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Emilie Schindler

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May 6, 1996 | LEOPOLD PAGE, Leopold Page, a spokesman for the 6,000 "Schindler Jews," is a Los Angeles businessman who introduced Thomas Keneally to the Schindler story in 1980 when the author walked into his shop to buy a briefcase. Page and his wife, Ludmilla, were among those saved from Nazi concentration camps by Schindler
The recent critical comments by Emilie Schindler about her late husband are a disgrace to the memory of one of the true heroes of this century (Morning Report, Calendar, April 2). Those of us who were saved by Oskar Schindler know how closely the book "Schindler's List" by Thomas Keneally and the film by Steven Spielberg portrayed the man and the events of the Holocaust. Humanity is thankful that so much of this story could be told.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Emilie Schindler, the wife of industrialist Oskar Schindler who played an important role in his efforts to save hundreds of Jews from Nazi death camps during World War II, has died. She was 93. Schindler died Friday at a hospital in Strausberg, outside Berlin, where she had been taken July 21 for treatment of an undisclosed ailment, her biographer, Erika Rosenberg, announced in a statement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Emilie Schindler, the wife of industrialist Oskar Schindler who played an important role in his efforts to save hundreds of Jews from Nazi death camps during World War II, has died. She was 93. Schindler died Friday at a hospital in Strausberg, outside Berlin, where she had been taken July 21 for treatment of an undisclosed ailment, her biographer, Erika Rosenberg, announced in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1996 | LEOPOLD PAGE, Leopold Page, a spokesman for the 6,000 "Schindler Jews," is a Los Angeles businessman who introduced Thomas Keneally to the Schindler story in 1980 when the author walked into his shop to buy a briefcase. Page and his wife, Ludmilla, were among those saved from Nazi concentration camps by Schindler
The recent critical comments by Emilie Schindler about her late husband are a disgrace to the memory of one of the true heroes of this century (Morning Report, Calendar, April 2). Those of us who were saved by Oskar Schindler know how closely the book "Schindler's List" by Thomas Keneally and the film by Steven Spielberg portrayed the man and the events of the Holocaust. Humanity is thankful that so much of this story could be told.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1996 | ART BERMAN
Schindler's Widow Writes: Oskar Schindler may be a world hero for saving some 1,300 Jews from the Nazi Holocaust, but his widow has written a book portraying him otherwise. "Emilie Schindler--Memoirs" depicts the subject of Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning movie "Schindler's List" as a greedy man whose main interest in saving Polish Jews from Adolf Hitler's death camps was to have cheap labor to keep his china factory going and to spare Schindler himself from being sent to the war's front lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1994 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tiny white-haired woman in the navy-blue pantsuit was greeted with smiles and tears as she made her way, supported by two rabbis, toward the menorah-shaped monument at the Museum of Tolerance, where she lit a flame to remember the 6 million Jews killed during the Holocaust. "Let me touch you," said one woman as she reached out to embrace Emilie Schindler, who as the wife of Oskar Schindler helped save more than 1,100 Jews during World War II.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1993
Regarding "It's the Story of a Hero in Hell," by Thomas Keneally (Dec. 12): To read novelist Keneally's comments on Oskar Schindler's widow, Emilie, whom Oskar left behind in Argentina when he went back to Germany in 1957, brought to mind my meeting her in 1988 at a luncheon the local B'nai B'rith tendered those of us on a tour to meet our members in South America. (We have members in 54 countries, including Israel.) Argentina B'nai B'rith adopted Emilie Schindler 30 years ago when it found her destitute and alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1994 | Thomas Keneally, author of "Schindler's List," spoke Monday at Claremont McKenna College. From his address: and
On the Holocaust's Relevance "The reason (Schindler's story) appealed to a novelist was that Schindler was so paradoxical. He was a great contradictory character and novelists like paradoxes and contradictions. The scoundrel/savior, virtue emerging in unexpected areas, these are the very subjects that novelists salivate over. Oskar was a great contradictory character and he remains contradictory to this day. . . . "They say that there's a moral failure in the West now over Bosnia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
No international film festival is complete without a tempest in a teapot, and Cannes got one on Tuesday when French New Wave giant Jean-Luc Godard took some by-name shots at Steven Spielberg and American cultural hegemony in his new film and the press conference devoted to it. Godard's feature, "Eloge de l'amour," is his first in competition here in more than a decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1996 | ART BERMAN
Schindler's Widow Writes: Oskar Schindler may be a world hero for saving some 1,300 Jews from the Nazi Holocaust, but his widow has written a book portraying him otherwise. "Emilie Schindler--Memoirs" depicts the subject of Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning movie "Schindler's List" as a greedy man whose main interest in saving Polish Jews from Adolf Hitler's death camps was to have cheap labor to keep his china factory going and to spare Schindler himself from being sent to the war's front lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1994 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tiny white-haired woman in the navy-blue pantsuit was greeted with smiles and tears as she made her way, supported by two rabbis, toward the menorah-shaped monument at the Museum of Tolerance, where she lit a flame to remember the 6 million Jews killed during the Holocaust. "Let me touch you," said one woman as she reached out to embrace Emilie Schindler, who as the wife of Oskar Schindler helped save more than 1,100 Jews during World War II.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1993
Regarding "It's the Story of a Hero in Hell," by Thomas Keneally (Dec. 12): To read novelist Keneally's comments on Oskar Schindler's widow, Emilie, whom Oskar left behind in Argentina when he went back to Germany in 1957, brought to mind my meeting her in 1988 at a luncheon the local B'nai B'rith tendered those of us on a tour to meet our members in South America. (We have members in 54 countries, including Israel.) Argentina B'nai B'rith adopted Emilie Schindler 30 years ago when it found her destitute and alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1993 | THOMAS KENEALLY, Thomas Keneally is author of the 1982 book "Schindler's List," upon which Steven Spielberg's film, which opens Wednesday, is based . The Australian-born Keneally was moved during a visit to Los Angeles to write the book, which examines German businessman Oskar Schindler and the Jews he saved during World War II. Keneally, who won England's Booker Prize for "Schindler's List," is also the author of "The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith" and "To Asmara" and teaches in the graduate writing program at UC Irvine. Here, he remembers the original Schindler survivors who inspired his book:
Thirteen years ago, I was returning to Australia from a film festival in Sorrento, Italy, where Fred Schepisi's film of my novel "The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith" had been shown. In those days Australia wasn't quite the glamour destination it is now. There were only two flights a week from Los Angeles to Sydney. Between planes, my publisher got me to do some book promotion, and I found myself staying in the splendid Beverly Wilshire Hotel. Among my luggage was a briefcase with a sprung hinge, caused by packing in too much film festival bumf.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1994 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In her roles in Hollywood films, Caroline Goodall has been the wife of a guy who can't decide whether he wants to grow up ("Hook"), the wife of a womanizing Nazi war profiteer ("Schindler's List") and a lover to a psychotic ex-CIA agent who wants to kill Sylvester Stallone but settles for killing her ("Cliffhanger"). Now, Goodall finds herself wed to a Michael Douglas who can't keep his trousers zipped up in "Disclosure."
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