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Emigration Mexico

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NEWS
August 3, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victor Lopez worked hard for the good life he built in Santa Ana during the past four years--a family, a well-paying job, a mortgage, a car. But it all came crashing down last February when, returning from his mother's funeral in Mexico, he was caught trying to cross the border with a counterfeit passport. Ensnared in a crackdown on illegal immigration, Lopez spent two weeks in an INS holding facility and was deported with a stern warning: Try it again and you'll do time in prison.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2006 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Babies and toddlers of California farmworkers exposed to the insecticide DDT have neurological effects that are severe enough in some cases to slow their mental and physical development, according to research by UC Berkeley scientists published today. The federally funded research involving the children of women who recently emigrated from Mexico to the Salinas Valley is the first in the United States to indicate that the pesticide harms human brain development. "This suggests that ...
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NEWS
August 4, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a haggard neighborhood of rental houses and faceless apartment buildings, of rusting shopping carts, produce trucks and litter blown against chain-link fences, the rebirth of a dying Mexican village began. Here, near 1st Street and Grand Avenue in the heart of Santa Ana, the first people from Granjenal settled 35 years ago, after two decades of following crops around the American Southwest under the U.S.-sponsored bracero program.
NEWS
September 23, 1998 | SCOTT MARTELLE and ERIKA CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Eleno Cervantes Navarrete has a job with a view, which has a lot to do with why he sticks with it. On a clear day he can see the ocean in the distance. On hazy days, the view shrinks back to the hilltops of northern San Diego County. The land isn't his. Neither are the flowers that cover it. But the job as a farm worker is, and he finds it satisfying.
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To remind himself that he is not forgotten, parish priest Javier Castro keeps a 3-foot-tall trophy from the Orange County Soccer League at the foot of his desk. His boys won the championship in 1992. They carried their prize 1,500 miles back to this picturesque farming town in northern Michoacan state, handed it to Castro and celebrated for a week. Then they went home to Santa Ana, where so many of Granjenal's people have gone.
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To remind himself that he is not forgotten, parish priest Javier Castro keeps a 3-foot-tall trophy from the Orange County Soccer League at the foot of his desk. His boys won the championship in 1992. They carried their prize 1,500 miles back to this picturesque farming town in northern Michoacan state, handed it to Castro and celebrated for a week. Then they returned to Santa Ana, where so many of Granjenal's people have gone. The priest pats his memento and sighs.
NEWS
August 4, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a haggard Orange County neighborhood of rental houses and faceless apartment buildings, of litter and rusting shopping carts, the rebirth of a dying Mexican village began. Here, near 1st Street and Grand Avenue in the heart of Santa Ana, the first people from Granjenal settled 35 years ago, after two decades of following crops around the American Southwest under the U.S.-sponsored bracero program.
NEWS
August 4, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every Saturday morning, Ramon Guillen, who left Granjenal 11 years ago at the age of 12, weeds, waters and cleans the graves of two younger brothers at Holy Sepulcher Cemetery. His brothers, Rolando and Leonardo, were gunned down on Santa Ana streets in 1994 and 1995, during the height of gang violence in the city. A cousin, also killed by gang members, is buried nearby. "I tried to talk to them," he said of his brothers, "but it's impossible to change someone if they don't want to listen.
NEWS
September 23, 1998 | SCOTT MARTELLE and ERIKA CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Eleno Cervantes Navarrete has a job with a view, which has a lot to do with why he sticks with it. On a clear day he can see the ocean in the distance. On hazy days, the view shrinks back to the hilltops of northern San Diego County. The land isn't his. Neither are the flowers that cover it. But the job as a farm worker is, and he finds it satisfying.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2006 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Babies and toddlers of California farmworkers exposed to the insecticide DDT have neurological effects that are severe enough in some cases to slow their mental and physical development, according to research by UC Berkeley scientists published today. The federally funded research involving the children of women who recently emigrated from Mexico to the Salinas Valley is the first in the United States to indicate that the pesticide harms human brain development. "This suggests that ...
NEWS
August 4, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a haggard neighborhood of rental houses and faceless apartment buildings, of rusting shopping carts, produce trucks and litter blown against chain-link fences, the rebirth of a dying Mexican village began. Here, near 1st Street and Grand Avenue in the heart of Santa Ana, the first people from Granjenal settled 35 years ago, after two decades of following crops around the American Southwest under the U.S.-sponsored bracero program.
NEWS
August 4, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a haggard Orange County neighborhood of rental houses and faceless apartment buildings, of litter and rusting shopping carts, the rebirth of a dying Mexican village began. Here, near 1st Street and Grand Avenue in the heart of Santa Ana, the first people from Granjenal settled 35 years ago, after two decades of following crops around the American Southwest under the U.S.-sponsored bracero program.
NEWS
August 4, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every Saturday morning, Ramon Guillen, who left Granjenal 11 years ago at the age of 12, weeds, waters and cleans the graves of two younger brothers at Holy Sepulcher Cemetery. His brothers, Rolando and Leonardo, were gunned down on Santa Ana streets in 1994 and 1995, during the height of gang violence in the city. A cousin, also killed by gang members, is buried nearby. "I tried to talk to them," he said of his brothers, "but it's impossible to change someone if they don't want to listen.
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victor Lopez worked hard for the good life he built in Santa Ana during the past four years--a family, a well-paying job, a mortgage, a car. But it all came crashing down last February when, returning from his mother's funeral in Mexico, he was caught trying to cross the border with a counterfeit passport. Ensnared in a crackdown on illegal immigration, Lopez spent two weeks in an INS holding facility and was deported with a stern warning: Try it again and you'll do time in prison.
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To remind himself that he is not forgotten, parish priest Javier Castro keeps a 3-foot-tall trophy from the Orange County Soccer League at the foot of his desk. His boys won the championship in 1992. They carried their prize 1,500 miles back to this picturesque farming town in northern Michoacan state, handed it to Castro and celebrated for a week. Then they went home to Santa Ana, where so many of Granjenal's people have gone.
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To remind himself that he is not forgotten, parish priest Javier Castro keeps a 3-foot-tall trophy from the Orange County Soccer League at the foot of his desk. His boys won the championship in 1992. They carried their prize 1,500 miles back to this picturesque farming town in northern Michoacan state, handed it to Castro and celebrated for a week. Then they returned to Santa Ana, where so many of Granjenal's people have gone. The priest pats his memento and sighs.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1986 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
California's economy is expected to post healthy gains through the year 2000, growing at a faster rate than the nation as a whole, and much of that growth will be concentrated in Southern California, according to a new report by Wells Fargo Bank. By the turn of the century, the total production of goods and services in California is expected to increase to an estimated $820 billion.
NATIONAL
July 26, 2010 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Climbing temperatures are expected to raise sea levels and increase droughts, floods, heat waves and wildfires. Now, scientists are predicting another consequence of climate change: mass migration to the United States. Between 1.4 million and 6.7 million Mexicans could migrate to the U.S. by 2080 as climate change reduces crop yields and agricultural production in Mexico, according to a study published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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