIE JONES, Times Staff Writers
When the Los Angeles County trauma system was set up in 1983, private hospitals battled hard and even sued to be included in the prestigious network, regarded as the crown jewel of the county's emergency services program. This month, the 10th trauma center of the original 23 permanently bowed out of the system. On busy nights, half a dozen of the remaining ones are full and temporarily closed.
NEWS
February 11, 1995 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rate of trauma-related deaths at the County-USC Medical Center, which operates the busiest emergency rooms in the nation, has dropped about 18% since the development of a new emergency medical program in 1991, according to a study released Friday.
NEWS
January 30, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, Times Staff Writer
The family of Luz Hermengildo, an 83-year-old woman with a history of diabetes and hypertension, discovered her lying unconscious on the floor of her East Los Angeles apartment at 6:25 Friday night.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The network of hospitals in Los Angeles County that provides emergency trauma care to 16,000 patients annually is once again in critical condition, with some of the 13 centers saying that their survival is threatened. The private hospitals that treat victims of freeway accidents and gunshots and handle other emergencies face a serious shortage of money at a time when neither private insurance companies nor governments are eager to pay for an expensive--although vital--level of medical care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1997
Responding to the case of a South Los Angeles man who died in a hospital after his gunshot wound went untreated for six hours, county Supervisor Yvonne Brathwaite Burke on Tuesday called for a probe of staffing levels at all county hospitals to determine if the facilities have enough doctors. The Board of Supervisors agreed to put Burke's motion on the agenda for their meeting next week, saying they could not vote on it Tuesday because it had not been publicly posted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county's Emergency Medical Services Commission and county supervisors called on the state Legislature on Monday to convene a special session to approve more funds for Los Angeles County's ailing trauma network. The request came at a hearing on the dwindling resources available to the county's 13 trauma centers, which have lost 50% of their state funding this year alone.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The network of hospitals in Los Angeles County that provides emergency trauma care to 16,000 patients annually is once again in critical condition, with some of the 13 centers saying that their survival is threatened. The private hospitals that treat victims of freeway accidents and gunshots and handle other emergencies face a serious shortage of money at a time when neither private insurance companies nor governments are eager to pay for an expensive--although vital--level of medical care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2000 | JOE MATHEWS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The operating room where Dr. Guy Lemire saved so many lost causes was disappearing all around him. The heart-lung machine had been taken across town. The electronic instruments and body warming equipment had been stripped for use elsewhere. Now Long Beach Community Medical Center, the hospital to which he had devoted the last quarter of a century of his life, was closing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2000 | JOE MATHEWS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emergency medical response from San Pedro to Seal Beach will be "negatively impacted" if Long Beach Community Medical Center closes as scheduled in October, the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services has found. That finding, part of a 157-page report to be presented to the Board of Supervisors next week, does not have the force of law and cannot stop the closure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1998 | JASON TAKENOUCHI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Owners of Los Robles Regional Medical Center in Thousand Oaks have announced plans to partly reopen Westlake Medical Center on Dec. 1 as an urgent-care facility. The move, which would strengthen hospital giant Columbia/HCA's hold on the regional market, was generally welcomed by local residents. But it left several unanswered questions about the facility's future. "I'm pleased they're going to reopen it," said Patricia Croner, a former member of the Westlake hospital's community advisory board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1998
Patients who are treated by Fire Department paramedics at an accident or injury scene and then transferred by ambulance to the hospital will have to pay a flat $23 medical supplies fee. Previously, hospitals restocked the Fire Department's supplies in kind and then charged the patients for the cost, said Capt. Raleigh Harris, the department's paramedic coordinator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1996 | FRANK MANNING
Fearing that the planned closure of Westlake Medical Center will leave residents without emergency medical services, the Westlake Village City Council will meet tonight to discuss contingency plans. Part of a special strategy session to help the council establish goals for the coming year, the meeting will also consider such topics as the development of a long-range library services plan and crime reduction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emergency ambulance fees would increase substantially if the Los Angeles City Council passes a plan aimed at recovering more of the cost of medical services. The higher fees--for everything from basic life support to traction splints--were proposed after a recent study found that the city charges less than the county for the same services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1998 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city Fire Department helicopter that crashed, killing 11-year-old Norma Vides and three rescue workers, was part of a countywide emergency system that relies on speed to ferry critically injured children for treatment at one of nine pediatric trauma centers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1998 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city Fire Department helicopter that crashed Monday, killing 11-year-old Norma Vides-Anaya and three rescue workers, was part of a countywide emergency system that requires critically injured children in the San Fernando, east San Gabriel and Antelope valleys to be taken by helicopter to distant trauma centers.
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