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NEWS
March 17, 1990
Melvyn Helstien, 70, emeritus professor of theater at UCLA and a puppeteer whose research involved the leather puppets of South Asia, where he traveled to collect artifacts and other historical information. He was an internationally recognized expert in his field and served as head of the U.S. branch of the Union Internationale de la Marrionette. Over the years he taught theater, children's theater and stage direction while also producing puppet shows both on and off the UCLA campus.
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BUSINESS
May 10, 2013 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
Chicago entrepreneurs Jason Lucash and Mike Szymczak managed to launch a line of audio products during the recession. Their folding cardboard speakers made Time magazine's 2009 list of best inventions. National television exposure on the "Today" show and "Shark Tank" soon followed. Then they did something really surprising. They moved to California. The knock on the Golden State is that costs are too high, regulations too plentiful and the attitude toward business is generally unfriendly.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1989
Charles M. Stewart, 83, emeritus professor at the USC School of Medicine and chairman of that school's urology department until his retirement in 1971. Dr. Stewart, who had been living in Carmel for the last 12 years, studied medicine at the University of Iowa and took his internship at St. Vincent's Hospital in Los Angeles and served his residency at the old Los Angeles County General Hospital. He served with (Gen. Frank D.) Merrill's "Marauders" during World War II and upon his discharge founded the Society of Pediatric Urology in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2011
ROBERT C. PIERPOINT CBS News correspondent covered six presidents Robert C. Pierpoint, 86, a CBS News correspondent who covered six presidents, the Korean War, the Kennedy assassination and the Iranian hostage crisis in a career that spanned more than four decades, died Saturday of complications from surgery at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, his family said. The Santa Barbara resident had broken his hip Oct. 12. After making his name covering the Korean War — a role he reprised when he provided his radio voice for the widely watched final episode of "MASH" in 1983 — Pierpoint became a White House correspondent during the Eisenhower administration, a position he would hold through the Carter administration.
NEWS
March 19, 1994
Herbert Busemann, 88, emeritus professor of mathematics at USC honored by the Soviet Union and many others for his solutions to geometric problems. In 1985, Busemann received the Lobachevsky Prize for his innovative book, "The Geometry of Geodesics," published in 1955. He was the first American honored with the Soviet prize, named for the Russian geometrician and awarded every four years.
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joseph D. Carrabino, emeritus professor of management in the UCLA Graduate School of Management, has been elected president of the state Board of Education. Carrabino has been a member of the board, which sets state policy for kindergarten through 12th grade, since 1986. Marion McDowell, a deputy superintendent in the Sequoia Union High School District, was elected board vice president. Two new members--Gertie B. Thomas of Albany and Kathryn M.
OPINION
May 20, 2003
"Two's Company, Three's a Graduation at Cal State University" (May 18), on the three graduates of CSU Channel Islands, stated that "Cal State officials say they had to look back to the mid-1800s ... to find an undergraduate class nearly as small." In looking back so far they overlooked the four students in the first graduating class of Cal State Dominguez Hills in 1969. Gene Kalland Emeritus Professor Cal State Dominguez Hills
TRAVEL
February 19, 1995
The Atlantic and Indian oceans do not meet at Cape Town, South Africa, as stated by Christopher Reynolds, repeating a common error ("South Africa Calmly Awaits Acceptance by U.S. Travelers," Jan. 29). Instead, they meet about 120 miles southeast of the Cape of Good Hope at Cape Agulhas, the southernmost point of Africa and hence of the Old World landmass. In contrast to the spectacular False Cape and Cape of Good Hope (when not fogbound as usual), Cape Agulhas is rather flat, with many rocks extending far south into the ocean, or oceans.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2013 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
Chicago entrepreneurs Jason Lucash and Mike Szymczak managed to launch a line of audio products during the recession. Their folding cardboard speakers made Time magazine's 2009 list of best inventions. National television exposure on the "Today" show and "Shark Tank" soon followed. Then they did something really surprising. They moved to California. The knock on the Golden State is that costs are too high, regulations too plentiful and the attitude toward business is generally unfriendly.
OPINION
April 26, 2003
Re "A Faculty for Misstatement," Commentary, April 22: So that's where some lawyers learn their specious syllogistic reasoning. The august UCLA law professors Kenneth Klee, Daniel Lowenstein and Grant Nelson, believing the liberation of Iraq to be "just and necessary," conclude that the invasion of Iraq, which presumably resulted in the liberation of Iraq, was also, therefore, "just and necessary." Moreover, they engage in a bit of hyperbole in their claim of having been "mugged" because their endorsement of the war was not reflected in the statement approved by the majority of UCLA academic senate members who voted.
