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Emergency Medical Care

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2007 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
In the emergency room at Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Hospital, Edith Isabel Rodriguez was seen as a complainer. "Thanks a lot, officers," an emergency room nurse told Los Angeles County police who brought in Rodriguez early May 9 after finding her in front of the Willowbrook hospital yelling for help. "This is her third time here." The 43-year-old mother of three had been released from the emergency room hours earlier, her third visit in three days for abdominal pain.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday unanimously approved raising certain criminal fines to help pay for trauma centers and emergency care across the county. The move, authorized by state legislation last fall, will levy an additional $2 for every $10 in some criminal penalties collected. Set to expire in 2009, it is expected to raise about $33.3 million for indigents' emergency care, help fund new and existing trauma centers, and pay for 26 new health department positions.
WORLD
December 12, 2006 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
The shooting begins as we clear the checkpoint. Ibrahim pulls over, waiting for the gunfire to stop. Up ahead, a car has been pushed off the road, the driver abducted moments earlier. "Do you want to turn around?" asks Said, the interpreter who's going with me to Baghdad's busiest emergency room. Earlier, attackers fired mortar shells into a Sunni Arab neighborhood south of us. Ambulances, taxis and private cars are now speeding to Yarmouk Hospital, carrying bloodied victims.
HEALTH
October 16, 2006 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
IT'S the bottom of the sixth inning and the score is tied. So what if those chest pains are getting more intense -- a trip to the emergency room is going to have to wait. That's how a lot of men think, new research suggests. Dr. David A. Jerrard of the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore studied emergency room patterns at his hospital during and after 796 televised sporting events.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2006 | Sam Quinones, Times Staff Writer
Upset over the planned closure of an emergency room in their city, Inglewood residents and community leaders warned hospital officials Thursday night that the move would jeopardize care in one of Los Angeles County's most densely populated areas. They called on the operators of Memorial hospital, formerly known as Daniel Freeman Memorial, to reconsider plans announced this week to shut the healthcare facility's emergency room in November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2006 | Sam Quinones, Times Staff Writer
Centinela Freeman HealthSystem announced Tuesday that it will close the emergency room at Memorial hospital in Inglewood, a move that critics warn would further strain Los Angeles County's frail emergency care system. Beginning in November, patients would be shifted to the facility's sister campus, Centinela hospital, about 1 1/2 miles away, as part of a consolidation plan aimed at reducing costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2006 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
The top administrator at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center said Saturday that if the public hospital passes a recent make-or-break federal inspection, it will seek to regain accreditation and consider reinstituting cut services, including trauma care. "Once we achieve accreditation, we want to restore as many services as possible," said Antionette Smith Epps, who has been the hospital's chief executive since October.
HEALTH
August 7, 2006 | From Times wire reports
About two-thirds of cardiac-arrest patients taken to hospitals by emergency medical technicians die anyway, and probably most could be declared dead at the scene, researchers said.
HEALTH
June 19, 2006 | From Times wire reports
Heart attack victims who were resuscitated by manual chest compressions fared better than those revived with a mechanical chest compression device, a study said Tuesday. Although between 28% and 30% of heart attack victims suffering cardiac arrest survived for at least four hours whether their hearts were restarted mechanically or manually, longer term survival rates and brain functioning were higher among those revived manually, the study found.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2006 | From Reuters
U.S. emergency rooms are understaffed, overwhelmed and unable to cope with a crisis, whether a pandemic, attack or natural disaster, according to reports released Wednesday. Americans rely heavily on emergency departments and emergency medical services to save their lives when sudden illness or disaster strikes, yet these services are not properly funded and often do not live up to expectations, the reports from the independent Institute of Medicine found.
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