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April 19, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Grammy-winning Tejano singer Emilio Navaira, less than a month after being severely injured in a bus crash, is now able to stand and sit up, eat and talk with his family, his doctors said Friday. His recovery has gone so well that he could be released from the hospital in several weeks. Although Navaira has made much progress, doctors at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center in Houston said his recovery once he goes home could take months or even longer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Grammy-winning Tejano singer Emilio Navaira, less than a month after being severely injured in a bus crash, is now able to stand and sit up, eat and talk with his family, his doctors said Friday. His recovery has gone so well that he could be released from the hospital in several weeks. Although Navaira has made much progress, doctors at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center in Houston said his recovery once he goes home could take months or even longer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1995 | STEVE BENNETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The skin-tight Wranglers, cowboy boots, starched button-down, the flashy silver belt-buckle big enough to pan-fry a steak on--it's the country singer's uniform. And this particular one wears it well. But what's this? Olive skin? A rather rakish mustache? Spanish as sharp as a trilled rrrrrr ? We're definitely not in Nashville anymore. And now, Emilio Navaira--or simply Emilio, as he's being billed--has been ordained as the next crossover hope.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Even if he survives a horrific head injury suffered in a bus crash, Grammy-winning Tejano singer Emilio Navaira faces a long recovery and an uncertain future, his doctors say. Navaira, 45, known to his fans simply as Emilio, was behind the wheel of his tour bus before dawn Sunday after a weekend show when it slammed into an interchange barrier on a Houston-area freeway, propelling him through the windshield. Dr. Alex Valadka, director of neurotrauma services at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center and vice chair of neurosciences at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, on Tuesday described Navaira as stable but added, "We're still afraid something adverse could happen."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Even if he survives a horrific head injury suffered in a bus crash, Grammy-winning Tejano singer Emilio Navaira faces a long recovery and an uncertain future, his doctors say. Navaira, 45, known to his fans simply as Emilio, was behind the wheel of his tour bus before dawn Sunday after a weekend show when it slammed into an interchange barrier on a Houston-area freeway, propelling him through the windshield. Dr. Alex Valadka, director of neurotrauma services at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center and vice chair of neurosciences at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, on Tuesday described Navaira as stable but added, "We're still afraid something adverse could happen."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Tejano superstar Emilio plunged into the mainstream with a country album sung mostly in English last fall, he knew he was going to tread where only a few have gone before. "It's two separate worlds, and now I'm living in both of them," said the 33-year-old musician from his San Antonio home recently. In both worlds he is now known simply as Emilio, having dropped his last name--Navaira--when the album, "Life Is Good," was released in October.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Toxicology tests show that Grammy-winning tejano singer Emilio Navaira was intoxicated when the tour bus he was driving crashed into freeway barrels in suburban Houston in March, authorities said. Navaira, 45, was driving his tour bus March 23 when it slammed into the barrels, throwing him through the windshield. Doctors performed two brain surgeries and repaired an aneurysm on his right lung. He is recovering.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | ELENA KELLNER
Mark your calendars for Feb. 24. With more than 80 music categories covering everything from classical to rap, this year's Grammy awards ceremony, to be televised locally by KCBS, Channel 2, promises plenty of excitement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1997 | ENRIQUE LAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jose L. Hernandez, leader of the acclaimed Mariachi Sol de Mexico, may have said it a thousand times before, but when he took the stage Thursday night at a packed Galaxy Concert Theatre, he said it one more time for good measure. "Many people think that mariachis are four panzones [fat guys] in a cantina singing tired old songs," he said before launching into the group's second encore number.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Tejano superstar Emilio plunged into the mainstream with a country album sung mostly in English last fall, he knew he was going to tread where only a few have gone before. "It's two separate worlds, and now I'm living in both of them," said the 33-year-old musician from his San Antonio home recently. In both worlds he is now known simply as Emilio, having dropped his last name--Navaira--when the album, "Life Is Good," was released in October.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1995 | STEVE BENNETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The skin-tight Wranglers, cowboy boots, starched button-down, the flashy silver belt-buckle big enough to pan-fry a steak on--it's the country singer's uniform. And this particular one wears it well. But what's this? Olive skin? A rather rakish mustache? Spanish as sharp as a trilled rrrrrr ? We're definitely not in Nashville anymore. And now, Emilio Navaira--or simply Emilio, as he's being billed--has been ordained as the next crossover hope.
OPINION
January 21, 1996 | Joel Kotkin
The emerging Latino majority in Southern California, with its rich musical heritage, historical dramas and vibrant images, has been, until recently, relegated to the fringes of the entertainment world. To a large extent, this has more to do with the incestuous nature of the entertainment business than with racism.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2003
General Field Record of the Year: "Don't Know Why," Norah Jones (Jones, Arif Mardin and Jay Newland, producers; Arif Mardin and Jay Newland, engineers/mixers). Album of the Year: "Come Away With Me," Norah Jones (Jones, Arif Mardin, Jay Newland and Craig Street, producers; Husky Huskolds, Arif Mardin and Jay Newland, engineers/mixers; Ted Jensen, mastering engineer). Song of the Year: "Don't Know Why," Jesse Harris (Norah Jones, artist). Best New Artist: Norah Jones.
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