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HEALTH
June 16, 2008 | Marc Siegel, Special to The Times
"Grey's Anatomy" "Freedom" episode ABC, May 22 (two-hour season finale) The premise: Andrew Langston, 19, is hanging out with friends at a construction site. Trying to impress his friend Lola with his daring, he lies in wet cement. As it begins to dry into concrete, he is trapped. By the time he can be transported to Seattle Grace Hospital, almost four hours have passed.
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SCIENCE
July 24, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Want to keep your family safe? Then raise your kids in the city.  It may sound counterintuitive, but researchers found people living in densely populated urban areas in the United States are 20% less likely to die from a serious injury than people who live in rural parts of the country. So much for fresh air and open spaces. "The findings definitely surprised me," said lead researcher Sage Myers, who teaches at the University of Pennsylvania and practices emergency room medicine at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
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SCIENCE
July 24, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Want to keep your family safe? Then raise your kids in the city.  It may sound counterintuitive, but researchers found people living in densely populated urban areas in the United States are 20% less likely to die from a serious injury than people who live in rural parts of the country. So much for fresh air and open spaces. "The findings definitely surprised me," said lead researcher Sage Myers, who teaches at the University of Pennsylvania and practices emergency room medicine at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
Sara Broncho-Morning has never been to Brimfield, a town of about 10,300 in northeast Ohio.  But the Redlands resident -- and tens of thousands of others around the country and the world -- regularly reads the Facebook page for the town's police department . It's where she finds observations like this: "Attention Residents....This is an APB. We repeat...an APB. It's an All Pig Bulletin. If you have a black pot-belly pig...make sure you still have it. Some nice residents recovered one at Old Forge and Congress Lake last night.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The patient was drunk and he wanted sleeping pills, but the doctor refused him a prescription. So he returned to the small emergency room in rural North Carolina late one night with a revolver tucked into his belt. He was stalking Dr. Perry McLimore, aiming for revenge. Out of the corner of his eye, the doctor spotted the man and his gun. He ducked, grabbing a flimsy curtain for cover, but the bullet grazed his left shoulder.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2001 | Reuters
President Bush will nominate Jeffrey Runge, a North Carolina doctor trained in emergency medicine, as administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the White House said. Runge, if confirmed by the Senate, would be the fourth physician to serve as the nation's top auto-safety regulator. Runge is assistant chairman of emergency medicine at the Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte and is an expert in motor vehicle injury care and prevention.
NEWS
September 8, 1994 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Many emergency rooms are staffed by doctors who have never received special training in the basics of trauma care--how to treat a heart attack or handle a head injury, for instance--and the result is hit-or-miss treatment for patients, according to a national report to be released Monday.
NEWS
May 29, 1996
Forget that lovely thought about doctors and dentists all hanging together as kindred healers singing "Kumbaya." Ask a doctor or a dentist for the best joke they can remember, and chances are their favorite will insult a colleague, with orthopods taking the biggest hit. * How many psychiatrists does it take to change a lightbulb? Just one, but it requires many visits. And the lightbulb really has to want to change. * What are the three longest years of an orthopedic surgeon's training?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1990
Apart from containing several errors, the report ignores some important facts. Firstly, the Department of Emergency Medicine provides attending staff coverage 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The attending emergency physician is board certified with up to 15 years experience in resuscitation. Since this physician is ultimately responsible for all medical care delivered in the Emergency Department and is the most experienced physician on scene, he has to have the authority to determine the initial treatment of emergency cases.
NEWS
May 3, 1985
CARES, the Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center Auxiliary for Recruitment, Education and Service, honored four women at its annual meeting and awards luncheon Thursday. Kathryn Rubio, a nurse in the department of Emergency Medicine, was honored as nurse of the year. Dr. Mildred Milgrom, chief physician for the Outpatient Department, was named outstanding woman in medicine.
