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Emergency Medical Care Orange County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1990 | KEVIN JOHNSON
A medical task force has proposed a series of measures to provide adequate health care to the poor in what emergency doctors and nurses have described as an endangered system of local emergency care. "We think the situation is becoming so dire that it has become necessary to trample on some toes," said Dr. Robert Hook after releasing a report Wednesday by the Society of Orange County Emergency Physicians and the Orange County Emergency Nurses Assn.
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NEWS
September 8, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The network of hospitals in Los Angeles County that provides emergency trauma care to 16,000 patients annually is once again in critical condition, with some of the 13 centers saying that their survival is threatened. The private hospitals that treat victims of freeway accidents and gunshots and handle other emergencies face a serious shortage of money at a time when neither private insurance companies nor governments are eager to pay for an expensive--although vital--level of medical care.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1991 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took a few seconds for 911 emergency telephone operator Ron Adkins to realize that it was a "hot call." Jonathan Lopez, 6, was on the line, explaining to Adkins in a calm but forceful manner that his grandmother was lying on the floor. "Is Grandma able to talk?" Adkins asked in an even, practiced tone. "Uh-uh," the boy responded. "She can't talk right now because she is hurting. . . . I think she's hurting everywhere."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1999 | Judy Silber, (714) 966-5988
In a few weeks, Anaheim residents will no longer have automatic coverage for paramedic services unless they specifically request the insurance. Until now, most residents in Anaheim have paid an extra $3 on their monthly utility bills for the paramedic insurance coverage. Unless residents said that they didn't want the coverage, the charge showed up automatically on their utility bills. But beginning Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1992 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Humana Hospital-Westminster will close Sunday, raising concerns about the diminished availability of emergency care in the city, which will be left without a hospital within its boundaries. The hospital, which has provided traditional services for 35 years, is being sold to Vencor Inc. and will be converted into a facility for critical care patients referred from other county hospitals who need to be kept on ventilators. The deal is expected to close escrow Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1990 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials at Santa Ana Hospital Medical Center said Tuesday that they will close its 24-hour emergency room in November and use the space to expand its obstetrics department. The closure is not considered a significant blow to the county's emergency medical system because the medical center does not receive paramedic patients, said Betty O'Rouke from county emergency medical services. The county has 30 hospitals in the emergency medical system.
NEWS
November 24, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY and JEFF BRAZIL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Julio Cano, the 12-year-old boy whose parents said they delayed seeking medical treatment because they were afraid of being deported, had acute leukemia, Orange County coroner's officials revealed Wednesday. Law enforcement sources working on the case said preliminary tests indicated that his body, in a weakened state because of the leukemia, may have been wracked with a bacterial infection that led to heart failure Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1989 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL and LANIE JONES, Times Staff Writers
When the Los Angeles County trauma system was set up in 1983, private hospitals battled hard and even sued to be included in the prestigious network, regarded as the crown jewel of the county's emergency services program. This month, the 10th trauma center of the original 23 permanently bowed out of the system. On busy nights, half a dozen of the remaining ones are full and temporarily closed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that the county cannot guarantee continued support in the future, the Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to allocate $3 million for indigent medical services to help out UCI Medical Center. The allocation was met with gratitude by officials of the University of California system, who had threatened to close down the medical center in Orange because it is sinking financially as it provides care for more than half of the indigent patients in the county.
NEWS
April 20, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two former physicians who worked in Orange County's premier trauma center, at UC Irvine Medical Center, say they recently quit after years of service because conditions had deteriorated so much they feared they could not ensure an acceptable level of patient care. A third physician, who took over as acting director of the center after her colleagues left, just gave notice she will leave next month for another job. Though the reasons for Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1999 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The emergency health care needs of poor, uninsured Orange County residents are not being met by the county's underfunded Medical Services for Indigents program, according to a grand jury report released Friday. "If one is ill and indigent in Orange County, there are ways to obtain medical care; but frequently the efforts needed to find the care, complete the forms and qualify turn away all but the most determined," the report stated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1998 | Kathleen Haney, (714) 965-7172
Instead of cutting off emergency services to Sunset Beach as proposed by Huntington Councilman Dave Sullivan, the Huntington Beach City Council voted earlier this week to negotiate with the Orange County Fire Authority for financial reimbursement or more services from the community to balance the scales. Since 1973, Huntington Beach has been shouldering the cost of emergency calls it makes to Sunset Beach even though it charges its own residents for emergency calls within city limits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1998 | Harrison Sheppard, (714) 966-5977
City officials are relieved that Huntington Beach is not pulling out of a paramedic agreement with the county, which would have meant diverting county paramedics stationed in Seal Beach to handle Sunset Beach calls. But they are wary of a plan by Huntington Beach Councilman Dave Sullivan to charge Sunset Beach residents when they receive Huntington ambulance service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1998 | CHRIS CEBALLOS
In response to the explosive population growth of south Orange County, a cornerstone was presented Tuesday for a new emergency medical service center at Saddleback Memorial Medical Center. The $15-million Meiklejohn Critical Care Pavilion, scheduled for construction next year, is still $1.8 million short of funding. Designed in 1974 to handle 1,500 patients per month, the current emergency room handles about 2,000 people each month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1998 | DEBRA CANO
The city will continue using Emergency Ambulance Service, which has been responding to calls for help locally since 1994. The City Council recently approved a new contract with Emergency Ambulance, effective today until July 1, 2001. The Orange County Fire Authority, which provides fire and paramedic services to the city under contract, administered the proposal process for the ambulance service. Fire Authority officials also reviewed the proposals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1998 | JEAN O. PASCO
The basic rate for using ambulance service in the county's unincorporated areas will increase from $296 to $314, effective July 1. County supervisors approved an across-the-board 6% rate increase for all ambulance services, including mileage, oxygen, standby charges and medical supplies. The board said rates for the county's seven ambulance companies hadn't been raised since 1994. The increase corresponds to the rise in the Consumer Price Index.
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paramedic and ambulance services for 1.1 million Orange County residents are undergoing a quiet but profound transformation that firefighters say will cut emergency response time by a minute and provide those in need with better care. Already, the Orange County Fire Authority has revamped its emergency medical system, moving paramedics from vans to fire engines, where they can more quickly reach victims.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The network of hospitals in Los Angeles County that provides emergency trauma care to 16,000 patients annually is once again in critical condition, with some of the 13 centers saying that their survival is threatened. The private hospitals that treat victims of freeway accidents and gunshots and handle other emergencies face a serious shortage of money at a time when neither private insurance companies nor governments are eager to pay for an expensive--although vital--level of medical care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Attorneys for several Orange County cities and an agency representing 19 others are scrambling to respond to a recent landmark state Supreme Court ruling limiting the right of cities to provide public ambulance service. The state's high court ruled June 30 in a case originally involving San Bernardino County that if a city did not already provide ambulance service before June 1980, it could not get into the business without county approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD
The California Supreme Court on Monday restricted the ability of local governments to take over ambulance service in a ruling that could have implications in Orange County. The court ruled that municipal fire departments that did not provide ambulance service in 1980 cannot get into the business unless they win approval from their county Board of Supervisors. The Orange County Fire Authority is now attempting to assume control of its ambulance service, which is now provided by private companies.
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