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Emergency Preparedness

NATIONAL
February 17, 2010 | By Bob Drogin
The crisis began when college basketball fans downloaded a free March Madness application to their smart phones. The app hid spyware that stole passwords, intercepted e-mails and created havoc. Soon 60 million cellphones were dead. The Internet crashed, finance and commerce collapsed, and most of the nation's electric grid went dark. White House aides discussed putting the Army in American cities. That, spiced up with bombs and hurricanes, formed the doomsday scenario when 10 former White House advisors and other top officials joined forces Tuesday in a rare public cyber war game designed to highlight the potential vulnerability of the nation's digital infrastructure to crippling attack.
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NEWS
October 22, 1992 | Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen
These are some key recommendations issued Wednesday by the special panel charged with investigating police and city response to the riots: PREVENTION Adopt a proactive problem-solving model of policing in partnership with the community and affected city agencies. Reduce the number of officers assigned to special units and staff positions, and redeploy officers to patrol assignments. Make field command experience a primary criterion for advancement through the ranks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2005 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
In the old days they would stay and fight. Crusty, independent-minded inhabitants of Topanga Canyon filled barrels with water and laid out garden hoses when brush fires swept toward their scattered mountain cottages and creek-side counterculture enclaves. As recently as five years ago, canyon leaders mass-mailed a safety brochure to residents suggesting that the able-bodied not flee but remain home and be ready to snuff out embers once the fire front passed. But the old-timers are fading away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1996 | BILL BILLITER
Plans for a neighborhood group to be called Cypress A.W.A.R.E.--Available, Willing, Able and Responsive to Emergencies--have won City Council endorsement, and organizers say they hope to launch the project during the summer. "The program is intended to integrate Neighborhood Watch [and] emergency preparedness, and to develop community resources as a viable and vibrant, community-based policing effort," said Police Chief Daryl Wicker, who explained the program to the council this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1990
The city will sign agreements with four engineering firms whose inspectors will determine whether local bridges, freeways and railroad lines are safe after an earthquake. A staff report to the council cited the Oct. 17 earthquake in San Francisco as one of the reasons Santa Ana needs to have a plan to respond to disasters that could cripple some of the city's transportation routes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1999
More than 140 government agencies and vendors will provide information this weekend about emergency responses in case of a disaster. The city of Los Angeles will sponsor the eighth annual Emergency Preparedness Fair, which is scheduled to begin today at Griffith Park's L.A. Zoo parking lot, said Linda Aparicio, spokeswoman for the City Emergency Organization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1993 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city is "on the cutting edge" of disaster preparedness, according to a commendation Santa Clarita received for a program that teaches residents how to be self-sufficient for up to three days after a major disaster. The Emergency Preparedness Commission for Los Angeles County and its cities recognized Santa Clarita this month for using volunteers and private companies to offer the disaster training at no cost to the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2006 | Cynthia H. Cho, Times Staff Writer
The Riverside County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to buy half a million dollars' worth of the antiviral drug Tamiflu to distribute to county rescue workers in the event of a human outbreak of bird flu, joining Los Angeles and a handful of other California counties stockpiling the drug. "I think it's encouraging that some of the counties are stepping up. To me, it's an investment in emergency preparedness," said Dr.
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