OPINION
June 27, 2010 | Arthur Rivin
I am a retired physician and an emeritus professor of medicine. I also have Alzheimer's disease. Before my diagnosis, I was certainly familiar with the disease, having seen patients with Alzheimer's over the years in my internal medicine practice. But I was slow to suspect my own affliction. Now that I've been diagnosed, I can trace my problems back some 10 years, to when I was 76. I had been chairing a monthly program in medical ethics, and I knew most of the speakers and found it easy and enjoyable to introduce them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2006 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
In the perennial battle over how the West's vast acreage of federal forests should be managed, science is a favorite weapon. And on the pro-logging side no academic has been as visible as Thomas M. Bonnicksen, particularly in California. The Texas A&M emeritus professor of forest science has testified before Congress 13 times, written numerous op-ed pieces and been widely quoted in Western newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times.
SCIENCE
October 7, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
A UC Irvine researcher and two Israeli scientists Wednesday were awarded the 2004 Nobel Prize in chemistry for their discovery of the cellular system that, like a miniature Mafia don, gives the "kiss of death" to proteins marked for destruction.
OPINION
May 20, 2003
"Two's Company, Three's a Graduation at Cal State University" (May 18), on the three graduates of CSU Channel Islands, stated that "Cal State officials say they had to look back to the mid-1800s ... to find an undergraduate class nearly as small." In looking back so far they overlooked the four students in the first graduating class of Cal State Dominguez Hills in 1969. Gene Kalland Emeritus Professor Cal State Dominguez Hills
OPINION
April 26, 2003
Re "A Faculty for Misstatement," Commentary, April 22: So that's where some lawyers learn their specious syllogistic reasoning. The august UCLA law professors Kenneth Klee, Daniel Lowenstein and Grant Nelson, believing the liberation of Iraq to be "just and necessary," conclude that the invasion of Iraq, which presumably resulted in the liberation of Iraq, was also, therefore, "just and necessary." Moreover, they engage in a bit of hyperbole in their claim of having been "mugged" because their endorsement of the war was not reflected in the statement approved by the majority of UCLA academic senate members who voted.
TRAVEL
February 19, 1995
The Atlantic and Indian oceans do not meet at Cape Town, South Africa, as stated by Christopher Reynolds, repeating a common error ("South Africa Calmly Awaits Acceptance by U.S. Travelers," Jan. 29). Instead, they meet about 120 miles southeast of the Cape of Good Hope at Cape Agulhas, the southernmost point of Africa and hence of the Old World landmass. In contrast to the spectacular False Cape and Cape of Good Hope (when not fogbound as usual), Cape Agulhas is rather flat, with many rocks extending far south into the ocean, or oceans.
NEWS
September 28, 1986 | DAVE LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
There is a Russian proverb to the effect that you learn as long as you live. Daniel Rosenthal, an emeritus professor of engineering at UCLA, prefers to put that in reverse: "You live as long as you learn." At 86, with more mental and physical enthusiasm than many half his age, Rosenthal still teaches a weekly class, this one a free course for older people titled "Your Brain: Use It or Lose It."
NATIONAL
November 17, 2008 | Nicholas Riccardi, Riccardi is a Times staff writer.
In June, leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints made a fateful decision. They called on California Mormons to donate their time and money to the campaign for Proposition 8, which would overturn a state Supreme Court ruling that permitted gay marriage. That push helped the initiative win narrow passage on election day. And it has made the Mormon Church, which for years has striven to be seen as part of the American mainstream, a political target.
NEWS
March 19, 1994
Herbert Busemann, 88, emeritus professor of mathematics at USC honored by the Soviet Union and many others for his solutions to geometric problems. In 1985, Busemann received the Lobachevsky Prize for his innovative book, "The Geometry of Geodesics," published in 1955. He was the first American honored with the Soviet prize, named for the Russian geometrician and awarded every four years.
NEWS
March 17, 1990
Melvyn Helstien, 70, emeritus professor of theater at UCLA and a puppeteer whose research involved the leather puppets of South Asia, where he traveled to collect artifacts and other historical information. He was an internationally recognized expert in his field and served as head of the U.S. branch of the Union Internationale de la Marrionette. Over the years he taught theater, children's theater and stage direction while also producing puppet shows both on and off the UCLA campus.
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