HEALTH
June 8, 2013 | By Mikaela Conley
Jerry Huang left his wheelchair at the side of the pool before gliding through more than 400 meters of water at this year's Coast 2 Coast Swim Challenge. From beginners to experts, people of all abilities swam laps to raise money for free swimming lessons for children and for people with disabilities. Huang, 15, is among those who took swimming lessons with a C2C grant. He took part in the third C2C challenge, held Sunday in Culver City, to "swim it forward. " "I've been swimming for three or four years, but last year my mom found a swim program that was specialized for people who are in my situation, people who have muscular dystrophy and other muscle disorders," said Huang, who lives in Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
America's future doctors are increasingly interested in become primary-care physicians -- good news for America's future patients. Friday was “Match Day,” the day when fourth-year medical students find out where they'll be doing their internships and residencies. The process resembles sorority rush week: Students and teaching hospitals first try to impress each other, then they rank each other in order of preference. A computer sorts through all those preferences and spits out the matches, which were made public at 1 p.m. Eastern time.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Nearly 20% of patients who are discharged from hospitals return for acute care within 30 days, researchers reported Tuesday. The team, led by Yale emergency medicine researcher Dr. Anita A. Vashi, scoured records collected between July 2008 and September 2009 that reported on 4,028,555 patients in California, Florida and Nebraska. They found that 17.9% of hospitalizations resulted in at least one hospital-based “acute care encounter” within 30 days, including readmissions for inpatient care and emergency department visits.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2012 | By Ashley Powers and Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
AURORA, Colo. - Dr. Tien Vu was fixing up a child's cut when the first victim was rolled into the emergency room. He was slumped in his wheelchair, his face gnarled in pain, his leg bloodied. A bullet had ripped into his thigh. Something's off, Vu recalled thinking. The emergency room at Children's Hospital Colorado, where Vu has worked for nearly a decade, mostly tends to kids' broken bones and stubborn fevers, though the staff has handled its share of ailing adults too. But a gunshot wound was unusual.
HEALTH
April 11, 2011 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
The premise Nurse Jackie Peyton (Edie Falco) is having trouble managing her growing addiction to painkillers. Nevertheless, she continues to snort an opiate in the supply room and pop pills in the bathroom during shifts at the hospital. Jackie works in the busy emergency room, where she helps take care of a boy who wedged a dental mirror up his nose because he was trying to see his brain. Later, another young man is brought in after being found crushed under 2 tons of books (he and his father were part of a moving team that were clearing a library that was closing)
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
"Match Day" is a sort of March Madness for med students. It's the time of year when seniors in medical schools throughout the country are matched with residency programs. Though the fine points of the process likely only matter to those craving a spot, the residency offerings do offer a glimpse of our future specialists, if not our general practitioners. The not-for-profit National Resident Matching Program on Thursday placed more than 16,000 U.S. medical students in a record 26,000 residency programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1995 | GERALD P. WHELAN, Dr. Gerald P. Whelan is an associate professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at USC School of Medicine and associate director of the Department of Emergency Medicine at L.A. County/USC Medical Center. He is also secretary-treasurer of the American Board of Emergency Medicine. and
Emergency medicine has caught the interest of the viewing public. Witness the high ratings of NBC's "ER," which soundly trounced CBS' medical offering, "Chicago Hope." It is not surprising, then, that CBS would send its biggest gun, Dan Rather, to try to strike a blow against the apparent NBC domination of this hot topic and the prime Thursday 10 p.m. time slot. Unfortunately, Dan and the "48 Hours" troupe were ill-prepared and there were casualties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992
I was very disturbed to read the article "Nutrition Program Drops 3,000 Needy Orange County Children" (Dec. 27). As an emergency medicine physician in a very busy department, I am aware of what kind of hardships this type of budget cut will inflict upon the neediest of families. This is a very severe flu season and many families are scraping by to make ends meet during the recession. Children are the hardest hit by seasonal illnesses. The Women, Infants and Children Program cutbacks are especially disappointing and potentially disastrous because malnourished children become sicker and die faster.
HEALTH
December 13, 2010 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
"Law & Order: Special Victims Unit" 9 p.m. Dec. 1, NBC Episode: "Rescue" The Premise: Twenty-six-year-old Caitlin Lemarck throws a party at which she is attacked, and her head is smashed against a mirror. She has a seizure and is taken to the hospital, where she goes into cardiac arrest. The emergency room doctors aren't able to resuscitate her, and she dies of bleeding into her brain (a subdural hematoma). Upon examining Lemarck's body, Dr. Melinda Warner ( Tamara Tunie)
NEWS
July 22, 2010 | Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Apparently, suspicion of wanna-be doctors is higher than we thought. Last week, Booster Shots reported on a study that examined the degree to which candidates for ophthalmology residency programs fudged their resumes by exaggerating – or outright inventing – their role in medical research projects. It turned out that for one program in Little Rock, the rate of such “misrepresentations” (to put it generously) was 8.1%. Similar studies examining the truthfulness of applicants to residency programs in fields including radiation oncology, orthopedics, emergency medicine, pediatrics, radiology, psychiatry and neurology found misrepresentation rates ranging from 1.8% all the way up to 100%.
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