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Emerson Fittipaldi

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April 13, 1989 | Jim Murray
Every time you see Emerson Fittipaldi in a garage in Gasoline Alley or on a pit wall in Kokomo or Sheboygan, you want to ask him, "What's the matter--butler got the day off?" Or, "Get lost on your way to the palace at Monaco, did you?" You wonder what a nice sporty-car guy like him is doing in a place like this--the cockpit of one of those brutish, hair-on-the-chest Indy cars. I mean, there isn't a monocle in sight. If anybody is called "Count," he's a band leader, and a "Duke" is a ballplayer, not a peer.
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SPORTS
May 23, 2002 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Brazilian invasion of the Indianapolis 500--four of the first five starters in Sunday's race are from the South American country--actually started in 1984, when Emerson Fittipaldi showed up in a shocking-pink car, wearing a purple uniform. Fittipaldi's two earlier Formula One championships had made for a cult following of young go-kart drivers in his home country. Over a span of 20 years, Fittipaldi, Nelson Piquet and Ayrton Senna brought eight F1 titles home to Brazil.
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SPORTS
August 2, 1996 | From Reuters
Veteran race car driver Emerson Fittipaldi figures the fiery crash that gave him a broken neck might have been a sign, and he's thinking about heeding it. Fittipaldi, a two-time Indianapolis 500 and two-time Formula One champion, walked from Miami's Jackson Memorial Hospital on Thursday, wearing a neck brace, smiling and telling reporters that the Marlboro 500 on Sunday at Michigan International Speedway might have been his last race.
SPORTS
September 9, 1997 | From Associated Press
Racing champion Emerson Fittipaldi fractured his lower back when the small plane he was piloting from his family citrus farm plunged 300 feet into a swamp. The 50-year-old racer, one of Brazil's most revered athletes and a two-time Indianapolis 500 winner, was in stable condition but may need surgery. His 6-year-old son, Luca, the only other person on the plane, received minor scratches. The ultralight plane crashed Sunday in Araraquara, a citrus-growing region 220 miles northwest of Sao Paulo.
SPORTS
February 24, 1985 | Associated Press
Emerson Fittipaldi, a two-time Formula One champion from Brazil, was retired from professional racing and staying in shape only by doing a little go-kart racing for fun in the winter of 1983-84. But, at 37 years old, he still felt he had some things to prove--at least to himself. Ralph Sanchez, a Miami businessman who started what has become the Lowenbrau Grand Prix of Miami, invited Fittipaldi, a friend, to drive in his race in a car entered as the Spirit of Miami.
SPORTS
May 27, 1990 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Emerson Fittipaldi rolls off the starting line today in defense of the title he won so dramatically in last year's Indianapolis 500, history will be against him. No driver has repeated at Indy in almost 20 years, and only four have successfully defended their championship in 73 years. The last one, Al Unser, who won in 1970 and '71, is in today's race in an Alfa-Romeo.
FOOD
April 19, 1990 | JOAN DRAKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So you think that being a successful race car driver is just a matter of climbing into the right machine, driving fast and not having to worry about speeding tickets, right? What could be easier? Some sports fans, in fact, share this attitude. To them, race car drivers don't quite qualify as true athletes. But maneuvering a 720-horsepower Indy car for two to three hours at speeds that can exceed 200 miles per hour is a physical ordeal that would test the stamina of most long distance runners.
SPORTS
January 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
Roger Penske made it official that his team's drivers will be former IndyCar and Formula One champion Emerson Fittipaldi and Canadian Paul Tracy.
SPORTS
July 22, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Michael Andretti averaged a record-setting 99.143 m.p.h. to win the Molson-Indy race at Toronto. Andretti broke the mark of 95.991 set by Emerson Fittipaldi in 1987.
SPORTS
August 8, 1997
1. Emerson Fittipaldi raced before he had a driver's license. 2. Wilt Chamberlain speaks five languages. 3. A.J. Foyt was declared "dead" after a race accident. 4. Bill Russell did not attend his Basketball Hall of Fame induction. 5. Lefty Grove used a rubber stamp for his autograph. 6. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was first recruited in the ninth grade. Source: World Features Syndicate
SPORTS
February 1, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Race driver Emerson Fittipaldi, denying speculation that he was retiring, said he hopes to race again after recuperating from a broken vertebra in his neck. "I want to keep the doors open," the 50-year-old Indy car driver said during a news conference at which he had been expected to announce his retirement. "It's not the time to make a decision. I'd like to continue with competition."
SPORTS
February 1, 1997 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Race driver Emerson Fittipaldi, denying speculation that he was retiring, said he hopes to race again after recuperating from a broken vertebra in his neck. "I want to keep the doors open," the 50-year-old Indy car driver said during a news conference at which he had been expected to announce his retirement. "It's not the time to make a decision. I'd like to continue with competition."
SPORTS
August 2, 1996 | From Reuters
Veteran race car driver Emerson Fittipaldi figures the fiery crash that gave him a broken neck might have been a sign, and he's thinking about heeding it. Fittipaldi, a two-time Indianapolis 500 and two-time Formula One champion, walked from Miami's Jackson Memorial Hospital on Thursday, wearing a neck brace, smiling and telling reporters that the Marlboro 500 on Sunday at Michigan International Speedway might have been his last race.
SPORTS
July 29, 1996 | From Associated Press
A fiery crash on the second lap of the Marlboro 500 at Brooklyn, Mich., Sunday left driver Emerson Fittipaldi with a fractured vertebra and a partially collapsed left lung. Fittipaldi, 49, was examined at the medical facility on the infield of Michigan International Speedway before being taken to the hospital. None of his injuries were considered life-threatening. Fellow Brazilian Andre Ribeiro, driving a Lola-Honda, pulled away from Bryan Herta in the final seven laps to win the race by 1.
SPORTS
May 28, 1995 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The absence of defending champion Al Unser Jr. and Emerson Fittipaldi makes today's 79th Indianapolis 500 one of the most unusual in history. The Penske pair, winners of the last three 500s and the last two Indy car races this season, failed to qualify. It is the first time since 1962 that an Unser has not been on the starting grid, the first time since 1969 that Penske has not had a favorite in the field.
SPORTS
May 23, 1995 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The arrogance bred by success might have done in the proud Penske team, champions of Indy car racing until last Sunday at 6 p.m. That was when failure became a reality. Defending champion Al Unser Jr. couldn't find enough speed to make the 33-car starting grid, and his teammate, two-time winner Emerson Fittipaldi was bumped from the field. And then Roger Penske and his team showed more speed getting out of Indianapolis Motor Speedway than they had all month on the track.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Al Unser Jr. said it all without speaking: The defending Indianapolis 500 winner, after failing to qualify for this year's race, walked from his car looking stunned and holding his head with his right hand. His corporate sponsors probably had the same reaction.
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