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Emile Lahoud

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WORLD
November 24, 2007 | Borzou Daragahi and Raed Rafei, Special to The Times
Lebanon's shaky government veered into uncertain political terrain as midnight Friday struck and the president's term expired without the naming of a successor. Faced with a constitutional crisis, the pro-Western government and the Syrian- and Iranian-backed opposition made competing claims to power, but both sides also ruled out the possibility of violence to resolve differences in the months-long dispute.
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WORLD
November 24, 2007 | Borzou Daragahi and Raed Rafei, Special to The Times
Lebanon's shaky government veered into uncertain political terrain as midnight Friday struck and the president's term expired without the naming of a successor. Faced with a constitutional crisis, the pro-Western government and the Syrian- and Iranian-backed opposition made competing claims to power, but both sides also ruled out the possibility of violence to resolve differences in the months-long dispute.
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WORLD
February 24, 2006 | From the Chicago Tribune
U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice flew into Beirut unannounced Thursday and snubbed pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud while posing before cameras with some of his leading political opponents. Rice also made it clear that the Bush administration would not shed any tears if reinvigorated efforts by its Lebanese allies succeeded in toppling Lahoud.
WORLD
February 24, 2006 | From the Chicago Tribune
U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice flew into Beirut unannounced Thursday and snubbed pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud while posing before cameras with some of his leading political opponents. Rice also made it clear that the Bush administration would not shed any tears if reinvigorated efforts by its Lebanese allies succeeded in toppling Lahoud.
WORLD
June 21, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
He weathered demands for his resignation, shrugged off the insults and outlasted the Syrian protectors who were regarded as his sole source of clout. Through it all, Lebanon's seemingly unsinkable president, Emile Lahoud, has managed to hold on to his job. He has ridden out waves of tumult, bombings and street demonstrations. He stayed put while the political fortunes of virtually everybody in Lebanon's ruling class shifted.
WORLD
May 6, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Lebanese President Emile Lahoud issued a decree confirming that elections will start May 29, meeting international demands that they not be delayed. No change was made to controversial poll rules that the Christian opposition sees as favoring Syrian allies.
WORLD
October 2, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A Lebanese lawmaker who voted against extending President Emile Lahoud's term was wounded in an assassination attempt when a parked vehicle was blown up in Beirut. Marwan Hamadeh's driver was killed, and a bodyguard was injured. Hamadeh's political bloc withdrew him from Prime Minister Rafik Hariri's Cabinet last month to protest the term extension.
WORLD
November 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
With two weeks left before the president has to step down, Lebanon's parliament speaker postponed presidential elections for the third time to give deadlocked rival factions more time to find a compromise candidate. Parliament, dominated by anti-Syrian legislators, was to meet Monday for another attempt to choose a successor to pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud, who steps down Nov. 24.
WORLD
July 1, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Lebanese President Emile Lahoud appointed an anti-Syria prime minister to form a government free from Syrian influence. Fuad Saniora, a former finance minister, was nominated by 126 of the 128 members of parliament. Saniora was a longtime aide of Rafik Hariri, the former prime minister whose February assassination triggered a sea change in Lebanese politics that led to Syria's troop withdrawal in April after 29 years.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Syria distanced itself from a top Lebanese official's suggestion that Syrian troops might be deployed at the Israeli-Lebanese border after an Israeli withdrawal from southern Lebanon. Lebanese Defense Minister Ghazi Zaytar's remarks had alarmed Israel. However, Syrian Foreign Minister Farouk Shareh, on a visit to Beirut, made it clear that Syria did not endorse Zaytar's suggestion.
WORLD
June 21, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
He weathered demands for his resignation, shrugged off the insults and outlasted the Syrian protectors who were regarded as his sole source of clout. Through it all, Lebanon's seemingly unsinkable president, Emile Lahoud, has managed to hold on to his job. He has ridden out waves of tumult, bombings and street demonstrations. He stayed put while the political fortunes of virtually everybody in Lebanon's ruling class shifted.
WORLD
January 18, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Lebanon resumed executions after a five-year pause, putting to death three convicted killers despite objections by human rights groups and the European Union. All three were put to death at Roumieh prison in Beirut, the country's main penitentiary, after President Emile Lahoud rejected appeals for clemency. Capital punishment is common in the region, but Lebanon's former Prime Minister Salim Hoss opposed the death penalty.
WORLD
August 29, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Pro-Syrian President Emile Lahoud's bid to stay in office three more years was assured as rival Prime Minister Rafik Hariri bowed to Syrian pressure and proposed a constitutional amendment allowing the head of state to extend his term. The amendment, adopted at a Cabinet meeting, will be sent to parliament, where pro-Syrian legislators hold a large majority. Lahoud's term expires Nov. 24, and parliament was expected to meet this week to pass the amendment.
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